Bridge Mode Setup Guide

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,221

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Multiple Console Support

 

You need to widen your search sources to answer that question.  Have a look at the following page:

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/xboxone/comments/1u03ew/list_of_routers_supporting_2_xb1s_with_open_nat/

 

If that doesn't provide the answers you are looking for, try running a search for something like:

 

router with xbox Multiple Console Support

 

Here is Microsofts forum page for the various routers that are on the market. 

 

http://forums.xbox.com/xbox_forums/xbox_support/networking-hardware/02-routers/default.aspx

 

If you drill down to the manufacturer you are interested in and the model you want to know about, in the top Overview section of each model sub-page there is a listing of "how to do sections"  and down at bottom of that page is a section that indicates Multiple Console Support.  There might also be a separate top section titled Multiple Console Support.  So, you should simply have to browse through that forum to check out what the routers support, or don't support.

 

If you ran the modem in Bridge mode with a router on one port you could put one xbox on another port and it would basically be in its own DMZ with its own IP address, but it wouldn't have the protection of a router sitting ahead of it.  There should be enough info above for you to find a router that will meet your requirements.  I doubt that you will find someone on the forum like yourself to answer that question, running three xbox consoles and being able to do that through a router as you are trying to determine before buying one.

 



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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Help making a "Bridged Mode Setup Guide"

i did bridge mode for my cisco 3285 based on Rogers instruction.

the wireless doest not work anymore, however port 1,2,3,4 are all active, not just port 1 active.

do you know why?

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,982

Re: Help making a "Bridged Mode Setup Guide"

Technically in bridged mode... ALL ports are still active.

Plugging a device into each.. will actually get you an EXTERNAL IP address on each device.

 

Technially all devices will be 'on the internet'.  But they are also open then out, without firewall possibly, etc.
They would also not be able to communicate with each other, like on a local network, etc.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

I've been on an unlimited plan for a while, and purchased my own modem.  I use an apple airport extreme so I had to bridge the modem.  This was a couple of years ago, and I remember finding the process a little unpleasant.  

 

Anyways, I'd like to keep using the airport and I just picked up a rocket modem, would like to install tonight.  Can I just call tech support and have them disable the wifi stuff so I can use the aiport as the router, and be done with it? 

 

Or is there much more to it?  I see threads with people wanting to do this themselves, and it seems like there's a lot of frustration involved - which I don't really want to do through. 

 

Any advice appreciated!  Thanks!

 

p.s. my airport extreme is not the current model, but the generation prior.  Would I be better to just abandon it and use the built in wi-fi in the modem since it does AC?  I just get the sense somehow (maybe something I heard or read) that this is less secure since it can be tapped into by the mothership.  I just dont know so happy for guidance on this as well!

 

 

 

***Edited Labels***

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,221

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Tech support can bridge the modem for you.  Its really not a problem to bridge a modem, especially the CGN3 or CGN3ACR, just a matter of disabling the Residential Gateway function.  After that, the modem will reboot into Bridge mode.  To return to Gateway mode, all you have to do is depress the reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds and release.   The modem will then reboot into Gateway mode after running a factory reset.  All of the functions will be reset back to factory default values, including modem password, and network names and passphrases.

 

When you set the modem into Bridge mode, you should reboot, and possibly reset your router back to factory defaults and then reset the parameters as required.  To set Bridge mode on the CGN3, and probably the CGN3ACR, log into the modem, navigate to BASIC.....GATEWAY FUNCTION, and disable the Residential Gateway Function.  Save the settings, which should be followed by an automatic reboot into Gateway mode.

 

As for abandoning your router for the 802.11ac functionality in the modem, I would suggest trying an experiment to see if you are satisfied with the wifi performance of the modem.   If it works out, keep it running in that configuration, if not, use your own router. 

 

It is possible to run the modem in Gateway mode, use the 5 Ghz 802.11ac functionality and also run the airport extreme as well for a 2.4 Ghz network.  It would require setting an IP address in the airport extreme  and turning off the DHCP server functionality in the airport extreme.  After that, the modem then handles all of the LAN IP addresses.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Thanks a million for answering my question.  Went into the modem and changed the wireless channels to be off and disabled gateway. I think I am up and running, but my only issue now is speed. 

 

With the extreme plan I was on (not fibre) I was getting about 50mb download and 4 up.  Now I am getting 27-30 down and 10 up.  Supposed to be getting 100 down. 

 

Everything rebooted - still much slower than it should be.  I didn't really expect it to be faster than 50 down just because my extreme plan was rated for higher speed than what I was getting, so I just expected the bottlenecks that I have (older wi fi protocol is my guess) to keep the speed down at about the same level.  But this is unexpectedly worse.  😞

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,221

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Ok, here is a simple check you can do.  Look at the back of the CNG3ACR, specifically the connected port LED.  If the LED is amber, that means that the CGN3ACR interconnect rate to the airport extreme is 1 Gb/s, which will support all of rogers high speed data plans.   If the LED is green, the data rate between the two devices is capped at 100 Mb/s.  Can you let me know what colour it indicates.

 

Also, please check the model type at the back of the modem while you are there.  Is it a CGN3 or CGN3ACR - CGNM.  Silly question possibly, but I know that Rogers is short of the CGN3ACRs and as a result, customers have been receiving CGN3s.  If that is what you have, the CGN3, with the previous version firmware throttles down a 100 Mb/s connection, or connected device to 35 Mb/s max.  If this is the case right now, this will be corrected in approx three to four days when the next version firmware is uploaded.

 

The remaining question which ties in with the LED colour and modem type is what is the WAN port speed of the airport extreme.  Is it 1 Gb/s or 100 Mb/s.  I don't know the answer to that one just yet.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,982

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Then beyond that.. would be looking at your wireless setup.

Depending on the limiations of the airport extreme wireless and your devices... interfearance, etc.. which can limit the speed.

Those speed tests i am assuming were on WIRELESS and not WIRED?



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

The LED is green.  It's a CNGM modem. 

 

My speed test was wireless both before and after the change.  Before the change of modem I got faster speeds than with the new, same setup. 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,221

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Ok, that indicates that the max data rate to the airport extreme is currently 100 Mb/s.  That is either due to the airport extreme WAN port speed, or due to the connecting cable.  The CGNM will not be able to determine which of the two is the limiting device.  What model year is the airport exterme, and do you have another Cat 5e or Cat 6 ethernet cable on hand that you can swap in for a test. 

 

The only way to really determine if you are seeing the data rates that your plan calls for is to run a two step test. 

 

1.  The first thing to try, in your current configuration with the airport extreme in place is to connect a pc or laptop via ethernet to one of the LAN ports on the airport extreme.  Run a speedtest using Rogers speedcheck or the speedtest.net Toronto Telus server.  Take note of the ping time, download and upload rates. 

 

2.  The second step is to reset the CGNM back to Gateway mode by using the reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds and releasing it.  While it is rebooting, disconnect the pc or laptop from the airport extreme and connect it to one of the CGNM ports.  Can  you have a look at the connected port LED and let us know what colour it is.?  You could disconnect the airport extreme at this point or turn it off, just for test purposes.  When the pc or laptop has picked up an IP address from the CGNM, run another set of speedtests using the same servers. 

 

What you should see, on both wired tests are peak download rates above 100 Mb/s when you factor in the additional rate provided by Rogers speedboost. The upload rates should also be up just over 10 Mb/s as well. 

 

The whole purpose of doing this is to determine what the wired data rates are, through the CGNM and through the airport extreme.  If they are where they are supposed to be, in both cases, then the issue is solely between the airport extreme and the wireless devices.  If they turn out to be less than expected, that leads to the following questions:

 

1.  Is there a cable signal problem?  This can be determined by loging into the modem (at this point its using the default cusadmin / password combination), navigating to the STATUS.....DOCSIS WAN page, copying the downstream and upstream tables and pasting them into this thread.  With those tables, its possible to determine if there are any problems with the cable feed to the modem. 

2.  Is there an ethernet cable problem?  In that case, do you have a spare Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable around that you know is in good condition that can be swapped in for testing, so that you can rerun the tests.

3.  Is the end test device capable of supporting 100 Mb/s?  That sounds like a silly question but to accurately gauge the capability of the delivery system, you need a pc or laptop capable of download rates much higher than 100 Mb/s.  We have an Acer laptop that simply will not run above 200ish Mb/s, wired or wireless, so it's pretty useless when it comes to testing our 250 Mb/s connection, which provides for peak download rates as high as 340 Mb/s. 

 

When we have the wired rates nailed down, we can then look at the wireless situation, knowing that the data rates through the CGNM and / or airport extreme are where they are supposed to be.