Bridge Mode Setup Guide

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 48

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Interesting, I'll take a look at what cables are available. How would I verify if structured cables are present?
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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

If you look behind any wallplate with a cable or telephone connector on it, you might see the rest of the bundle sitting behind the wallplate.  If you look at the structured wiring cabinet, you would probably see the other end of the cables in the cabinet bundled together, without any connectors installed.  I'm assuming that if the wire bundles were installed, the cabinet ends would be pulled into the cabinet.  If the cabinet is in the basement and that portion of the basement was't finished, you might see the cables rolled up, sitting above or behind the cabinet.  



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Posts: 8

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

I have the Hitron CGN3 , set up in bridge mode, connected in my basement.  I have a D-LINK router set up on the 2nd floor of the house.  I am trying to find a way to have all the wired traffic run through the router, as well as the wireless traffic.  

 

Right now on the D-LINK router, I can see all the devices connected via wi-fi, but I'm looking to be able to manage also wired devices through the router.  Is this possible?

 

Our house is CAT5 wired, so the router is connected to the modem via CAT5 from the 2nd floor to the basement.  There are 3 other CAT5 cables in the basement which connect to the other bedrooms, where the other devices are wired.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

 

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@spigirl, yes it's possible to do what you are asking.  There are a couple ways to do this:

 

1.  You would need dual ethernet runs to the location where the router currently sits, one run up from the basement, and one run back down to the basement where it would be connected to an unmanaged gigabit switch.  The switch would then be connected to the other ethernet cabling providing service to the rooms where those cables terminate.

 

2.  You would need structured cabling installed, one run from the basement to each room.  Structured cabling is a cable bundle consisting of two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable tv, one Cat 5e ethernet for data, and one Cat 3, possibly a Cat 5e instead for telephone service.  With that bundle in place, you could run two RG-6 cables to the same upstairs location, one for the internet modem and one for the cable tv receiver.  Using two cables allows the user to keep the splitter loss to a minimum for the internet modem.  Downstairs, where the modem is located, its most likely run off of the -3.5 db port on a splitter if you have three or more modems in the home.  That includes internet, cable tv's and Home Phone.  Instead of connecting the modem via short cable to that -3.5 dB port on the splitter, one of the structured wiring RG-6 cables would be connected to that port, and would terminate upstairs where you might possibly have an existing cable connector on a wallplate.  If so, it would be a matter of installing the necessary connector, keystone and wallplate that holds the number of keystones for the services provided at that wallplate.  The wallplates can hold multiple connectors if required.

 

So, if you had structured cabling installed, you would park the modem upstairs, connected via RG-6 cable to the downstairs splitter, and then connect the modem to the router via short Cat-6 cable.  From there, you would connect one of the routers LAN ports to the ethernet cable that runs downstairs.  Downstairs, install an unmanaged gigabit switch and connect all of the ethernet cables to that switch.  You would have internet and LAN capability to all of the connected rooms.  If you used a NAS, you would then be able to access the NAS files across the local lan which is connected via the gigabit switch.  

 

The big question is, do you have more than just Cat-5e cabling in your home.  If you take a wallplate off of the electrical box in the wall, you would be able to easily check for additional cabling, which would be the remainder of the structured cable bundle.  If so, there should be at least 4 cables in that bundle.  If you look downstairs in the structured wiring cabinet, you would also see the remaining cables from the bundles sitting in the cabinet, most likely without connectors installed.  

 

Builders typically install a single connector, it could be a telephone or cable tv connector on the appropriate cable and tuck the rest of the bundle in the electrical box, where it sits, waiting for the home owner to discover and put to use.  

 

Hope this helps. 



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Poor connection with the coda 4582 gateway and need help on how to setup a third party router.

 

so in my house there are no ethernet ports, this means that almost all connection in the house is via wifi. I am currently experiencing awful connection from the coda-4582 gateway, and am wondering how to set up a third party router (Netgear nighthawk AC1900). I obviously want to have the gateway in bridge mode, but there is no option or guide on how to do that.
so the connection goes coax cable to the modem, and then thats it, thats the internet source. How do i go about setting up this router on a MAC, and also how to setup the gateway in bridge mode. Thanks

Also, I live in St. John's NL and our internet, cable and phone service is supplied through underground cabling.

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@rforward

 

1.  Log into the modem and navigate to the BASIC .... Gateway Function tab

2.  Disable the Residential Gateway Function and Save the setting, which will initiate a reboot into Bridge mode. 

3.  While rebooting, or after the reboot into Bridge mode, connect the router to one of the modem's LAN ports.  

4.  Start the router and run a factory reset to clear out any previous settings used for the previous ISP. 

5.  Reset the router parameters as required. 

 

That should do it.  

 

Note, for the modem's wifi settings, here it what I usually recommend in case you want to give the modem's wifi another go.  Also note that Beamforming is not enabled on the modem, not sure about MU-MIMO at this time which runs a process to broadcast to 4 devices simultaneously with different spatial locations.

 

Check/set the following 2.4 Ghz wifi parameters:

 

Wireless Mode: 802.11 n
Channel Bandwidth: 20/40 Mhz, although, for test puposes you could set this to 20 Mhz. In a crowded wifi environment, I would set this for 20 Mhz.
Wireless channel: AUTO or, to an open channel if one existed, or to the channel that offers the least interference from neighboring routers and modems
WPS Enabled: OFF
Security Mode: WPA-Personal
Auth Mode: WPA2-PSK
Encrypt Mode: AES only

 

Save the setting and ensure that the Encrypt Mode stays on AES only. If it changes on its own to TKIP/AES, change it back to AES only and save the setting again. TKIP is no longer secure and is also not compatible with 802.11n resulting in a data rate cap at 54 Mb/s (802.11g rates).   

 

Check/set the following 5 Ghz wifi parameters:

 

Wireless Mode: 802.11 a/n/ac mixed
Channel Bandwidth: 80 Mhz, although, for test puposes you could set this to 40 Mhz
Wireless channel: 149 to 165
WPS Enabled: OFF
Security Mode: WPA-Personal
Auth Mode: WPA2-PSK
Encrypt Mode: AES only

 

Once again, save the setting and ensure that the Encrypt Mode stays on AES only. If it changes on its own to TKIP/AES, change it back to AES only and save the setting again.

 

Reboot the modem if you had to make any changes, ADMIN ..... DEVICE RESET .... Reboot.

 

Note that channels 149 to 165 should be used due to their higher max broadcast power of 1 watt versus the limit of the lower channels at 50 or 200 mw which is dependent on when the device was approved by Industry Canada. 

 

To log into the modem, while the modem is in Gateway mode, you can use 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.100.1.  When the modem is in Bridge mode and the router is up and running, you can only use 192.168.100.1, using either a direct connection to the modem, or thru the router with a connected pc or other device.  

 

To flip the modem back into Gateway mode, you can run a factory reset by depressing the recessed reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds and releasing it.  That will initiate a Factor Reset and reboot the modem back into Gateway mode.  In this case you will have to reset all of the parameters.  The second approach is to log into the modem using 192.168.100.1, navigate back to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION tab, and re-enable the Residential Gateway Function.  Save the setting and the modem will reboot back into Gateway mode with its previous settings intact.

 



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@Datalink

should  I not turn off the gateways router function/ 2.4 and 5ghz signal? as it could interfere with the new routers signal?

 

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

In Bridge mode the modem does not provide any services, including wifi, firewall, DHCP, etc, etc.  Every service is disabled and it becomes a modem only, albeit one that is definitely more complicated than days past due to the DOCSIS transmit and control requirements.  In Bridge mode you need to provide your own router, or you can connect directly to the modem, which I don't recommend except for very very short test periods.  I disable the wifi, more as a habit than anything else.  The modem should be fine, switching from Gateway to Bridge mode, even with various services up and running in Gateway mode. 



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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

@Datalink

Will i have to change any setting like the modems IP address after i set it not bridge mode, because I read that after the third party router is hooked up it will take the IP address of the gateway which can create problems for your network in general.

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Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

With the modem in Bridge mode, the router will probably take up the 192.168.0.1 address unless its hardcoded to something like 192.168.1.1 after its Factory Reset.  Each make of router is slightly different.  In any event, you don't have to change the router LAN IP address unless you want to.  With the ability to use 192.168.100.1 to access the modem thru the router, having the router at 192.168.0.1 isn't a problem. 

 

When you flip the modem to Gateway mode, with the router set for Auto IP Assignment, the modem will assign a different IP address to the router.  If you wanted to use the router with the modem running in Gateway mode, you should set the router to Access Point mode, either with the routers mode selection, or do it manually.  To do that manually you would disable the DHCP service and Firewall in the router and connect the modem's LAN port to one of the router LAN ports.  If you have an Access Point mode selection in the router's user interface, then the router should kill the DHCP and firewall with that selection.  The router would remain connected thru its WAN port in this case.