Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

I know IP6 is better, but is it going to solve the pixelation problem on the ethernet port on the tv box when it maxes out at 100mb?

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Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes


@Daver99 wrote:

I know IP6 is better, but is it going to solve the pixelation problem on the ethernet port on the tv box when it maxes out at 100mb?


If you're experiencing pixellation, it does not have anything to do with the Xi6 "only" having a Fast Ethernet port.  100 Mb/s is not really a limitation because the bit rates for the media streams don't come anywhere close to that.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

So one would think.....so how is it that I only have issues with hardwired and typically watching sports.  Something is not right.  I have tried different network jacks, different cables, etc all with the same effect.  That really points me back to my switch - D-LINK DGS-1016D unmanaged, not top of the line but not cheapest either.  I have my routers QoS to give priority for streaming video.

 

I don't really want to buy a new switch to test a theory when my TV is fine on WiFi.

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Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

@Daver99 whats the complete wired path, from the modem to the Xi6-A set top box?  Please include any house ethernet wiring and the switch.  

 

If you are using house ethernet wiring, have you checked it recently with a Lan Ethernet cable tester, just to see if there's any issue with the wiring or any connectors?



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Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes


@Daver99 wrote:

So one would think.....so how is it that I only have issues with hardwired and typically watching sports.  Something is not right.  I have tried different network jacks, different cables, etc all with the same effect.  That really points me back to my switch - D-LINK DGS-1016D unmanaged, not top of the line but not cheapest either.  I have my routers QoS to give priority for streaming video.

 

I don't really want to buy a new switch to test a theory when my TV is fine on WiFi.


I also have some of my Xi6's hardwired and am not running into any issues whatsoever.  I currently have my XB6 in bridge mode and am using my own router, which is running OpenWrt.  I actually don't have any QoS configured because I don't really have any bandwidth constraints at the moment, even with my 150u Internet service, and also don't want to configure any policies where my router intentionally drops packets, or has to manage internal priority queues, or have anything configured that could slow down packet processing.

 

That said, I've also run into some cases where a hardwired Xi6 can run into some weird issues.  I had been running all of my Xi6's wirelessly but decided to switch to a wired configuration while I tested an old access point after a software upgrade.  The "new" wireless network was not entirely stable.  My Xi6's also joined the wireless network.  Even though the Xi6's only used wired Ethernet for sending traffic, something about the glitchy wireless caused them to not process video segments from time to time, and this, in turn, caused the video to freeze and the sound to drop out.  The problems went away as soon as I turned off that access point.

 

I also had another case where my Ignite TV service suddenly became unstable one day.  I thought that it had something to do with my setup but after a quick health check, everything looked fine on my side.  Apparently, Rogers had made some network changes and quite a few people were reporting issues with video freezing, problems with channel changes, etc.  To get things stable again, I unplugged my Xi6's, powered off wireless, my router, and the XB6... then brought everything else back up in the reverse order.  No problems since then.

 

So I can confirm that the Xi6's can behave strangely when wired.  I can also confirm that they can, and usually do, run perfectly fine when wired as well.



I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

Hola, I haven't moved yet but when I do, Ignite TV will be in my future.  All I need to know is there an ethernet port on the rear of the TV set top boxes?  If so, would I be able to run Cat5/6 from the set top box to, let's say my PS3?  Thanks in advance.  Cheers!

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

The answer is yes, but there is still some controversy over quality when connected this way - there are quality issues with video.

Results seem mixed across this group with some having a good experience and others such as  myself having poor video quality when watching sports.  I am still in troubleshooting mode but have reverted all my connections back to WiFi.

I think you don't want to change your plans of running CAT 5/6 throughout your home, as I feel the issues will be eventually resolved.

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Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

"All I need to know is there an ethernet port on the rear of the TV set top boxes?  If so, would I be able to run Cat5/6 from the set top box to, let's say my PS3?"

 

@ginsoaker just to clarify the situation, I'm assuming that your thinking about the new Ignite TV service which uses Arris set top boxes, (Xi6-A and newer Xi6-T) which are either wifi or ethernet fed.  So, yes, there is an ethernet port on the set top boxes, but, that ethernet port is used as the one and only wired connection to the modem.  From what we've seen so far, that port can't be used as an output port to some other device.  This particular version of the Comcast set top boxes do not have a cable port as is typical of the current generation of cable boxes, so its either ethernet or wifi connected.  

 

I'm not sure of what your planning when you say "would I be able to run Cat5/6 from the set top box to, let's say my PS3?".  In this case the answer would be no as the ethernet port on the set top box is an input port. 

 

If you're building a new home, or moving into a house where the basement is still open and you can run ethernet cabling to points on the main floor from the basement, then I absolutely encourage you to do so.  In fact, I'd go further than that, and run structured cabling that contains a mixture of cables in one bundle.  I'd look for a bundle that includes 2 RG-6 for internet/satellite/cable, 1 or 2 (preferrably 2) Cat-6 cables for ethernet, 1 one Cat-3 for telephone (preferrably Cat-6) and 1 single mode and 1 multi-mode fibre cable.  In places such as an entertainment center or office, I'd recommend running two, maybe even three bundles to provide flexibility and capability at those points. 

 

If that's the situation that you're in, definitely run cabling to every room and/or low voltage conduit which you can use to pull cabling thru in the future.  I've lost track of how many posts that I've seen where a new home owner decided to forego any cable installation and a few weeks or months later, determines that wifi alone won't cut it when their neighbours build around them and the wifi channels become crowded as those neighbours install their wifi modems and routers and mesh networks.  Suddenly, that wifi link to the 4k tv no longer works as it should, so, the new home owner ends up looking for any solution that works.   In the end, that usually leads to something like a powerline situation that can work, but, it won't work as effectively as ethernet or RG-6 cabling which could have been installed very easily in the build stage 😞 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes

@Datalink Thanks for clarifying!

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Re: Rogers Ignite and wired TV Boxes


@Datalink wrote:

If you're building a new home, or moving into a house where the basement is still open and you can run ethernet cabling to points on the main floor from the basement, then I absolutely encourage you to do so.  In fact, I'd go further than that, and run structured cabling that contains a mixture of cables in one bundle.  I'd look for a bundle that includes 2 RG-6 for internet/satellite/cable, 1 or 2 (preferrably 2) Cat-6 cables for ethernet, 1 one Cat-3 for telephone (preferrably Cat-6) and 1 single mode and 1 multi-mode fibre cable.  In places such as an entertainment center or office, I'd recommend running two, maybe even three bundles to provide flexibility and capability at those points. 

 

If that's the situation that you're in, definitely run cabling to every room and/or low voltage conduit which you can use to pull cabling thru in the future.

That's great advice!

 

When my house was being built, the budget was tight but I still opted for structured cabling and ran Cat 5e cable (the best available at the time) to each jack location.  I also had the builder install a few 1-inch conduits running from the main panel area in the basement to the attic so that I would have the flexibility to pull just about anything to 2nd-floor locations in the future.