Bridge Mode Setup Guide

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I'm a Regular
Posts: 62

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

I know I can just setup bridged mode myself. But every Rogers representative I talk to says I have to call them to do it.

 

So which one is right?

 

Thanks in advance!

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,829

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Do it yourself.  If you ever run into problems in bridge mode, do a factory reset using the reset button at the back, and, you're back in Gateway mode once again.



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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide


@GaryKing wrote:

I know I can just setup bridged mode myself. But every Rogers representative I talk to says I have to call them to do it.

 

So which one is right?

 

Thanks in advance!


Both. 🙂

 

I think that, once upon a time, some of the Rogers D3 gateways did not have a customer-accessible bridge mode setting, but it was still there and could be enabled by tech support. The CGN2, DPC3825, and CGN3 (which are the only three gateways you should be using) all have a customer-accessible bridge mode setting...

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

I'm sure most of you know that the wifi modem that rogers supplies us with has terrible wifi signal/strength.

If you're wondering what i am talking about it is at the link here:

http://www.rogers.com/web/link/modems

 

It's the second one on the list 

(Wi-Fi Modem2)

 

I heard that you can connect or "bridge" routers together for increased strength or better signal. I was wondering if anyone could explain this to me? I have another Dlink router with antenna and I was hoping for better signal upstairs in my house ( The router is located downstairs in the basement)

 

So if someone could explain to me how to bridge my routers together i'd be greatful. Thank you.

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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Not only do their customers know about the poor wifi on the Rogers gateway modems, but Rogers is well aware of it too. They even have all of the instructions available on-line for bridging their modems. Based on your link and description, you would follow the instructions for the CGN2. Hope this helps! http://www.rogers.com/web/Rogers.portal?Ntt=bridge+mode&_nfpb=true&N=&_pageLabel=support_results

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,213

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

It's not just rogers, nor could they 'fix' it.

Take a look at just about any carrier which uses gateway devices. (Bell, U.S. companies, etc)

ALL gateway devices seem to have poor range/signal on the wireless :(. Seems inherent to the device.
May work for some people with smaller houses, apartments, etc... But definitely not for all/most people 😞

The above link posted should help you in setting it.
You can also call in and have a phone rep do it for you.



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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide


@MRC390 wrote:

I'm sure most of you know that the wifi modem that rogers supplies us with has terrible wifi signal/strength.

If you're wondering what i am talking about it is at the link here:

http://www.rogers.com/web/link/modems

 

It's the second one on the list 

(Wi-Fi Modem2)

 

I heard that you can connect or "bridge" routers together for increased strength or better signal. I was wondering if anyone could explain this to me? I have another Dlink router with antenna and I was hoping for better signal upstairs in my house ( The router is located downstairs in the basement)

 

So if someone could explain to me how to bridge my routers together i'd be greatful. Thank you.


I worry that you're confusing two different things, which I will explain.

 

1) "Bridge mode" on the Rogers gateways - what that means is that instead of providing routing (NAT), wireless, DHCP and modem functionality, the Rogers gateway ONLY serves as a modem, and your own equipment handles everything else. 

 

2) Various methods of adding another wireless access point in your house to improve your wireless signal strength in another part of the house. (Most consumer routers can be turned into access points either by using a dedicated access point mode, like in Asus' AsusWRT software, or by not plugging anything into the WAN port, assigning the LAN side an IP on the same subnet as the rest of the network and turning off DHCP)

 

 

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I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 359

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

The other issue is that the natural spot for a cable modem is in your basement where all of your home's wiring is terminated, especially if you have ethernet cabling in your house.  This is probably the WORST place in your house to have a Wifi Access Point (WAP).  I deal with this by bridging my gateway AND I have several WAPs around my house that are hardwired back to my main switch.  But you could do that without bridging your gateway as well.

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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 351

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

There is no difference where to put your cable modem (gateway) in the house cause usually every room is wired with coax cable. It doesn't matter if you either place your modem in the basement or include extra splitter in the living room near your TV. As long as you use approved splitters (5-1000Mhz at 3.5 loss per output) your signal levels and noise ratio should remain the same.
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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,829

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

That there is no difference is true to a degree.  Unless you have structured wiring, meaning there are two RG6, plus Cat-5e plus Cat3 or 5e runs to every drop, you have no method of backhauling ethernet data to some point where you can distribute it to other points in the house.  It really depends on how the house is wired.  So, although the basement might be the worst place for a wireless router of any type to sit, in this case it might be the most logical in terms of Cat5e distribution throughout the house.