Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

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Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

There have been many questions in the Rogers Community Forums lately from users who have switched to Ignite TV and now wish to enable Bridge Mode on the Ignite modem/gateway and use Ignite TV with their own routers and Wi-Fi access points.  The Ignite TV service is actually pretty flexible and works great with a wide range of 3rd-party networking equipment.  That said, Rogers cannot troubleshoot problems or provide any level of support for these configurations so I'm creating this thread so that we, as a community, can support each other.

 

I recently posted some configuration tips for setting up your own router for use with the Ignite TV service and (time permitting) will post a more comprehensive step-by-step guide.  However, I still don't recommend using Ignite TV in any unsupported configuration unless you have moderately-advanced networking skills and can troubleshoot problems on your own.  Also, if any technical issues should arise, you need to be able to put your Ignite TV components back into their originally-installed supportable configuration before contacting Rogers for technical support.

 

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

For a while now, I have been meaning to create a step-by-step guide on how to get Ignite TV working with a customer-owned firewall/router with the Rogers Ignite modem/gateway in Bridge Mode.  I was hoping to have something more user-friendly, with pictures and diagrams.  However, we are getting more and more people who would prefer to use Ignite TV with their own equipment so I've created this interim guide which consolidates information that, up to now, has been scattered across several posts in several threads.  I also cannot document every possible configuration so, for now, I will post this text-only, general step-by-step guide.

 

This guide is also applicable to Rogers Ignite Internet customers as well who have the XB6 modem/gateway.

 

Disclaimer: Rogers DOES NOT provide any official support for ANYTHING that I am describing here, so I am assuming that anybody attempting these steps has moderate-to-advanced networking knowledge, has thorough knowledge of their own network gear and can self-support this configuration.

 

If you should also ever run into any technical problems with Ignite TV, you may need to revert your network back to an as-installed configuration before calling Rogers Technical Support.

 

When you enable Bridge Mode on the XB6 modem/gateway, Wi-Fi will be disabled.  I am assuming that you are performing these steps using a wired Ethernet connection from your computer to your own router and that you have a plan in place to transition your Wi-Fi network clients to your own Wi-Fi router / Wi-Fi mesh network / Wi-Fi Access Point.

 


Step 1: Perform a basic configuration of your router.

 

By default, the Rogers Ignite gateway has an internal IPv4 address of 10.0.0.1 and assigns the 10.0.0.0/24 address space for the Internal LAN segment. It would be best to avoid using this address space on your router.

 

Suggestion: Use 192.168.1.1/24 (or 192.168.1.1 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0) on your router's internal LAN segment.

 

Your router must be able to support both IPv4 and IPv6.

Configure your IPv4 WAN connection as a DHCP client.

Configure your IPv6 WAN connection as a DHCPv6 client and request a /64 IPv6 Prefix Delegation.

 

A few years ago, a member of the Rogers Network Team posted steps on how to to configure IPv6 on several different routers from many common network vendors.

 

It is up to you as to whether or not you choose to configure or enable Wi-Fi at this point on your router.  If you plan to replicate the WiFi settings on your XB6, then I would recommend configuring those settings now but leaving Wi-Fi disabled on your Router until you confirm connectivity with the XB6.

 


Step 2: Connect your router to the Rogers Ignite modem/gateway.

 

Connect your router’s WAN (Internet) port to LAN port #1 on the Rogers modem (labelled ETH 1 on the XB6) using an Ethernet patch cable.  DO NOT connect any devices other than your router to the Ignite modem/gateway.

 

Verify that you are able to obtain IPv4 and IPv6 addresses on your WAN interface and that the computer (connected to your router) has basic Internet connectivity.

 

 

Step 3: Disable Wi-Fi on the Rogers Ignite modem/gateway

 

The XB6 gateway does not have a true "bridge mode".  You cannot completely disable Wi-Fi on the XB6; Rogers still has some hidden networks active that cannot be turned off as they are required for other service that the XB6 supports.

 

Before you disable Wi-Fi on the XB6, perform a wireless survey and statically assign a channel to both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz Wi-Fi bands. 

 

As of the time that I wrote this, Rogers does not offer any "Connected Home" services that require Wi-Fi connectivity so there should not be much (if any) traffic to/from the XB6 while it is in bridge mode.  It is therefore okay to pick channels that duplicate the ones that you have statically assigned on your own equipment.  However, if you have Wi-Fi equipment that uses Auto channel selection, you will want to avoid setting the "best" available channels on the XB6 that you would rather want your own equipment to use, and you should also avoid picking channels that your closest neighbours are using as well so that you do not disrupt their Wi-Fi networks either.

 

Once you have set and saved your desired Wi-Fi channels on the XB6, disable Wi-Fi.  The XB6 will continue to use these channel assignments for its hidden Wi-Fi networks.

 


Step 4: Enable Bridge Mode on the Rogers Ignite modem/gateway

 

On your own router, release and renew the IPv4 and IPv6 addresses that you obtained through DHCP and DHCPv6.

Verify that public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses are assigned to your WAN interface.

Confirm that you still have Internet connectivity on the computer that is connected to your router.

 


Step 5: Enable Wi-Fi on your own router.

 

If you have reused the same Wi-Fi SSID and passphrase as the one on the XB6, your Wi-Fi devices should reconnect to your own router.

 


Step 6: Connect the Ignite TV set-top boxes to Wi-Fi

 

Even if you have kept the same Wi-Fi credentials, the Ignite TV set-top boxes probably will not immediately reconnect to Wi-Fi on their own.  Power-cycle each box; it should then connect to Wi-Fi using its stored credentials when it restarts.  

 

If you have changed your Wi-Fi credentials, you will need to reconnect your set-top box to Wi-Fi as follows: Press and hold the "Exit" button on your remote for three seconds, then key in: "Down" "Down" 9 4 3 4  (FYI, 9434 spells WiFi)

 

 

Step 7: Verify that Ignite TV is working properly

 

Channels should change immediately

Picture quality should be excellent, with no audio or video drop-outs.

Apps such as Netflix should load.

 

In "Settings / Device Settings / Network" the Ignite set-top box should report that "Your WiFi signal strength is excellent!".  If WiFi connectivity to the set-top box is poor, you will likely experience frequent audio/video dropouts and the Wi-Fi performance in your home, in general, will be poor as well.

 


Closing comments:

 

You can still log into the XB6 by going to http://10.0.0.1 , even when the unit is in bridge mode.  The XB6 will do the routing for this connection internally so you will not need to any add static routes to this destination or perform any other configuration steps.  (That is one of the reasons that I recommend that you do NOT use this address space on your internal LAN.)

 

I need to say this one last time: Rogers DOES NOT officially support enabling "Bridge Mode" on your XB6 gateway or using Ignite TV with your own router in this configuration.  If you should ever experience any technical problems with Ignite TV and require assistance from Rogers Tech Support, you will need to put your Ignite TV components back into their original default configuration: with Bridge Mode disabled on the XB6 and your set-top boxes connected to the XB6 directly.  The Ignite TV components need to be in this configuration so that Rogers can run their tests and poll the set-top boxes for their status.   Do this before calling Rogers through your Home Phone service.  You cannot disable Bridge Mode while you are on the phone with them because doing so will reboot your XB6 and drop your call.

 

Good luck, if you should decide to embark on this journey!



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

This is a great idea @-G-! The Rogers Community Forums is a living, breathing database of knowledge and answers. It survives on the posts from users like you and seeds the answers that make the Community Forums a pleasant place to be.

 

Thank you as always for being such a great help!

 

 

 

 

RogersZia

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

Sad. That kills switching to Ignite as I'm not qualified.

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

I'd like to keep this thread strictly for technical discussions pertaining to network configurations with the Ignite TV Gateway in Bridge Mode.  However, I will say a few things about challenges and surprises that you may run into.

 

For me, Ignite TV has been working amazingly well.  I count on Rogers to keep the Ignite TV service up and running and my Internet link working to spec and as error-free as possible.  Everything inside my house is my responsibility.  I won't be calling Rogers for help if my Wi-Fi suddenly becomes slow.  If something should break terribly, I have to be prepared to fully troubleshoot things on my side before I can call Rogers for support.  That also requires fully understanding why I have my equipment configured the way that I have it configured.  I also need to be prepared to put my Ignite TV equipment back into a supported configuration whenever required.

 

When running the XB6 with Bridge Mode enabled, you also have to be on the lookout for weird things happening because Rogers does not test Bridge Mode configurations as thoroughly as they would their supported configurations.  For example, when Rogers rolled out the Ignite Wi-Fi Hub portal, their backend provisioning software enabled Wi-Fi on my XB6, and in a very strange configuration.  When I called tech support, they didn't think that this could even be possible.  Furthermore, all of their tools confirmed that Wi-Fi on my XB6 was disabled even though my Wi-Fi analyzers said otherwise.  The tech that they dispatched couldn't believe it either.

 

Even when things are working normally, you may run into situations that will stump Tech Support.  With Bridge Mode enabled and Wi-Fi disabled, you would expect that the Wi-Fi radios in the XB6 would be turned off.  The "admin" Web UI shows that Wi-Fi is completely disabled.  However, Wi-Fi is actually still up and running and the XB6 has several hidden Wi-Fi networks enabled and active.  This was a total surprise to several Tech Support agents when I informed them of this.

 

With Wi-Fi still active and the XB6 configured to use Auto channel selection, it also tends to pick the "best" Wi-Fi channels.  This will mess up your Wi-Fi equipment if you have auto channel selection enabled, and your neighbours' as well.  Now everybody's Wi-Fi gear is in a perpetually unstable state as their routers constantly look for better/less crowded channels, especially in the 2.4 GHz range.  (So, scan your Wi-Fi environment and manually assign Wi-Fi channels on all the equipment that you control in such a way that you keep your in-home Wi-Fi as optimal and stable as possible and also minimize the impact on your neighbours' Wi-Fi as well.)

 

Ignite TV is a fantastic service but it has a lot of "moving parts" that need to work well together.  In a standard supported configuration, all of the hardware that Rogers provides is well-tested and was actually designed to work together.  If you should run into any issues with the service, all that you need to do is pick up the phone for technical assistance.  Over the last several months, Rogers has rolled out even more tools that enable you, their customers, to manage your home network environment with convenient tools and mobile apps.  This is just the beginning.

 

With a non-standard setup, you will need to be totally self-sufficient and will miss out on many conveniences.  That's why I continue to urge everyone to exercise caution and think twice before embarking on this journey.  I also hope that this discussion thread will be helpful to those who do venture off the beaten path and be informative to those who choose to remain with a fully-supported configuration as well.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

Will switching the Ignite WiFi Gateway (XB6) to bridge mode affect the device's modem functionality?

 

I have a TP-Link AC5400 which I prefer to use as the router.  I'm worried that if I switch the Ignite gateway to bridge mode, it would affect its function as a router.  Will that be the case?

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@amor_gamao wrote:

Will switching the Ignite WiFi Gateway (XB6) to bridge mode affect the device's modem functionality?

 

I have a TP-Link AC5400 which I prefer to use as the router.  I'm worried that if I switch the Ignite gateway to bridge mode, it would affect its function as a router.  Will that be the case?


By enabling Bridge Mode on the XB6, you'll be disabling most of its internal functions and any devices connected to the XB6's LAN ports will get public IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.  On the XB6, the telephone service will continue to function but wireless will be unavailable, your Pods (if you have any) will lose connectivity, and pretty much every configuration setting will be "greyed out" and unavailable except for the option to disable Bridge Mode.

 

That means that your router will have a direct connection to the Internet and its security features will be the only thing protecting your internal in-home network from the outside world.  You router will also have to provide network connectivity for your Ignite TV set-top boxes.  You'll need to ensure that IPv4 and IPv6 is working and configured properly and that there are no interoperability problems with your router and the Ignite TV service.  You will also need to ensure that your router provides sufficient wireless coverage throughout your home.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

@-G- I do not have any Pods or need them, but out of general interest, can they be used with your own router or are they limited to the XB6?
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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode


@Bplayer wrote:
@-G- I do not have any Pods or need them, but out of general interest, can they be used with your own router or are they limited to the XB6?

I don't know.  Maybe?  I think I can say with certainty that the official answer is "No" but I don't know if it is actually technically possible.  It all depends on the firmware.  I can't say for sure because I don't have any Pods either, so I can't even try to test them in a standalone configuration.

 

The Pods are made by Plume and are sold as a standalone product, much like the eero.  However, much of their marketshare comes from partners, such as Comcast and Rogers, who licence and resell their technology with their own branding and integrate it into other hardware that they provide.  Some routers, such as the Samsung SmartThings WiFi can integrate with Plume Pods directly, which you then manage through the Plume App.  However, I don't know if you can hardwire a Rogers Pod or set it up as a standalone gateway pod.  Even if the hardware allows it, you would need a Plume account to be able to configure and manage them.



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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

I had a couple plume pods installed with the Technicolor modem and they appear to be locked down substantially. For ease of installation I went through the setup with the tech using my SSID and everything else default to the standard Ignite install and all worked well. The plume pods were needed upstairs so the tech could get a Green status on the Ignite TV box before leaving.

 

After the tech left I changed the default internal subnet from the 10.0.0.x to my 192.x.x.x network to align with my static IP's and vlan configs and that broke the Plume pods from connecting. Support tells me that the internal subnet cannot be changed as the Pods will only work on the default which is ridiculous. The lack of DHCP/DNS control is also aggravating.

 

I tried connecting to the LAN port etc of the pods and there is just no way to get them to connect anymore unless I revert the subnet to default on the gateway it seems. On a positive note the Technicolor gateway is by far the best Wifi device Rogers has ever provided. It covers my whole 2 story house (~1800sq ft) from the corner of the basement and has been completely stable for over a month since install. The TV box upstairs works fine even though it is "red" when rogers support checked it.

 

I have not had time to bridge and put my own Mikrotik CCR router and Aerohive AP back into production but will be doing so soon but thought I would share.

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Re: Using the Ignite TV Modem/Gateway in Bridge Mode

@-G-  By Pods...do you mean WiFi pods (ie. Mesh pods...Eero or other?). Just trying to understand the hardware variables with an XB6 modem. The way I understand it (and I don't have Ignite TV)......each TV requires an Xi6 box. For WiFi you can use the XB6 or extend coverage by adding Mesh pods (Rogers Eero or your own?....but only if you use your own router?). However,  if you use the XB6 in bridge mode and use your own router as the gateway, the Phone line will still work on the XB6 modem....but you'll need to configure your router to connect to each Xi6's for IPTV...either via Ethernet or WiFi. To extend WiFi reach, you can use either wired WAP or Mesh AP's. There are likely many options and perhaps a hardware topology would help clarify some of the possibilities. Great forum...keep up the good work.