4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 123

4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

About a month my router started giving me issues (Netgear Nighthawk AC1900). LAN speeds weren't consistent among all the ethernet ports so I donated to a friend and downgraded to only the Roger Hitron Modem. The package I have is the 250 ignite btw.

 

Since relying on ONLY the Rogers modem I immediately began experiencing a ton of issues. Starting with my online Xbox experience. I noticed I was having group chat problems. Which led into problems connecting to online games. I found I had to resort to making a ton of port forwarding changes which worked temporarily. Then led to opening my DMZ for my Xbox One. Which later led to creating static IP's, which led to multiple router reboots a week then a day. Now here's the funny part. All around the same time 3 of my Xbox friends all had similar connectivity issues. All with Rogers, all live in Toronto. Rogers denied any type of coincidence. 

 

But we all ended up having to open ports, DCHP, DMZ's ect. And then rebooting our routers became a regular part of life. One day one of us would have no problem connecting and the other one of us would have problems. It was always one of us. And I reminsiced about how I never had these problems when I had it in bridge mode. I also use Plex Media Server and since relying on the Hitron modem I was forced to use a static IP and open ports to connect to it. This wasn't something I had to do when I used my Netgear modem. 

 

So after countless hours, reboots and modem swaps I finally bit the bullet and bought another router. This time it was the ASUS AC3100. Bridged the Hitron over to it and everything JUST worked. No issues, no fiddling with router settings, no rebooting. Xbox Live works perfect, Plex works without port forwarding and wifi speeds increased by 100GBPS upstairs. I'd suggest to anyone having issues do the same.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,140

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

@lundon44 the simpler solution would be to load Xwrt-Vortex on your R7000.  That is the Asus-WRT firmware ported over to the R7000.  There are others on the forum who use that as well.  Here's the link. 

 

http://xvtx.ru/xwrt/about.htm

 

The only problem that I have with this is the fact that its hosted on a Russian server. 

 

I suspect that your problems might have been a combination of the IPV6 ICMP filtering that is prevalent in the Netgear routers and perhaps some IPV6 issue with a server that is downstream of the CMTS.  The Asus default for IPV6 is disabled, so, that would put you in a configuration as it was prior to Rogers enabling IPV6 across the network. 

 

Did you enable IPV6 in the router?

 

One point to look out for is the NAT Acceleration.  That is located in LAN .... SWITCH CONTROL.  For any service above 100 Mb/s, that does have to be enabled.  That is actually Broadcom's Cut Through Forwarding, essentially port to port forwarding without the use of the CPU, or very little.  It is not compatible with various functions such as Traffic Monitoring, traditional QOS and others.  If you do enable something that is not compatible, that funtion will disable the NAT Acceleration and your data rate throughput will drop as a result.  



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,942

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

As for PMS

Generally it DOES need port forwarding.

But it does work with UPNP.  So if you have UPNP enabled on your 3rd party router, when PMS needs to connect out, it will talk to the router and set up the port automatically.

With UPNP off, it needs to be forwarded manually.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

Have the exact same issue. Spoke with Customer Relations last night, and the Customer Relations guy said he also had that issue.  He said he spent hours with their tech team to try to figure out the cause, and they eventually settled on shoving the Hitron into bridge mode, buying a router, and that seemed to work ~95% of the time.  But wow $299 for the ASUS AC3100 is a lot of money to be able to casually play the XBox One.

 

Of course prior to getting that guy at Customer Relations I literally spent days talking with Microsoft, Rogers, EA support... and everyone's deflecting blame, so it's impossible to properly diagnose the problem.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,140

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

There is a simple answer to this.  There is an internal wrap-around or redirect that has to occur in order for two consoles to play against each other via the same modem or router.  That is typically found on high end routers.  The official network terminology escapes me at the moment but there is a term for it.  That would have to be built into the firmware with a user option to enable it.  So, its actually not that common on routers and modems.  Its almost like a loopback, but in this case you wrap-around to a different port.

 

Possibly @mozerd might know what I'm referring to.  



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

Thanks.  If you or someone can figure out what specific terminology that is then I'll look for 3rd party routers with it.

 

P.S. If it's such a simple answer you'd think someone would've suggested that after literally spending days with MS, Rogers, & EA support.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,140

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

I believe its actually part of the TCP/IP RFC, so its built into the specifications, but, there is absolutely no mention of it on the xbox support pages.  Its pretty simple in concept, but, it has to be coded into the firmware.

 

 

After looking around, the term is: Hairpinning

 

That would allow traffic to run internally.  That might be possible with a Microtick or PfSense router, but that requires some research to determine.  

 

Just thinking about this, with IPV6 up and running, you should be able to do this and not worry about IPV4 NAT states or Hairpinning.  If you bring up Microsoft Edge on the xbox, and go to ipv6-test.com, that should tell you if you have full IPV6 connectivity.  From what I understand thats the only way to determine if IPV6 is available on the xbox.  If it is, then running multiple xboxs should work.  The fly in the ointment from what I can see is that there isn't any means to determine what path the xbox decides to use, which would be one of IPV4, IPV6, or Teredo.  If you could force the Xbox to use IPV6, then in theory, this wouldn't be an issue.  Unfortunately the Xbox determines what path to use based on its own internal criteria. 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?


@Datalink wrote:

Possibly @mozerd might know what I'm referring to.  


I have succeeded in getting a mix of 4 gaming consoles to work effectively under one roof. I use Routers made by Ubiguiti all of which incorporate the ability to utilize ACL with UPnP2. The TRICK is to block the external port that xBox or PlayStation are expecting to use which forces either to change their port assignment coming INTO the interface for the game in question. There are also some other mandatory adjustments I implement to protect the network from upnp hackers plus how IP addresses are assigned to the consoles via DHCP.

 

Following is my ACL code example that I use for 2 xboxes:

upnp2 {
        acl {
            rule 10 {
                action deny
                description "Block Port 3074 to Force a Different Port For Xbox"
                external-port 3074
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.20.0/24
            }
            rule 15 {
                action deny
                description "Block Port 4500 to Force a Different Port For ATC"
                external-port 4500
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.20.0/24
            }
            rule 20 {
                action allow
                description "Allow DiskStation"
                external-port 1024-65535
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.10.15/32
            }
            rule 30 {
                action allow
                description "Allow Apple Airport Time Capsule"
                external-port 1024-65535
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.20.254/32
            }
            rule 40 {
                action allow
                description "Allow XBoxOne_Duke"
                external-port 1024-65535
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.10.90/32
            }
            rule 50 {
                action allow
                description "Allow XBOX360_JOEL"
                external-port 1024-65535
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 192.168.20.55/32
            }
            rule 9001 {
                action deny
                description "Deny everything else"
                external-port 0-65535
                local-port 0-65535
                subnet 0.0.0.0/0
            }
        }
        listen-on eth1.10
        listen-on eth1.20
        nat-pmp enable
        port 59166
        secure-mode enable
        wan eth0
    }

None of the consumer Gateways provided by any ISP in North America have the ability to play multiplayer games properly because their processors are not fast enough to handle upnp properly . Great GamePlay can only be accomplished with either gaming routers or like I have done with commercial grade routers that also provide proper protections from upnp hackers.

 

Anyone interested in my GamePlay stuff can check my website under Multiple Gaming Consoles like Xbox/PlayStation

David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?


@Datalink wrote:

 

Just thinking about this, with IPV6 up and running, you should be able to do this and not worry about IPV4 NAT states or Hairpinning.  If you bring up Microsoft Edge on the xbox, and go to ipv6-test.com, that should tell you if you have full IPV6 connectivity.  From what I understand thats the only way to determine if IPV6 is available on the xbox.  If it is, then running multiple xboxs should work.  The fly in the ointment from what I can see is that there isn't any means to determine what path the xbox decides to use, which would be one of IPV4, IPV6, or Teredo.  If you could force the Xbox to use IPV6, then in theory, this wouldn't be an issue.  Unfortunately the Xbox determines what path to use based on its own internal criteria. 


FYI, the Xbox One by default will utilize ipv6 and only goes dual stack or single stack ipv4 when the other consoles in the "GamePlay party" are NOT ipv6 enabled .... so if all game players who have joined in are utilizing ipv6 on their networks and "game consoles" Xbox One is VERY happy to oblige. And like you've mentioned with IPv6 no NAT issues [a huge positive for gamers] plus performance is much improved assuming the path the ISP provides is stable. However, ipv6 does introduce security issues that most gamer centric routers have not addressed yet because non of the "gamer" routers implement Access Control List mechanisms that help to mitigate network intrusions issues.

David Mozer
IT-Expert on Call
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: 4 friends with similar Xbox Multiplayer connection problems. Coincidence?

Now if only I can get it to work.