Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Bplayer
I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 205

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@scoakeley

Nothing to add to the two excellent posts above. It is not clear if this is a self install or if technician is doing it.

You said that you currently have 4 TV's. This may be a red herring but I thought I had seen postinging that there were no new Ignite installs of more than 3 TV boxes as this should be done by a technician, and technician installs were on hold due to COVID-19. You should double check that you will be getting 4 Ignite TV boxes.

sadchel
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 37

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Not on Ignite yet. I did notice the Ignite modem only has 2 Ethernet ports. 

Can you add ports to the modem in order to hardwire more devices so wifi strength is not diminished?

 

 What kind of device should I be looking at?

 

thanks

 

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,368

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@sadchel yes, you can add additional ports in order to connect more devices.  To keep it simple, buy and connect an unmanaged gigabit switch to one of the modem's ports.  Here's a reference from earlier this year:

 

https://www.techradar.com/best/best-network-switches

 

As you can see, a gigabit switch ranges from 5 or 8 port switches to larger 24 port and beyond.

 

Here's some examples of unmanaged gigabit switches:

 

https://www.canadacomputers.com/search/results_details.php?language=en&keywords=Unmanaged%20Gigabit%...

 

Note that there are 10/100 Mb/s switches and 10/100/1000 Mb/s switches.  Make sure that you purchase a 10/100/1000 Mb/s switch. 

 

Also note that new switches running 2.5/5/10 Gb/s are starting to hit the market.  That incorporates 802.3 bz, which changes the waveform and data encoding to run 2.5, 5 or 10 Gb/s over existing Cat 5, 5e or 6 ethernet cable.  These are known as multi-gig switches.  They are definitely more expensive than the switches shown above, but, their price is coming down little by little as more devices are built with ethernet ports that support 802.3 bz.  Here's one example of a multi-gig switch:

 

https://www.amazon.ca/Gigabit-UnManaged-Multi-Gig-Switch-XGS1010-12-ZZ0101F/dp/B084MLC83G

 

The bottleneck at the present time are the ports on the modems which typically only run 1 Gb/s, but, there are newer modems being produced with 2.5 Gb/s ports.  Don't know if Rogers has any intention to introduce modems with 2.5 Gb/s ports.   From what I remember, the XB7 modem has a 2.5 Gb/s port.  Any ISP that uses that modem would have the ability to offer internet plans that run above 1 Gb/s and offer the customer a data path via ethernet that allows the customer to use that higher data rate via ethernet.  



sadchel
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 37

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

is cat6 the right ethernet cable I  should get to hardwire my devices?

 

  

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,368

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Cat 5e is fine for short runs, and, at the end of the day, its really personal choice.  I don't use anything less than Cat 6, so I have a mix of Cat 6, 6a and 8 cables in use.  Our house was built with Structured wiring which has Cat 5e embedded within the wire bundle, so, stuck with that, but, as I indicated earlier, 2.5/5/10 Gb/s switches will take care of any data rate shortcomings in the future. 

 

If you happen to have Cat 6 cables on hand, I'd use those.  I wouldn't necessarily go out and buy Cat 6 cables unless you happen need more ethernet cables. 

 

Fwiw, the cabling is rated for 100 metre distances.  Here's a couple of references:

 

https://www.google.com/search?channel=fs&client=ubuntu&q=ethernet+cable+ratings

 

From that search comes the following site which is worth a quick read thru:

 

https://www.directron.com/blog/cableguide

 



TomThumb
I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 5

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Hi all. So I am about to switch to Ignite TV (3boxes) with Gigabit internet from my legacy digital package which I currently have set up in bridge mode with my ASUS RT-AC66U B. I'd really like to keep everything in bridge mode with my SSID's remaining the same. I have numerous Google displays, wifi lights, cameras, outlets, smart TV's and a wifi thermostat. I also make use of my guest network. I've read quite a few pages in this thread and think it shouldn't be too much of a problem. Is bridge mode the best option, or maybe the AP route? I'm a little sketchy about the whole thing. Thank you.

mbeim
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I went the AP route and have had no issues. The ignite boxes come off the Ignite modem (2 wifi and 1 wired) with my Asus acting as an AP for everything else in the house. Aside from a couple of signal drops in the first week, i have had no issues with anything. Good luck!
TomThumb
I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 5

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

So wifi is still broadcasting from the ignite modem?
mbeim
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Yes. I chose this route in case of issues requiring Rogers support at the outset. The Ignite modem SSID is for my tv boxes while my Asus ( with a couple of switches) stayed the main driver for all my other devices as an AP. Works great for me.
mbeim
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Also, i believe that even when bridged, the ignite modem still operates a couple of hidden wifi networks for communications with the tv boxes. I believe they even operate when the tv boxes are connected by wire. At least i remember reading that previously.