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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

@Grwebster @StatsMan I recommend keeping the SSIDs separate.  When they are the same you never know which network you're running on, which produces nothing but confusion if and when you're trying to troubleshoot a wifi problem.  We've see this in the past, ergo, the recommendation for separate SSIDs. 

 

As for roaming back and forth between the two networks, that's usually done thru band steering settings in the the router.  For those routers that have it, there will be a power level and possibly a data rate setting for each band.  Exceed one or the other, or go below one or the other, and the router will steer the device to the other network.  The hard part in this is to get those settings right, so that the device kicks over to the other network at a distance/power level/data rate where you want that to happen.  I believe that a lot of manufacturers who include this have simply black boxed the operation.  The only controls that the user has is to enable or disable the function.  



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Thanks , I just checked on my ASUS router and there is a setting under Wireless/Professional/roaming assistant which when enabled disconnects clients when the RSSI is lower than a specified level. I presume that this is what you are referring to. Just wondering whether there are any reccomended RSSI settings for this?
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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

@Datalink, a thought just occurred to me; the roaming assistant is enabled with settings of -55dbm for the 2.4G and -60dbm for the 5ghz band. I have recently experienced situations where my STBs suddenly disconnect from the wifi for up to a minute and then reconnect, all for apparently no reason. I am wondering whether this could be due to the roaming assistant disconnecting from one band and reconnecting to the other?
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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

@StatsMan  there's two settings for this, the Roaming Assistant enable/disable in the Professional Settings and the power level and data rate settings in the Network Tools .... Smart Connect Rule.  

 

I don't have any recommendations as I don't use this at all.  I keep just about everything running on the 5 Ghz network as the 2.4 Ghz band is hopelessly overcrowded in my neighbourhood.  So, I don't want any devices to be flipping between the 2.4 and 5 Ghz network.  

 

You could try posting a query in the SNB Asuswrt forum to see if anyone has any recommendations:

 

https://www.snbforums.com/forums/asuswrt-official.51/

 

As for the dropout that you had, did the devices flip to the other network at the end of the dropout period?  You could be absolutely correct in your thoughts on this, with the roaming assistant running a network swap at that point in time.  If that's what happens in all cases, I'll never use it.  It might be a matter of fine tuning the power levels so that the network swap is seamless, if that is possible.  



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@Datalink wrote:

@Grwebster @StatsMan I recommend keeping the SSIDs separate.  When they are the same you never know which network you're running on, which produces nothing but confusion if and when you're trying to troubleshoot a wifi problem.  We've see this in the past, ergo, the recommendation for separate SSIDs. 

 

As for roaming back and forth between the two networks, that's usually done thru band steering settings in the the router.  For those routers that have it, there will be a power level and possibly a data rate setting for each band.  Exceed one or the other, or go below one or the other, and the router will steer the device to the other network.  The hard part in this is to get those settings right, so that the device kicks over to the other network at a distance/power level/data rate where you want that to happen.  I believe that a lot of manufacturers who include this have simply black boxed the operation.  The only controls that the user has is to enable or disable the function.  


We have been running like this for years with no issues.  I appreciate the explanation, but honestly it has not caused any problems.  

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@Datalink wrote:

 

As for the dropout that you had, did the devices flip to the other network at the end of the dropout period?  You could be absolutely correct in your thoughts on this, with the roaming assistant running a network swap at that point in time.  If that's what happens in all cases, I'll never use it.  It might be a matter of fine tuning the power levels so that the network swap is seamless, if that is possible.  


I wouldn't know whether the devices flipped to the other network since the devices in question are the Xi6-A STBs and there is no way of telling which network they band they are connected to.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@RHstats wrote:

@Datalink wrote:

 

As for the dropout that you had, did the devices flip to the other network at the end of the dropout period?  You could be absolutely correct in your thoughts on this, with the roaming assistant running a network swap at that point in time.  If that's what happens in all cases, I'll never use it.  It might be a matter of fine tuning the power levels so that the network swap is seamless, if that is possible.  


I wouldn't know whether the devices flipped to the other network since the devices in question are the Xi6-A STBs and there is no way of telling which network they band they are connected to.


By going into the Xi6 menu you can tell which wireless SSID it is connected to. It will either say "wired connection" or the SSID it is connected to.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Unfortunately WiFi networks are quite a bit more complicated than most people think. The choice as to which network to connect to (and via which AP/channel etc.) is up to the client (phone, tablet etc) not the router.

This means that you can’t make a device connect to the strongest signal, it will connect to whatever its internal algorithms decide is the best option. In many cases this means that it will hang on to a weak signal, even if there is a better signal available. Many people also make the mistake of setting their router transmit power to maximum, in the belief this gives them better range or speed, but in fact it does the opposite if you have more than one router/AP/mesh network. This is because your speed/range is only as good as your devices transmitter, not your routers. If you set two routers to max power, the device (phone say) can’t tell which is the nearer, and will just connect to one of them. If this is the furthest away, the phone signal will be weak at the router/AP, resulting in a slow connection. The real solution is to set your routers power to low, so that your device will tend to roam to the strongest signal/band, which should be the closest and give you a faster connection. This also allows fewer connections per AP/router, which also gives you a faster connection, as most routers only have one radio per band, which is shared equally among all devices connected to that AP (and distant, slow devices will slow everything connected to that AP/router).

This can be improved with multiple antennas (Mu-Mimo).

Many people leave the channel selection on “auto” thinking this means “automatically pick the best channel”, when it just means “pick a random channel on every reboot”. You need to pick your Channel’s carefully for minimum interference, especially if you have more than one router. 2G only has 3 channels (1,6,11) - this is because the other channels overlap with these channels (ie channels 2,3,4 and 5 overlap with Chanel 1 or 6, so there is no point in using them).

The band steering/minimum RSSI settings on routers are just a crude way to “persuade” your phone to connect to a faster band/AP by disconnecting it - which can result in a lot of random disconnects if you are not careful.

A mesh network uses half of its bandwidth to connect to the main router, so you will only ever get 1/2 of your potential maximum speed on a mesh network - but no wires to the AP’s.

I have a Unifi network, with 8 AP’s, I get 500Mbps on my iPads/phones (which is the max for an iPhone/iPad), and 940Mbps on my laptop WiFi (gigabit plan). This is because I have 4x4 Mu-Mimo AP’s with one running 160MHz bandwidth on 5G ch36 (the one my laptop connects to), Ch 36 has very restricted power, but the most available bandwidth. Yes, 5G channels have different allowed power and bandwidth capabilities. Many routers do not even allow all 5G channels (DFS) because of Industry Canada requirements for radar detection and avoidance on DFS channels, so they just avoid the requirement by not allowing those channels.

If you only have one router, it’s easy, set it to max and take what you get, but as soon as you get into more than one router or a mesh network, you have to plan carefully to get the best performance. If you are buying a router, get one that allows DFS channels.

I’m giving this quick insight into WiFi here as there is a lot of talk about WiFi speed here, and it’s a complex subject, that Rogers certainly has no control over.

If you want the fastest speed, all, the time, every time, wired is the way to go. My Xi6 boxes are wired.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@Biollw wrote:

@RHstats wrote:

@Datalink wrote:

 

As for the dropout that you had, did the devices flip to the other network at the end of the dropout period?  You could be absolutely correct in your thoughts on this, with the roaming assistant running a network swap at that point in time.  If that's what happens in all cases, I'll never use it.  It might be a matter of fine tuning the power levels so that the network swap is seamless, if that is possible.  


I wouldn't know whether the devices flipped to the other network since the devices in question are the Xi6-A STBs and there is no way of telling which network they band they are connected to.


By going into the Xi6 menu you can tell which wireless SSID it is connected to. It will either say "wired connection" or the SSID it is connected to.


@Biollw - sorry for the delay in responding ... you are absolutely right about that. Unfortunately, it's very difficult to tell how quickly the stb flips to the other network/band as it takes some time to get into the stb menu to check, especially after a 10 or 15 second blackout and even more so if both the 2.4 Ghz and 5G bands have the same SSID.

 

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Hey There,

 

I've looked over several letters and can't seem to see if anyone's found this issue - my wireless internet signal randomly drops and then comes back several times a morning or evening. This is a big issue as I work from home and have been wired until we installed Ignite.  The base box is too far away to wire. Do the ethernet cables cary the internet from the TV box? That I could wire.  

 

If not, I'm going to have to find another (expensive) solution.