Bridge Mode Setup Guide

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@spigirl you should be fine.  Just make sure that the modem isn't parked inside the structured wiring cabinet where the telephone and ethernet cables terminate in the basement.  The modem should be parked somewhere where it has adequate ventilation.  Just to note, you can park the modem anywhere in the house where you have a cable outlet, so, it doesn't necessarily have to sit in the basement.  It all depends on the wiring in your home.  If you have structured wiring in your home you can run cable or ethernet data all over the house.  That bundle typically consists of two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable tv, one Cat-5e or possibly Cat-6 for ethernet and one Cat-3, possibly Cat-5e for telephones.  There is usually one run to every room in the home, with the termination point in the basement, in the structured wiring cabinet.  If the ethernet cables have their connectors properly installed, you should see well above 100 mb/s throughout the home.  If you find that an ethernet ports in any room won't go above 100 Mb/s for a download test, thats a sign that the connectors at either end of that run are not installed properly and as a result you are limited in data rates.  Thats a simple matter of replacing the connector(s) and ensuring that they are installed properly.  Its very easy to install a connector improperly, so that can happen.  

 

So, if you do happen to have that cable bundle installed, you could park the modem upstairs as well (connected via RG-6) and then connect directly to the router.  From there you can backfeed ethernet data down to the structured wiring cabinet, connect to a gigabit switch, and then connect all of the other room ethernet cables to that switch, providing ethernet data to all of the remaining rooms.  That works very well.  



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@Datalink Thanks for the response.

 

So, just to make sure I've got this down...I'm not as techy as most on here.

 

I can use the coaxial cable outlet in a room upstairs and connect the modem to that, and then connect the modem to the cat5 outlet in the room?  And then in the basement, do I need a switch to bring everything together and send the signals to the other cat5 outlets?

 

IF this is the case, then would I need a splitter in the room upstairs, since I'm looking to connect both the tv and the modem to the coaxial?

 

Thanks so much again.

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@spigirl can you let me know if you have just the internet modem and the cable box, or are you running Rogers Homephone as well or more than one cable box?  This will make a difference in the splitter that is installed in the basement.  



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@Datalink we have the hitron modem, and we DO have Rogers home phone as well. We also have a whole home pvr with the main box in the basement.
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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Ok, so all of those modems/pvr's are currently sitting in different rooms, correct?  From your desciption that would mean that you have a 4 port splitter installed in the basement.  You could confirm that by looking at the splitter.  It would have 1 input which is the cable inbound from the street, and 4 output ports.  The output ports should be marked -3.5, -7, -7, -7.  Those represent the signal drops at each port.  The internet cable would be located on the port marked -3.5, which is the least amount of signal drop on the splitter.  

 

The other possibility is that you have a powered amp installed.  You would see that its plugged into a power source and should be easily recognizable. 

 

If you could have a quick look and let me know what you have I'll let you know what you might be able to do.  

 

Did you want to move the modem to a room that already has a cable box installed, or will it be going to a room that has a cable port at the wall that is currently not used?  If you're connecting to an unused cable port, that makes this very simple.  



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@Datalink I'll have to check once I get home. In the basement is only the whole home pvr main unit, home phone connection, and Internet connection. I'm looking to move the modem to a room that has a TV in it already, so the wall cable connection is already take up by the STB in that room.
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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Currently I am using an older TP-Link router as a wireless access point and my Rogers Rocket modem (unsure of exact model, I can check tonight) to handle DHCP etc.  I have ordered a new TP-Link Acrcher C9 AC1900 router to finally get AC in my home and thought this might be a good chance to possible improve the network.

 

My question is, is it possible to bridge the Rogers modem but still have it function as a switch?  My home has 4 ethernet runs including one into my office on the main floor where I put the wireless modem for better coverage and so I can wire my PC and printer to the router.  Right now the cable is plugged into the modem in the basement and then connected to the 4 ethernet ports connecting the rest of the house.  Am I able to plug the ethernet connection to my office into a WAN port on the modem in basement and still have the other WAN ports on the modem get IPs from the new router if I bridge the modem?  I need the ethernet ports in the basement to work for my NAS as well at home theatre connection but thought it might be better if the TP-Link handled all the network admin.

 

Sorry if this isn't clear and I can post more details tonight if needed. 

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Unfortunately, no 😞

When in bridge mode, while each of the devices plugged into the modem itself would get internet.. they would get an external IP.  They essentially all are bridging.  All on their own separate networks.

 

I am currently running a similar setup as you.. for much the same reasons.
While i do have a higher end router.. it still only being used as an AP.
When/if i do ever have to change.. i will have to run a 2nd run back down to where the modem is, to a switch, etc there.



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Ok thanks, I do actually have two ethernet plugs on opposite sides of my office so I could run the signal back down to the panel to a switch but that's probably not really necessary.

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

 

@davej13 what you're probably going to need to do is something like this:

 

 

                                                                                               LAN ports

Modem (Bridge Mode)  --->   Cat 5e/6    --->  Router --->  Cat 5e/6 --->  gigabit switch --->  devices

                                                                         WAN           --->  Cat 5e/6 --->  device

                                                                          port            --->  Cat 5e/6 --->  device

                                                                                              --->  Cat 5e/6 --->  device

 

The router, in full router mode will handle all of the DHCP duties for the network.  The hard part is when you have the router parked in a location that is less than ideal, in terms of cable paths to the other devices.  Something to keep in mind is that the modem can be parked just about anywhere that you have an RG-6 port available at a wallplate.  That might make it easier to park the modem and router together in one location and then use the Cat 5e/6 cable to backfeed to the location where the other Cat 5e/6 cables converge.  At that convergence point, you would park an unmanaged gigabit switch and connect all of the Cat 5e/6 cables to that switch to provide internet service to all of the rooms.

 

If you have structured wiring installed you should be able to do this without difficulty.  Structured wiring is a cable bundle that is run from the structured wiring cabinet to each room, usually one run per room.  The bundle usually consists of two RG-6 cables for satellite and cable tv, one Cat 5e/6 cable for ethernet, and one Cat 3 (possibly Cat 5e) for telephone.  Typically the builder will install a telephone or RG-6 connector on the appropriate cable that is exposed on the wallplate and tuck the remaining cables in behind the wallplate for the home owner to discover and put to use.  If thats the case, then its a matter of installing the right keystones on the cables and keystone wallplate for the rooms, and installing the correct keystones at the cabinet so that the cable ends can be installed in a rack.