Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

Thank you for your post, and hopeful of further clarifications in layman's terms as much as possible. I'm in the same boat without Ignite TV yet, and trying to understand what is and isn't possible before deciding.

 

One added question having to do with an owned router. Anyone who cares about security and privacy probably bought one, with tons of router makes and models having been on sale everywhere for years. Most of these people are likely not techies and know the default basic router setup only.

 

So a Rogers installer arriving to hook up the complete Ignite package including TV will commonly see such a setup. What do they do? Does he/she simply tell the owner they can't get TV and possibly other Ignite features unless they throw out their router? Or, do they assist the owner with setting up their router as an access point wifi connection to the XB6? In that case wouldn't the owner's setup with ethernet connections to desktop computers and powerline still work without interfering with Ignite? 

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@rjmaxim wrote:

@-G-  By Pods...do you mean WiFi pods (ie. Mesh pods...Eero or other?). Just trying to understand the hardware variables with an XB6 modem. The way I understand it (and I don't have Ignite TV)......each TV requires an Xi6 box. For WiFi you can use the XB6 or extend coverage by adding Mesh pods (Rogers Eero or your own?....but only if you use your own router?). However,  if you use the XB6 in bridge mode and use your own router as the gateway, the Phone line will still work on the XB6 modem....but you'll need to configure your router to connect to each Xi6's for IPTV...either via Ethernet or WiFi. To extend WiFi reach, you can use either wired WAP or Mesh AP's. There are likely many options and perhaps a hardware topology would help clarify some of the possibilities. Great forum...keep up the good work.            


In a typical Rogers Ignite TV installation, the XB6 is in gateway mode.  (i.e. Bridge Mode is disabled.)  Each TV requires its own Xi6 set-top box and in a typical installation, they connect to the network via Wi-Fi.  If required, Pods are provided to expand Wi-Fi coverage in your home so that your set-top boxes get a strong connection.  The XB6 has software in it that integrates with the Pods and the Pods will only work when the XB6 is in gateway mode and has wireless enabled.  The Pods are configured and managed using an app on an Android or iOS mobile device.

 

Optionally, Rogers can also rent you eero Wi-Fi mesh hardware.  Again, the XB6 is in gateway mode, the private Wi-Fi network gets disabled, and the eero mesh is configured in bridge mode and the eero Hub is connected to the XB6.  The Xi6 set-top boxes are then connected via Wi-Fi to the eero mesh.  The eero hardware also needs to be installed using an app on an Android or iOS mobile device.

 

If your home is already pre-wired with Ethernet jacks, you can use those as well to connect your set-top boxes.  The Rogers installation tech can also provide you with a small 5-port LAN switch to provide you with additional network ports.

 

In all Rogers-supported configurations, the XB6 operates in gateway mode.  The telephone service on the XB6 remains active in both gateway mode and in bridge mode.

 

If you already have your own mesh network hardware (e.g. a Linksys Velop or something similar from another vendor) you can still continue to use it.  If you leave the XB6 in gateway mode and put your Wi-Fi mesh hardware into bridge mode, similar to how Rogers deploys their eero solution, the Rogers Tech Support teams will still be able to run their usual tests when you call in to report a problem.

 

There are some users who may have their own existing high-end network hardware, or who may have other reasons for wanting to use their own router.  To do this, you can (and should) enable Bridge Mode on the XB6 and connect your own router.  If Rogers provided you with Pods, they will lose connectivity and you won't be able to connect them to your own hardware.  You will also need to provide network connectivity for your Xi6 set-top boxes.  This configuration is officially unsupported by Rogers.

 

When using your network hardware, you should always have a fallback plan where you can put your Ignite TV hardware back into a fully-supported configuration.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@dougjp wrote:

Thank you for your post, and hopeful of further clarifications in layman's terms as much as possible. I'm in the same boat without Ignite TV yet, and trying to understand what is and isn't possible before deciding.

 

One added question having to do with an owned router. Anyone who cares about security and privacy probably bought one, with tons of router makes and models having been on sale everywhere for years. Most of these people are likely not techies and know the default basic router setup only.


Having Ignite TV is different than just being an Internet customer.  Rogers is providing you with a turnkey service that includes TV, Internet and Home Phone.  They try to make it as easy as possible for you to connect your own devices to Wi-Fi and to provide you with the ability to manage your home network using a friendly app on your mobile phone.  All of the equipment that they provide was designed to work together.  If you substitute their equipment with your own, Rogers will no longer be able to support you in any formal way.  They are not familiar with your network setup, they have not tested their equipment with yours, and they will not be able to run their usual tests to diagnose problems when they arise.

 

A "bridge mode" configuration, where you use your own router, is not terribly complicated.  Your current router configuration may even work as is, without any changes.  However, what would you do when your picture starts freezing, you start getting audio drops outs, it takes 10 seconds for the stream to start after you change channels, your Wi-Fi becomes slow, or Ignite TV stops working altogether?  With a standard, supported setup, help is just a phone call away.

 

So a Rogers installer arriving to hook up the complete Ignite package including TV will commonly see such a setup. What do they do? Does he/she simply tell the owner they can't get TV and possibly other Ignite features unless they throw out their router? Or, do they assist the owner with setting up their router as an access point wifi connection to the XB6? In that case wouldn't the owner's setup with ethernet connections to desktop computers and powerline still work without interfering with Ignite? 


The Rogers install tech should not perform an Ignite TV installation that cannot be supported by Rogers.  What they will probably will do is perform a standard Ignite TV installation, connect the set-top boxes in the usual way, and make sure that your new phone service works.  If you want to continue using your existing router, they will probably point out the LAN port on the back of the XB6 and show you where you can connect your own equipment.  The tech may be able to provide you with some additional assistance at their discretion.

 

If you decide to go with Ignite TV, one thing that I would do in advance is draw a map of your network on paper, get an inventory of every device connected to your home network, document your IP address plan and identify any devices with static IP addresses.  Will anything break if your internal IP addressing changes?  Do you have any other unique requirements or anything unique about your setup?  Do you use your existing Internet service for anything other than web browsing, online banking, online shopping, streaming video, etc?  Do you use a VPN client to access systems at work?

 

If you would like to discuss any network configuration options that you are considering or share any concerns before switching to Ignite TV, feel free to create a separate thread so that the Community can assist you as best as they can.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

On my old Hitron modem I put the unit into bridge mode and my netgear worked flawlessly to connect to the internet and use my netgear wifi.

 

On the new ignite setup, I put the ignite in bridge mode, but my netgear router deosn not have an internet connection. 

 

Have I missed something with this new setup?

 

Thanks

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

In some cases when you switch modems, you need to run a factory reset on the router in order for the router to connect to the modem.  That will usually resolve the situation.  At the very least, try a router restart to see if it picks up the change in IP address as indicated below. 

 

One point to keep in mind, the older Hitron modem used 192.168.0.1 as its base IP address in Gateway mode.  In Bridge mode that IP address is assigned to the follow on router unless the router has some unusual default LAN IP address of its own.  In bridge modem the modem then uses 192.168.100.1 as its IP address.  

 

The Ignite TV XB6 modems use 10.0.0.1 I believe in Gateway mode.  In Bridge mode that address should be assigned to the router.  Not sure what address the modem then requires.  So, you should also be looking for that shift in LAN IP addresses on the router side. 



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

@lavalamps  The same settings should work.

 

First verify that your router has obtained public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses on its WAN interface.  If it has, you might simply have to disconnect your PC from the network and reconnect just to make sure that you are obtaining a new IPv6 address from the prefix delegation that your router received.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

I have my home LAN configured and this part is working great. I'm literally one week into having the Ignite service and for the last two days, there have been many disconnects & lots of TV issues (mainly with buffering, especially with any streaming service outside normal TV channels). I am not using WiFi for any Rogers connections, I have all hardwired connections for my video capable connections in general. I've read some other threads/postings which suggest these issues occur most during "busy shared hub" times and increasing the internet service speeds do nothing to address this.

 

One surprising thing is all three of my TV boxes are only registering as 100BaseT, these are the slowest connections of anything on my network. Are these devices not Gigabit capable? And port1 on the modem was constantly going up & down, until I switched to port2.

 

So are there any network optimizations needed, when their modem is in bridge mode? I get that Rogers support can only do so much, but expecting reliable service through their modem is not being unrealistic. I'm 100% confident that my LAN can sustain over 100MB/s to any device on my network, which is more than enough for even a high-bit-rate UHD stream (which I'm guessing is less than 10MB/s per stream).

 

I was with Bell for the past 3-years and experienced maybe 2 or 3 outages, lasting maybe 5-min in total (honestly, their service worked amazing compared to what I'm seeing now with Ignite - sorry).

 

If anyone can help with details for optimizing my private network (when the Rogers modem is in bridge mode), well I'm more than willing to give this a try! Thank you

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@-20 wrote:

One surprising thing is all three of my TV boxes are only registering as 100BaseT, these are the slowest connections of anything on my network. Are these devices not Gigabit capable?


No, they are not Gigabit-capable because they do not need to be.  The bitrate for HD streams averages only 10Mb/s ...and 25 Mb/s for 4K streams, so a 100Mb/s network interface on the set-top box is more than sufficient.

 

And port1 on the modem was constantly going up & down, until I switched to port2.


I have no idea why it would be doing that.  Do you still see the same behaviour if you connect a different/simpler device, such as a LAN switch?  ... or connect a computer directly rather than your router?

 

EDIT: I think I misread your post.  Are you seeing this with a Rogers-supplied LAN switch that you are using to connect your Xi6 set-top boxes?

 

So are there any network optimizations needed, when their modem is in bridge mode?


No, you shouldn't need to do anything special.  If you implement any schemes for network prioritization or rate limiters to control buffer bloat, it will most likely have a detrimental effect because you will either decrease the number of packet buffers that are available (by splitting the total number available across multiple queues) or (un?)intentionally cause packet loss.

 

Unlike Fibe TV, which multicasts streams at a constant and relatively low bitrate, Ignite TV sends unicast streams.  The streams are buffered and traffic arrives in bursts, so it should be tolerant of minor packet loss over DOCSIS.  If your modem shows relatively few uncorrectable codeword errors in the connection stats and your home network (LAN and Wi-Fi) are well-engineered and working properly, Ignite TV should work well.

 

I only have a 150Mb/s service and don't try to do anything fancy to "optimize" my network, and my Ignite TV service has been glitch-free since the day I signed up.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@-G- wrote:

A "bridge mode" configuration, where you use your own router, is not terribly complicated.  Your current router configuration may even work as is, without any changes.  However, what would you do when your picture starts freezing, you start getting audio drops outs, it takes 10 seconds for the stream to start after you change channels, your Wi-Fi becomes slow, or Ignite TV stops working altogether?  With a standard, supported setup, help is just a phone call away.

I was dead serious when I said this.  Looks like @-20  may have experienced all of these issues.

 

@-20 wrote:

I'm also thinking Wow, I'm getting a lot of buffering issues which drops audio or goes black (nothing) for 2-to-5 seconds. Lots of pop-up messages apologizing for the technical issues and suggesting to reboot my wifi device (which I'm not using with Rogers at all). Internet reliability was great for the first 5 days of our new service. But for the last two days, it's been down about 10 times! [...] And PVR cloud recording is extremely frustrating, just cause the issues are consistently frequent. Actually watching CraveTV or NetFlix randomly stops, goes black for 5 seconds (or so) and then puts on a channel that we didn't even have selected! It's like a ghost in the box. And this is very frustrating, almost "ever 2 minutes" of streaming anything, it's consistently dropping or going crazy! Btw, I'm not using any wireless, all hardwired, and the TV boxes are only registering as 100BaseT connections (the slowest connections of anything on my switch!!!). What to do?


When things get this bad in a "Bridge Mode" situation, you'll need to go back to the original installed configuration.  If the problems persist, you can then call Rogers for assistance.

 

If you are experiencing these problems, enabling Bridge Mode on the XB6 and using your own equipment likely will not make the situation any better.  You should only consider switching to a non-standard / unsupported configuration once you are certain that your Ignite TV installation is stable and trouble-free.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@-20 wrote:

If anyone can help with details for optimizing my private network (when the Rogers modem is in bridge mode), well I'm more than willing to give this a try! Thank you


My apologies.  When I first read your post, it sounded like you had enabled Bridge Mode on the XB6 and were experiencing issues running Ignite TV using your own network equipment and were looking for ways to optimize your home network.

 

If this is not the case, and you are running into these issues in a standard, supported, as-installed configuration, then this is definitely not good.  Ignite TV should not only "just work" but it should work well.  You need to call Rogers Tech Support and have them investigate.   However, before you call Rogers, perform a reset of all of your Ignite TV equipment.  Start by power-cycling your XB6 gateway.  Wait for the status LED to turn solid white.  Next, power-cycle each set-top box.  Hopefully, this reset procedure will get everything back into a good state again.  If not, it's still the first thing that you should do before calling tech support.

 

(For anybody running Ignite TV over their own infrastructure, the reset procedure (if it should ever be required) and order is similar:  Start by resetting your XB6, followed by your router, followed by your Wi-Fi mesh (if necessary), followed by your set-top boxes.)