Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 12

Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet


@Datalink wrote:

@forbsy, I can't speak for Rogers or any other ISP in that regard, but I suspect that the response to your first statement would be that its up to the consumer to ensure that their own equipment is capable of running at higher speeds.  There are so many variables to what your asking that it would be impossible to test them all.  Something as simple as swapping out a slower SSD for a high performance SSD might be all it takes to run at higher data rates if you happen to have a limited amount of memory on your pc or laptop.  How many people are comfortable doing laptop surgery to replace the hard drive?  The same applies to swapping out your current memory for larger or faster memory.  ISPs could come out with a blanket statement and say something like the minimum is a gigabit port, core i3 or i5 or better,  8 Gb memory at 1600 Mhz or better, Samsung 840/850 Pro or 950/960 Pro SSD or better.  But, that would also depend on the operating system and what programs you typically run.  I think the reaction from the public would be a minor uproar in any suggested minimum standard. And I think that any suggested minimum standard would be picked apart by a lot of people who are probably above the average consumer, so, that puts the ISPs in a no win situation. Condemned if they say nothing and condemned if they say anything.  There's no winning here, but consumers are going to have to understand, in general, that if they want to run higher data rates, then there is a very good chance that they will have to replace their current equipment.  Coming to the decision point can be somewhat painful and aggravating, trying to prove all along that what they currently use will suffice.  Technology waits for no man as they say, and that is the painful truth of it.  

 

Just to point out, the IEEE very recently approved an ethernet standard which will allow users to run 2.5 or 5 Gb/s over their existing 1 Gb/s Cat 5e/6 ethernet cabling.  

 

http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2016/09/5gbps-ethernet-standard-details-8023bz/

 

When that technology trickles down to routers, pc's and laptops, it will trigger another round of equipment upgrades, but, the same question will still exist, "What's behind the port".  If what ever is behind the port won't support the higher data rates, then the high speed port itself is of little value.  Same situation all over again. So, again, its up to the consumer to educate him, or herself.  

 

You probably won't agree with what I am saying here, but, the general rule that applies is, running higher data rates and demanding programs requires money, money for faster processors, memory and SSDs or Raid Arrays.  There's no getting away with this cheaply, which is rather unfortunate.  


I do have to disagree. I work for a system integration company and we sell within the datacentre. I'm very familiar (as I'm sure you are) with speeds and feeds. Vendors obviusly cannot test every customer situation. There are small, medium, large and enterprise customers to consider with a myriad of infrastructure. No way a vendor could account for all. What they can do is test against minimum specs to achieve stated, advertised performence. 

I know if I purchase a low-end firewall appliance with a certain controller, memory, cache, that I'll be able to achieve a certain level of bandwidth, connections/sec, etc. If I need more from the firewall I can easily check the vendor product page to see what I can get from a specific model.

I refer back to Windows 10. Microsoft always publishes minimum hardware requirements:

 

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/windows-10-on-an-old-pc-when-it-comes-to-specs-how-low-can-you-g...

 

You can choose to pick apart those minimum requirements, but it's what Microsoft has tested , vetted and passed within their labs. If you're a computer zealot and can do better than fine, but as long as there is a vendor standard to work from then the everyday layman will be ok. By publishing a baseline, the vendor can better support the customer because now minimum hardware requirements have been crossed off the troubleshooting list. They can investigate other issues, or perhaps the hardware is faulty. They're not guessing that Windows 10 won't run maybe due to your hardware.

I can guarantee you that when that IEEE standard trickles down, vendors will communicate what's required in the appropriate manner. At least the responsible vendors will.

IMO, publishing minimum baseline around nic, ethernet cable, cpu, memory and disk isn't an impossible excerice for Rogers to do for their Internet packages. It would help both us and them.

 

 

 

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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

Hey guys, I'm curious what's the fastest speeds that wireless supports? I have Gigabit Service using the Rogers Modem. I have a computer that connects to the Router at 1300AC. However all speeds tests come back the same: 450 down, 30up.

 

Is this a limit of WiFi technology, or will a 3rd party router give me faster wireless speeds? I only care about wireless  speeds.

 

I cannot test LAN performance since my computers don't have LAN ports. 

 



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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet


@gp-se wrote:

Hey guys, I'm curious what's the fastest speeds that wireless supports? I have Gigabit Service using the Rogers Modem. I have a computer that connects to the Router at 1300AC. However all speeds tests come back the same: 450 down, 30up.

 

Is this a limit of WiFi technology, or will a 3rd party router give me faster wireless speeds? I only care about wireless  speeds.

 

I cannot test LAN performance since my computers don't have LAN ports. 

 


https://www.cnet.com/how-to/your-router-isnt-as-fast-as-you-think-it-is-heres-why/

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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

@gp-se, let me draw your attention to the following chart, which is the Modulation and Coding Index for 802.11n/ac.

 

http://mcsindex.com/

 

The Spatial Streams refers to the number of antenna on the device in question.  Basically the chart determines what each antenna will transmit, in theory and then just multiplies it for 2, 3, 4, antenna etc.  The Hitron CGNM-3552 supports 80 Mhz wide channels, so, refer to the two columns that indicate 80 Mhz width.  The left is a long guard interval between transmissions, the right is for the short guard interval.  Looking at the Wifi Alliance site, there isn't a test certificate for the CGNM-3552, but there are certificates for the CGNM-2250 and CGNV4 which is used in the UK.  They indicate support for the short guard interval, so, I will assume for the sake of the argument that the CGNM-3552 does as well, so, use the right hand 80 Mhz wide column.  Indicated in blue, at the intersection of 3 antenna at the bottom of the 3 antenna section, and the right hand 80 Mhz column, is a theoretical max transfer rate of 1300 Mb/s.  Take the 256 QAM factor of 5/6 and multiply 1300 x 5/6 = 1083 mb/s as a max "data" transfer rate after the wifi transmit overhead.  Remember that is under absolute ideal conditions. So, in theory, the CGNM-3552 should be able to match its wired transfer rate.

 

Now, the question is, what can your computer handle in terms of the wifi adapter rates, and in terms of anything and everything beyond the adapter, including the processor, memory speed and amount, and hard drive transfer rates in the event that the laptop doesn't have a huge amount of memory.  Just because the adapter can match the Hitrons 1300 Mhz wifi adapter frequency, that doesn't mean that the rest of the pc can keep up with it. But, at the present time, you have two unknowns that you are dealing with, the transfer rate out of the Hitron modem, and the transfer rate inbound for the pc.

 

Looking at your 450 Mb/s number, assuming 802.11ac wifi under the ideal, best transfer conditions, and running the reverse calculation, that would give 450 x 6/5 = 540 Mb/s, which implies that the modem is transmitting on a 40 Mhz channel using the long guard interval.  Its possible that even with an 80 Mhz wide channel selection in the modem, that the modem is reacting to the clear channel check carried out by the pc prior to every modem broadcast to the pc, and is restricting itself to a 40 Mhz wide channel as the upper or lower co-channel is occupied.  If you use inSSIDer to look at your wifi envirnment, you might be able to determine if there is another router on one of the co-channels and if there is a clear channel choice that would give you an open 80 Mhz wide channel.  You can try using Hitrons own wifi scanner which is in the Diagnostics section.  The modem is actually fairly sensitive, so it might surprise you as to how many other modems and routers it can detect.  To use inSSIDer, you would have to use the newest licenced version as the last freebie version doesn't support 802.11ac.  That would be the first step, determine who else is using a 5 Ghz channel nearby, and if there are any 80 Mhz channels that are open.  If so, maybe all you would have to do is change channels.  If the 5 Ghz band is busy, then it won't matter if you did decide to buy a faster router, as the interference will not change, and that would also prevent any other modem or router from running an 80 Mhz wide channel to support faster data rates.  It all depends on who else is out there.

 

Then there is always the question of, can the Hitron modem wifi keep up with its wired data rate.  That is another one of those 64$ million dollar questions.  Thats really an unknown at this point.  When I was running the 250/20 with a CGN3ACSMR, the best I ever saw on a 5 Ghz network was just over 200 Mb/s with a gaming laptop.  That same laptop sees about 440 Mb/s with my Asus RT-AC68U on the gigabit service.  That router connects at 1300 Mhz running 802.11ac, but, the router itself isn't capable of keeping up with the wired rates, which is pretty typical for routers.  

 

The max theoretical short guard rate for the CGNM3CSMR for 802.11n is 450 mb/s x 5/6 = 375 Mb/s for data.  So, the laptop can do that, for some reason the CGN3ACSMR couldn't.  Does that same idea apply to the CGNM-3552?  Good question.  If so, then a new router might be able to transmit a faster data rate.  Perhaps someone with a much newer router can chime in here and indicate what data rates they see from a wifi speedtest.  But, you have to remember that the final data rates are always site dependent.  The rate seen at some other location isn't necessarily what will be seen in your home, even with the same equipment.

 

So, hope this helps. Please excuse the technicalities, but the only way to determine, "can I go faster" is to look at the numbers.  In theory I believe you could, but, that might be shot down by other modems and routers that are running nearby.  Or in other words, good idea, no cigar.....

 

 

If you decide to go router shopping, have a look at the smallnetbuilder site.  If you look at the transfer rates for a lot of the routers on the market, you will see that the test rates are nowhere near the max theoretical rates.  Solution, more antenna to run more data streams.  Thats the only real way to solve it, unless you go to 802.11d which can support much higher data rates.  At the present time there is only one router out that supports 802.11d and I'm not sure if there are any laptops or wifi adapters out for pc's at this point in time.  

 

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/tools/rankers/router/view

 

 



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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

Yup, there we go.  No doubt, for some reason the Hitron data rate is the problem.  Now the question is.... why?



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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

Hello,

 

I did some more speedtests, and this is the fastest I have seen so far @ 3:45 AM LOL with my 1 Gbit profile:

 

speed.jpg

 

Mind you, my PC's are 5 to 8 years old (albeit with Gigabit network card and SSD drives) so I am not sure if that is the issue or not. Transferring files internally using windows homenetwork gets me around 740 mbits on the 8 year old desktop and 960 mbits on the laptop with CAT 6 cabling.

 

Is the Rogers network running slow or is it my PC's?  I have a service ticket open with a tech to check the network speeds but am not sure if they are gonna charge me if they say my systems are too old and their network is fine. How would the avg. user know if their network is fine or over capacity if Rogers don't want to admit it.

 

 

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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

@Alex4161 the only real way to determine if your network pc's or laptops or other devices would be okay at higher data rates is to run an iperf test between them to check the throughput. In the case of your laptop, if your transferring data in or out via the local network above 900 Mb/s, then its reasonable to expect the same from the gigabit service.  If the laptop is the highest performing pc/laptop on your network, then that should be the test device to test data rates thru the modem. 



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I've Been Here Awhile
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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

Is the 50Mbit upstream advertised with the Gigabit package achievable for anyone here? I can't get past 20Mbps and was told by Rogers Support that this was "normal". Not cool.

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I Plan to Stick Around
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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

Rogers should just advertise 100Gbps down and up, and be done with it. They can always use the, "everything looks great from our side. It could be a myriad of things on your side. Its normal to see 30-50% actual speeds".

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Re: Any One Have 1Gbps Download1 50Mbps Upload Yet

I have not used iperf and not sure how to use it.  I just transferred a file from 1 pc to the other and opened task manager in windows 10 and it tells me the network speed in Mbps which seems useful enough.

 

Here is something interesting tho:  When I run the speedtest, the speed I see in the download/upload, is not the same as the Network speed in Task Manager.  i.e.. if speedtest shows me 380 Mbps, task manager shows me over 500 Mbps.  Why is there a difference?