5G Network not broadcasting

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

I have the Hitron CGN3ACSMR moden / Wireless router with my Rogers Ignite 100u.

 

On a few of my devices, the 5G wifi stream is shown, but "Not in range". "Rogers#####-5G Not in range"

It isn't even detected on my Windows 8 laptop and I'm within 6 feet of the modem. Not in range?

 

Am I missing an important setting?

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,740

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

If you have a saved profile for the network.. delete it and try to connect again.
(most reports i have seen with this issue (generally android devices), that is the usually solution they say).

 

 

As for your laptop not connecting.  If it doesnt even see it.. its likely that the laptop doesnt have a 5ghz card in it.
Laptop makers are CHEAP.. they will often cheap out and not put in dual band card.. (some still only come with 10/100 network cards, not gigabit)



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

Thanks for the reply.

 

Removed the profile for the 5G WiFi connection on my Android, but  now not only can I not connect, neither the 2.4 nor the 5) are even being detected on my Android.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,740

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

Yikes.. something definately is up.

I would reboot the modem to start, may clear it up.

 

Also, i would log into the modem after its back up (via something that can connect to it) and change them from the default names (and passwords)



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

Hey GdKitty, rebooting the modem appears have done the trick.

Thank you for the suggestion and the advice!

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

5G Network not broadcasting

This has become a regular probem: Our Rogers Hitron router regularly ceases to broadcast its 5G signal. The Ethernet still works, as does the 2G network. The 2G and 5G each have distinctive names and we've successfully run both types of networks with our existing router and computers/tablets/phones for a couple of years (although we regularly have to replace dead Rogers routers). Rebooting the router restores the 5G signal but after a while (hours or days) it stops broadcasting. Sometimes the 5G indicator remains lighted, sometimes it goes out when the signal quits. When the 5G stops broadcasting we lose the 5G connection on all our devices: desktop, 3 laptops, 3 phones (a Samsung, an LG, and an iPhone), a Roku 3, a Chromecast, a printer... you get the idea; It's the router.

 

Any fix? Or just trudge back to Rogers for another modem. If there are any in stock...

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,877

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

We have seen a few similar occurrences within recent history, and, surprisingly enough, the problem has turned out to be with the remote devices, and not the modem.  Is this a CGN3ACSMR as seen by the product sticker at the back of the modem?  Step one would be to replace the router on the chance that it actually has a problem with the 5 Ghz transmitter.  One failure I would believe, two or three, nope.  You should be buying lottery tickets in that case.  Step two, if you have already done that, start isolating each device on that network, one by one, until you find the device that is causing the problem.  Just to note, its strange that you would have to keep replacing modems.  I've only had two, a CGN3 and CGN3ACSMR and the only reason I had to replace the CNG3 at one point was from a failed experiment with the Cisco Setup USB key that accompanies the modem.  Other than that, both of them have been pretty solid in terms of their uptime.  I run the modem in Bridge mode with an Asus RT-AC68U router, so, the router basically does all the work, but, its been a solid combination for a good number of months.

 

Here is some food for thought just to see if you are competing with anyone else in the 5 Ghz band. Load inSSIDer on your laptop, which is a wifi monitoring application. When loaded on a dual band laptop, inSSIDer will monitor both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks that can be detected by your laptop. Have a look to see what you're competing with in both bands.  After you have a look at the display, you might be able to determine if there is any other 5 Ghz network that is causing problems for you.  Never know unless you have a look, using something such as inSSIDer. The program link below is for the last freebie version. A new version is out now that will handle 802.11ac networks in the 5 Ghz band, and which will work on a 802.11n laptop. The new version will read the broadcast management frames and display the 802.11ac networks that are running in the 5 Ghz band. Its worth the $20 U.S. to buy, so that you can see all of the networks that are nearby.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

What you want to see on the graphical display is that your network is the highest network shown, which indicates that it has the highest received power of all the received networks. Generally you want somewhere in the neighborhood of 40 to 45 dBmW separation between your network and any other network that is on the same or overlapping channel. So, while your network should be the tallest on the display, everthing else should be well below yours. When that power level separation decreases, you end up with interference and possibly with problems maintaining a wifi network. Your only option is to change to a channel with less overlap from the competition.   For your 5 Ghz devices look at channels 149 and higher. If you can switch to any of those channels, do so, as the output power for those channels is higher, resulting in better signal levels, signal to noise ratios and data rates.

 

Fwiw, the Hitron modem is not a great wifi performer, and does not support beamforming, which is part of the 802.11ac spec.  That allows the modem/router to aim a focused signal towards the laptop/device, etc, etc.  The result is better signal levels, signal to noise ratios and data rates at the device.  All in all, better wifi performance.  Depending on your network, you might want to consider using your router which will probably give you better wifi performance and run the modem in Bridge mode.  It just depends on the age of your router and whether or not it has external antenna.

 

Edit:  When you replaced the modem, did you replace the power adapter as well?  They should be changed out together, just in case there is an issue with the power adapter.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

I'll go through your points one by one:

 

It is a CGN3ACSMR.

 

I've had several Rogers modem/routers fail. Believe what you like. Rogers confirmed their failure and replaced them. On one occassion a tech delivered a new router, hooked it up, and it wouldn't connect right out of the box.

 

I could try isolating each device, but first I'd like some idea of how one device can cause the router's 5G to stop broadcasting altogether. When the same devices are all switched over to the 2G there's never a problem. Swapping out devices is going to be a huge pain, too. On top of the devices I mentioned there are also numerous security cameras. I can't leave devices disconnected for hours or days while I wait to see if the 5G goes down again. And how will I determine whether the router failed because that device was connected and not because of an internal fault?

 

I run both inSSIDer and NetSpot (free) and there's nothing anywhere near my 5G channel and only a very weak signal near my 2G channel.

 

I only have the Rogers router/modem so I have nothing to bridge to.

 

Thanks for the indepth reply. I've always found the Rogers router/modem a bit lackluster so I might get a new one, but also invest in a quality router for my wifi.

 

 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,877

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

Hi,

 

Not questioning the failure rate that you've seen so far.  Just pointing out the cases that I've seen where users have come to the forum with repeated modem failures.  When I've asked them to run through a series of checks, one by one, its turned out that the modem wasn't at fault which was probably a surprise to everyone.  When you look at the modem there isn't much to check.  There is:

 

1.  The power adapter and what its plugged into;

2.  The cable signal levels;

3.  The connected devices, both ethernet and wifi;

4.  The positioning of the modem.  It should be sitting upright and not located in a closed in space where it can possibly overheat. 

 

Is the power adapter plugged into a power bar of any type?  If so, can you run an experiment, which is to run it from a wall socket or extension cord if necessary for a period of time where you usually see a failure.   Disconnect the power bar completely from all equipment and the wall socket.  Power bars contain metal oxide varistors in many cases to prevent any voltage spikes from damaging connected equipment.  When the varistor starts to break down, as they can, they can emit a considerable amount of RF noise, enough to cause problems with connected equipment.  

 

Can you log into the modem, navigate to the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and copy them into this thread.  When you copy the tables you can grab the text contents and paste that into the thread, so you don't have to run a screen capture and store that somewhere and link it.

 

From what we've seen, it would appear that when a connected device, either ethernet or wifi has a failing port, or port controller, either one of those fails in some manner that it prevents the modem from communicating with other devices, appearing as if the modem has failed.  Without seeing those failed components one can only speculate what the cause might be, might be an aging device that finally decides to fail, possibly there was a manufacturing problem from day one that has finally started to fail, might be an interface issue with the host motherboard that has arisen, etc.  There are probably many reasons for the port or port controller to fail, but, the end result stops the modem from communicating with everything else on that network, or it causes the modem to stop communicating on all networks, wired and wifi.  Its possible that the modem might be lacking in self protection capability that other modems or routers might have, and is more susceptible to issues with rogue ports or port controllers, but that's just speculation on my part. 

 

What I've asked Hitron modem users with this problem to do, is to power down all of the devices on a given network, one at a time until the offending device is found.  Yes, that's a pain, but, repeated failures of different modems, one after another doesn't make any sense either.  And, from what we've seen so far, troubleshooting this problem, step by step, one external device at a time has proven successful.  No doubt its frustrating, but that appears to be the only way to finally determine what the problem is.  In terms of failure times, what we've seen is a failure occuring within a timespan of several hours, so that was easier to sort out.  A single failure every few days would be a pain, no doubt about it.  Is also possible that some update to that remote device has done something to the communications controller software or has changed a setting in some manner that this failure occurs, but, you wouldn't be able to determine that until the specific device is located and you've had a chance to examine the communications settings.

 

Hope this helps...



I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: 5G Network not broadcasting

The 5G signal on the router is not flashing as well. I can only fix this by turn it off and start it over again. I'm wondering is there have anything to fix it or this is the way it works?

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