Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

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Mc13
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

Hi, I have Wifi coverage issues at my house, and I want to install a mesh. Since I am going through the hassle, I want to also upgrade to WiFi 6. So I bought TP-Link Deco X20 (AX1800), two units, at a very good good price this black Friday. 

 

Current setup:  I have a CODA 4582U in ROUTER mode connected near where the cable comes in the house, in my lowest level of the house.  I have also work-from-home-during-Covid equipment (home office) - a Linux and a Windows, each connected in the Ethernet ports of the CODA. And I have as well a file+print server in a third Ethernet port of the CODA. BTW, TV is running through 2 nextbox PVRs - no network is needed for that.

 

So I am thinking that, to install the new mesh network, there are at least four solutions, and I would like to ask advice which is the best.

 

SOLUTION 1: CODA in ROUTER mode with WiFi disabled,  Deco_1 in the Ethernet of the CODA (also in ROUTER mode), Work equipment etc... remains in the CODA Ethernet ports, Deco_2 with WiFi backhaul. I think this would work for Internet connection. My work equipment is not under double NAT so its VPN should work. But I understand the WiFi nodes would be double-NATted so there may be some issues for them.

 

SOLUTION 2: Same as Solution 1 with the workaround to add Deco_1 in the DMZ inside the CODA settings. I never used DMZ so I do not know if this even works.

 

SOLUTION 3:  CODA in ROUTER mode with WiFi disabled,  Deco_1 in the Ethernet of the CODA (but in BRIDGE / ACCESS POINT mode), Work equipment etc... remains in the CODA Ethernet ports, Deco_2 with WiFi backhaul. I think this ahuld work - it is my preferred solution because it has minimal changes compared to current topology.  

 

SOLUTION 4:  CODA in BRIDGE mode with WiFi disabled,  Deco_1 in the Ethernet of the CODA (but in ROUTER mode). Deco_2 with WiFi backhaul. Work equipment etc... moves into a Trendnet unmanaged switch which is connected to the spare Deco_1 Ethernet. I think this would also work, not sure if this solution is better than 3 for speed. The advantage is that the TP-Link has much better network management app than the CODA. AT the same time I am nervous to change the CODA to bridge mode, what if it has problems...

  

So the big question is which solution is optimal from the point of view of getting best connection speed for all my equipment? (Maybe there are other solutions I did not think about)

 

And the second question is: if I enable WiFi in the CODA in parallel with the one created by Deco_1 (I guess it must have different SSID, right?),  for solution 3 and 4, will I still see nodes connected to the CODA WiFi from the nodes connected  to the DECO Wifi with different SSID? In theory I should because they are in the same subnet same DNS (since there is only one router - CODA in solution 3, respectively Deco_1 in solution 4).

 

I would appreciate an expert advice!!! Thanks in advance!

 

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Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,184

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

Personal opinion, put the 4582 into Bridge mode with the TP-Link Deco X20 running in full router mode behind the modem.  Once that is done, don't look back. 

 

If your internet service with the 4582 running in Gateway mode is stable, there's no reason to anticipate problems with the 4582 in Bridge mode.  In either case, with the 4582 running in Gateway or Bridge mode, there shouldn't be any difference in wired data rates.  Wifi is a different situation as its dependent on the wifi environment, wifi test device and the capabilities of the router. 

 

As you indicated the TP-Link Deco X20 will give you far greater control over your network, which is the usual situation for a third party router.  And, if you have wifi 6 devices in your home, switching to the TP-Link Deco X20 might make sense, however, don't expect to see a huge data rate increase with wifi 6.  From what I've read, you might not see much of a change, despite the advertised numbers.  So, nothing ventured, nothing gained as they say.  The only way to find out is to give it a try. 

 

So, with the modem in Bridge mode and the TP-Link Deco X20 in full router mode behind it, that would then connect to an unmanaged gigabit switch, and then to the follow on devices, as you indicated. 

 

With the modem in Gateway mode, connect and set up the TP-Link Deco X20 and follow on gigabit switch.  That keeps the TP-Link Deco X20 protected while you're setting it up.  First order of business is to check for and install any firmware updates, followed by a reboot.  Run a factory reset after the reboot which will probably lead to another reboot.  The factory reset should result in clearing the current NVRAM data.  After that's all done, set up the router and network.  When all is said and done, keep the routers web page up so that you can reboot the router, but not just yet.  With another tab open, log into the modem using 192.168.0.1, navigate to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION and disable the Residential Gateway function.  Save the changes which will cause the modem to commence a reboot into Bridge mode.  When that reboot has started, reboot the router as well.  In the end, you should be end up with the modem in Bridge mode and the router with an external WAN address, running in router mode.

 

Keep in mind, when the router is in Gateway mode, you need to use 192.168.0.1 to log into the modem. 

 

When the modem is in Bridge mode, you need to use 192.168.100.1 to log into the modem.  In Bridge mode, the user interface options are limited to those functions that are accessible and related to Bridge mode operation. 

 

If you want to kick the modem back into Gateway mode, log into the modem, thru the router, using 192.168.100.1, navigate back to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION and enable the Residential Gateway function.  Save the changes and the modem will reboot back into  GATEWAY mode with its previous settings intact. 

 

If for any reason you can't get the modem back into GATEWAY mode from Bridge mode, there is always the factory reset option for the modem.  Hold the recessed reset button at the back of the modem down for 30 seconds and release it.  That will initiate the factory reset and automatic reboot back into Gateway mode. 

 

Alternatively, you can call tech support to kick the modem back into Gateway mode if you're having problems doing it.

 

One major point to keep in mind at the present time:  the 4582 is now running a new firmware version with an updated kernel to run DOCSIS 3.1 upstream.  DOCSIS 3.1 downstream has been running since Mar 2017 and now DOCSIS 3.1 upstream is making its appearance in various places across the network.  Its not rolled out network wide as of yet, but Rogers is making steady progress. 

 

The one problem with version 7.x is that the modem might fail to respond to login attempts.  If that happens, pull the power from the modem, wait for 10 to 15 seconds and plug it back in to force a modem restart.  That should resolve the login failure situation.  That applies to either mode, GATEWAY or BRIDGE mode.

 

When you initially set up the router with the modem in Gateway mode, don't set up IPV6.  Wait until the modem is in Bridge mode and the router is running behind it.  Set up IPV6 if you prefer to have it running and then reboot the router which will enable a negotiation / assignment of the routers IPV6 prefix from the Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS).  Rogers uses Native IPV6.  There is a post here in the forum by @RogersDave which details the IPV6 settings for various routers.  I don't have that available at the moment as an errant Microsoft Windows update has completely trashed my pc (grrrrrr &*&*&).

 

When you set up the router, ensure that the modem and router are separated by a few feet.  Although the 4582 has been updated to include better shielding over the cable tuner, which is to avoid EMI affects from wifi, its a good practice to keep them separate so that there won't be any untoward EMI affects on the modem from a nearby wifi transmitter. 

 

As for the question about dual modem and router wifi operation, you should keep them separated, in terms of their channel numbers.  2.4 Ghz doesn't leave much choice, channels 1, 6 or 11, so, I'd set the modem to channel 1 and the router to channel 11.  For the 5 Ghz I'd set the modem to channel 36 and the router to channel 149 or higher.  Note that channel 36 and the lower group of channels is restricted to 50 or 200 milli-watts max power output while channel 149 and the higher channel group is allowed to run 1 watt max power.  That higher power level will result in a considerable difference in network performance. 

 

The networks broadcast by the modem and router should have different SSIDs. 

 

If you were running the modem and router with different wifi networks, as long as you're running the same subnet, you should be able to see all of the devices on the network.  To do that you would probably have to run DECO_1 in a quasi Access Point mode.  To do that you would set DECO_1 to run in full router mode with its firewall and DHCP server disabled.  That leaves the modem to provide both as it would be running in GATEWAY mode.  The question I have is whether or not the second TP-Link Deco X20 will run as a mesh node?  Are there any effects on node operation when the primary router has its firewall and DHCP server disabled?   Or, can you set the primary DECO_1 to run in Access Point mode with DECO_2 as a node?  You will have to do some research on that one.  That gets back to my original opinion, bridge the modem and run DECO_1 in full router mode. 

 

Fwiw I run my 4582 in Bridge mode with an Asus RT-AC86U behind it.  We live in a pretty stable area so I never think about the 4582.  I run fixed location devices via ethernet as the house is wired for ethernet, cable and telephone.  That includes fixed location desktops, laptops, Nvidea Shield, etc, etc.  The mobile devices don't have any issues except for the very far corner of the basement, which makes sense given that the router is on the main floor at the other end of the house.  I'm thinking about that one......  We're probably pretty typical, working from home, remote learning from Carleton U, streaming, gaming, etc.  No complaints except for that one location which doesn't get a lot of use.  So, if your internet service is stable in Gateway mode, I wouldn't expect any changes when the modem is in Bridge mode.  The only caveat to that would be if there was some strange idiosyncrasy between the modem and the TP-Link Deco X20, but that would be apparent fairly quickly. 

 

One more food for thought item, does your home have structured wiring, which is a wire bundle that runs from the structured wiring cabinet (usually in the basement) to each room upstairs?  That bundle usually contains two RG-6 cables for cable tv or satellite, one Cat 5 or 5e cable for internet purposes, and one Cat 3 (possibly another Cat 5/5e) cable for telephones.  If you've never taken a cable / telephone wallplate off the wall to inspect behind it, give that a go, just to see what's there.  That is of course unless you already know that there isn't any other cabling installed in the walls.  For home owners who have never checked, its worth the minute or two that it takes to determine if there are any cables tucked in behind the wallplate.  If you have ethernet cabling for example, that data distribution / access around the house much easier to accomplish. 

 

Hope this helps.  Let me know if you have any more questions. 

 

 



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All Replies
Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,184

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

Personal opinion, put the 4582 into Bridge mode with the TP-Link Deco X20 running in full router mode behind the modem.  Once that is done, don't look back. 

 

If your internet service with the 4582 running in Gateway mode is stable, there's no reason to anticipate problems with the 4582 in Bridge mode.  In either case, with the 4582 running in Gateway or Bridge mode, there shouldn't be any difference in wired data rates.  Wifi is a different situation as its dependent on the wifi environment, wifi test device and the capabilities of the router. 

 

As you indicated the TP-Link Deco X20 will give you far greater control over your network, which is the usual situation for a third party router.  And, if you have wifi 6 devices in your home, switching to the TP-Link Deco X20 might make sense, however, don't expect to see a huge data rate increase with wifi 6.  From what I've read, you might not see much of a change, despite the advertised numbers.  So, nothing ventured, nothing gained as they say.  The only way to find out is to give it a try. 

 

So, with the modem in Bridge mode and the TP-Link Deco X20 in full router mode behind it, that would then connect to an unmanaged gigabit switch, and then to the follow on devices, as you indicated. 

 

With the modem in Gateway mode, connect and set up the TP-Link Deco X20 and follow on gigabit switch.  That keeps the TP-Link Deco X20 protected while you're setting it up.  First order of business is to check for and install any firmware updates, followed by a reboot.  Run a factory reset after the reboot which will probably lead to another reboot.  The factory reset should result in clearing the current NVRAM data.  After that's all done, set up the router and network.  When all is said and done, keep the routers web page up so that you can reboot the router, but not just yet.  With another tab open, log into the modem using 192.168.0.1, navigate to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION and disable the Residential Gateway function.  Save the changes which will cause the modem to commence a reboot into Bridge mode.  When that reboot has started, reboot the router as well.  In the end, you should be end up with the modem in Bridge mode and the router with an external WAN address, running in router mode.

 

Keep in mind, when the router is in Gateway mode, you need to use 192.168.0.1 to log into the modem. 

 

When the modem is in Bridge mode, you need to use 192.168.100.1 to log into the modem.  In Bridge mode, the user interface options are limited to those functions that are accessible and related to Bridge mode operation. 

 

If you want to kick the modem back into Gateway mode, log into the modem, thru the router, using 192.168.100.1, navigate back to the BASIC .... GATEWAY FUNCTION and enable the Residential Gateway function.  Save the changes and the modem will reboot back into  GATEWAY mode with its previous settings intact. 

 

If for any reason you can't get the modem back into GATEWAY mode from Bridge mode, there is always the factory reset option for the modem.  Hold the recessed reset button at the back of the modem down for 30 seconds and release it.  That will initiate the factory reset and automatic reboot back into Gateway mode. 

 

Alternatively, you can call tech support to kick the modem back into Gateway mode if you're having problems doing it.

 

One major point to keep in mind at the present time:  the 4582 is now running a new firmware version with an updated kernel to run DOCSIS 3.1 upstream.  DOCSIS 3.1 downstream has been running since Mar 2017 and now DOCSIS 3.1 upstream is making its appearance in various places across the network.  Its not rolled out network wide as of yet, but Rogers is making steady progress. 

 

The one problem with version 7.x is that the modem might fail to respond to login attempts.  If that happens, pull the power from the modem, wait for 10 to 15 seconds and plug it back in to force a modem restart.  That should resolve the login failure situation.  That applies to either mode, GATEWAY or BRIDGE mode.

 

When you initially set up the router with the modem in Gateway mode, don't set up IPV6.  Wait until the modem is in Bridge mode and the router is running behind it.  Set up IPV6 if you prefer to have it running and then reboot the router which will enable a negotiation / assignment of the routers IPV6 prefix from the Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS).  Rogers uses Native IPV6.  There is a post here in the forum by @RogersDave which details the IPV6 settings for various routers.  I don't have that available at the moment as an errant Microsoft Windows update has completely trashed my pc (grrrrrr &*&*&).

 

When you set up the router, ensure that the modem and router are separated by a few feet.  Although the 4582 has been updated to include better shielding over the cable tuner, which is to avoid EMI affects from wifi, its a good practice to keep them separate so that there won't be any untoward EMI affects on the modem from a nearby wifi transmitter. 

 

As for the question about dual modem and router wifi operation, you should keep them separated, in terms of their channel numbers.  2.4 Ghz doesn't leave much choice, channels 1, 6 or 11, so, I'd set the modem to channel 1 and the router to channel 11.  For the 5 Ghz I'd set the modem to channel 36 and the router to channel 149 or higher.  Note that channel 36 and the lower group of channels is restricted to 50 or 200 milli-watts max power output while channel 149 and the higher channel group is allowed to run 1 watt max power.  That higher power level will result in a considerable difference in network performance. 

 

The networks broadcast by the modem and router should have different SSIDs. 

 

If you were running the modem and router with different wifi networks, as long as you're running the same subnet, you should be able to see all of the devices on the network.  To do that you would probably have to run DECO_1 in a quasi Access Point mode.  To do that you would set DECO_1 to run in full router mode with its firewall and DHCP server disabled.  That leaves the modem to provide both as it would be running in GATEWAY mode.  The question I have is whether or not the second TP-Link Deco X20 will run as a mesh node?  Are there any effects on node operation when the primary router has its firewall and DHCP server disabled?   Or, can you set the primary DECO_1 to run in Access Point mode with DECO_2 as a node?  You will have to do some research on that one.  That gets back to my original opinion, bridge the modem and run DECO_1 in full router mode. 

 

Fwiw I run my 4582 in Bridge mode with an Asus RT-AC86U behind it.  We live in a pretty stable area so I never think about the 4582.  I run fixed location devices via ethernet as the house is wired for ethernet, cable and telephone.  That includes fixed location desktops, laptops, Nvidea Shield, etc, etc.  The mobile devices don't have any issues except for the very far corner of the basement, which makes sense given that the router is on the main floor at the other end of the house.  I'm thinking about that one......  We're probably pretty typical, working from home, remote learning from Carleton U, streaming, gaming, etc.  No complaints except for that one location which doesn't get a lot of use.  So, if your internet service is stable in Gateway mode, I wouldn't expect any changes when the modem is in Bridge mode.  The only caveat to that would be if there was some strange idiosyncrasy between the modem and the TP-Link Deco X20, but that would be apparent fairly quickly. 

 

One more food for thought item, does your home have structured wiring, which is a wire bundle that runs from the structured wiring cabinet (usually in the basement) to each room upstairs?  That bundle usually contains two RG-6 cables for cable tv or satellite, one Cat 5 or 5e cable for internet purposes, and one Cat 3 (possibly another Cat 5/5e) cable for telephones.  If you've never taken a cable / telephone wallplate off the wall to inspect behind it, give that a go, just to see what's there.  That is of course unless you already know that there isn't any other cabling installed in the walls.  For home owners who have never checked, its worth the minute or two that it takes to determine if there are any cables tucked in behind the wallplate.  If you have ethernet cabling for example, that data distribution / access around the house much easier to accomplish. 

 

Hope this helps.  Let me know if you have any more questions. 

 

 



View solution in original post

Mc13
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

Thanks @Datalink for the quick and detailed answer! I think I will follow your suggestion and put the 4582 in bridge mode. If you were running with it stable I might as well try, I think the Deco looks like it will have better parental control, etc.. which I need for the kids when they don't behave. Thanks for the detailed instructions for how to move 4582 to bridge (I didn't know how to do that exactly), and the order in which to set up the router, it's good to have that than trial and error., it will probably save me a lot of time.

 

I'll receive the Deco on Wednesday (they seem to be slower due to the Black Friday) so as soon as I install it I will post back here to share.

 

Unfortunately my condo townhouse is built in the 70's and there is no Ethernet wiring 😞 There is only phone cable. I guess the other option would have been MoCA and access point - I was thinking to use that - but I will give the Mesh a try now obviously now that I bought it.

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,184

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

I wouldn't have second thoughts about going MoCA.  I guess it depends on what you're trying to accomplish, good wifi performance, or, good ethernet performance or some mix of the two.  I'd go MoCa to run higher data rates and run a mesh network with ethernet running for both front haul and back haul paths.  That ethernet path would be over the MoCA network.  Personal opinion, there's just way too many users struggling with mesh networks, but, its really dependent on your wifi environment, how well you understand that environment and how much time you spend fine tuning the mesh network performance.  There's more to a mesh network than meets the eye, so to speak.  Patience, and understanding are really important when your trying to improve a mesh network.  

 

Thankfully our house is wired 🙂  Who knew that would become so important one day?



Mc13
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

Datalink thanks again! Your help is invaluable. Outstanding, 11 on a scale of 1 to 10.

 

Just wanted to give some feedback to you and others regarding MoCA. RESOUNDING SUCCESS! I bought the MoCA 2.5 Actiontec ECB6250, they worked right out of the box. They provide Gigabit Ethernet. Ping adds 3 msec over the MoCA bridge using wired. Can't test well the gigabit as I have not so good laptops 🙂 Unlimited for what I can tell (i.e. limited by my laptops). I tested them initially with 2 laptops and one coax through 1 splitter. Then I installed them at their final locations and they synced worked right away.

 

I did not even install the PoE Filter yet (PoE vs POE threw me off: Point of Entry - not Power Over Ethernet, at first I was like . how can the filter providing POE) . I will install it soon but I have to move a large closet to do so. I understand I need to do it for security or else I have my Ethernet exposed via the cable going out of my house. Till then I will turn the power off to the Actiontec devices although I doubt anyone is plugged in (if I turn one Actiontec off, the light goes down which means none of my neighbours is sniffing...). 

 

Also I am glad I invested for the second Actiontec for MoCA. Two reasons:

a. I don't want to stress the CODA 8542U to do MoCA at the expense of bridging, routing, etc.

b. I don't want to limit MoCA to 2.0 for the link between my routers.

 

Finally, I might keep the Rogers as router and turn off the firewall in the Asus router (yes I replaced the two Deco units with a GT-AC2900). So far no one complained about double NAT 🙂 other than me knowing I can initiate connections in one direction only.  At the end of this futzing around I also have to say that the CODA 4582U is an excellent device, considering I had it for a while and it is not new - I am impressed. Better than the Decos by a mile. Faster on wired and way better Wifi, in addition to more control . Bravo Rogers on that one.

 

Mc13
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Advice needed for installing a wifi mesh

@Datalink, this is the final MoCA setup = works & Internet stable - PoE filter installed
------------------------------------------------------------
Rogers (wall coax) -> PoE Filter -> Initial Splitter IS(splitsx2)
IS->SplitterA(3)-> HD Explorer-TV1
                             -> CODA Modem
                             -> MoCA_Adapter1 => CODA (MODEM/ROUTER)
IS->long cable -> SplitterB(2)-> NextBox
                                                     -> MoCA_Adapter2 => Asus AC2900 ROUTER
------------------------------------------------------------
Basically using the MoCA for a high speed backbone connection to router. I could expand this later with extra adapter but no need for now. You can see why MoCA and mesh was the only solution ("long cable" is going through finished walls/ceilings/floor incl. cinder blocks, ducts and duct returns in the way). But MoCA trumps . I can also add a cheap Asus Aimesh node later, and/or expand the MoCA but no need for now.

There is only one quirky thing I noticed: related to signal strength. There seems to be significant attenuation on a few receive QAM channels on the CODA modem. The attenuation seems to be less with MoCA adapters in the network and PoE added (???why???) In fact the numbers look better with the MoCA internal network installed. What can we make out of it? The modem works at max speed (capped by my plan). I will ask the family later if cable was affected (I am not a big cable watcher...). And adding the PoE filter increased the output signal of the modem by 2 dBmV.

Below is the signal with just the modem (no MoCA connected, no POE) and then the "better" signal with PoE and Moca running live.

=======================

No-MOCA adapter, no PoE Filter
================================
1 591000000 QAM256 -10.400 7 34.925
2 597000000 QAM256 -14.500 8 33.376
3 603000000 QAM256 -9.700 9 36.609
4 849000000 QAM256 -7.500 2 36.609
5 855000000 QAM256 -11.500 3 35.083
6 861000000 QAM256 -15.099 4 32.584
7 579000000 QAM256 -3.400 5 40.366
8 585000000 QAM256 -5.299 6 38.983
9 279000000 QAM256 -1.200 1 40.946
10 609000000 QAM256 -6.700 10 38.983
11 615000000 QAM256 -7.000 11 38.983
12 621000000 QAM256 -5.299 12 38.983
13 633000000 QAM256 -2.400 13 38.983
14 639000000 QAM256 -1.700 14 40.366
15 645000000 QAM256 0.799 15 40.366
16 651000000 QAM256 -0.299 16 40.366
17 657000000 QAM256 0.200 17 40.366
18 663000000 QAM256 -0.299 18 40.366
19 669000000 QAM256 0.799 19 40.946
20 675000000 QAM256 0.700 20 40.366
21 681000000 QAM256 1.299 21 40.366
22 687000000 QAM256 0.599 22 40.946
23 693000000 QAM256 0.799 23 40.366
24 699000000 QAM256 0.000 24 40.366
25 705000000 QAM256 -0.900 25 40.366
26 711000000 QAM256 -2.599 26 40.366
27 717000000 QAM256 -3.799 27 37.355
28 723000000 QAM256 -9.299 28 30.532
29 825000000 QAM256 0.599 29 40.366
30 831000000 QAM256 -0.799 30 40.366
31 837000000 QAM256 -2.299 31 38.983
32 843000000 QAM256 -5.299 32 38.605
OFDM Downstream Overview
Receiver FFT type Subcarr 0 Frequency(MHz) PLC locked NCP locked MDC1 locked PLC power(dBmv)
0 NA NA NO NO NO NA
1 4K 275600000 YES YES YES -4.900002
Upstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Bandwidth
1 32300000 64QAM 41.520 3 6400000
2 38700000 64QAM 41.770 4 6400000
3 21100000 64QAM 39.760 1 3200000
4 25900000 64QAM 41.770 2 6400000
5 0 QAM_NONE - --- 1600000
6 0 QAM_NONE - --- 1600000
7 0 QAM_NONE - --- 1600000
8 0 QAM_NONE - --- 1600000

 

2xMoCA adapters connected, PoE Filter installed
===============================================
Downstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Signal noise ratio (dB)
1 651000000 QAM256 -0.900 16 40.366
2 591000000 QAM256 -0.599 7 40.366
3 597000000 QAM256 -2.500 8 38.983
4 849000000 QAM256 -11.400 2 35.779
5 855000000 QAM256 -9.299 3 36.609
6 861000000 QAM256 -8.299 4 37.636
7 579000000 QAM256 0.299 5 40.946
8 585000000 QAM256 0.299 6 40.946
9 603000000 QAM256 -4.799 9 38.605
10 609000000 QAM256 -8.400 10 37.355
11 615000000 QAM256 -11.099 11 36.386
12 621000000 QAM256 -8.799 12 37.636
13 633000000 QAM256 -3.900 13 38.983
14 639000000 QAM256 -2.799 14 40.366
15 645000000 QAM256 0.000 15 40.366
16 279000000 QAM256 -3.200 1 40.366
17 657000000 QAM256 -0.299 17 40.366
18 663000000 QAM256 -0.799 18 40.366
19 669000000 QAM256 0.599 19 40.366
20 675000000 QAM256 0.500 20 40.946
21 681000000 QAM256 1.200 21 40.946
22 687000000 QAM256 0.299 22 40.946
23 693000000 QAM256 0.599 23 40.366
24 699000000 QAM256 0.099 24 40.366
25 705000000 QAM256 -0.200 25 40.366
26 711000000 QAM256 -1.000 26 40.366
27 717000000 QAM256 -1.400 27 40.366
28 723000000 QAM256 -4.599 28 36.386
29 825000000 QAM256 -1.200 29 38.983
30 831000000 QAM256 -3.500 30 38.983
31 837000000 QAM256 -7.000 31 37.636
32 843000000 QAM256 -9.700 32 36.386
OFDM Downstream Overview
Receiver FFT type Subcarr 0 Frequency(MHz) PLC locked NCP locked MDC1 locked PLC power(dBmv)
0 NA NA NO NO NO NA
1 4K 275600000 YES YES YES -3.400002
Upstream Overview
Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Channel ID Bandwidth
1 38700000 64QAM 43.020 4 6400000
2 21100000 64QAM 41.260 1 3200000
3 32300000 64QAM 43.020 3 6400000
4 25900000 64QAM 43.020 2 6400000

...