Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

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I'm Here A Lot
Posts: 5

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Thank you for the detailed explanation. Much appreciated. I will try this tomorrow. 

For SSID, I did not change anything. For passphrase, are you referring to passwords for the router? If so, the network names and passwords are different for the Rogers router and the Velop router. 

I have a bunch of devices (dimmers, swithces, etc) on 2.4Ghz on the Ignite modem that I hope move over otherwise I will have to manually connect them. Should not be an issue, just time consuming. 

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Posts: 1,676

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@vernonco  Rather than reconnect all of your devices to a new WiFi network, just rename the WiFi network on the Rogers Ignite gateway, then program the WiFi network name and password (that all of your devices are currently using) into the Velop.



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Posts: 397

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Greetings folks,

I recently discovered a big problem with my Asus RT-AC68U router when IPv6 is enabled. There’s a lengthy thread about it in the “Internet” forum under the firmware feedback topic. Anyway, long story short, I’m on the hunt for a new router or potentially just an access point. Wondering if Netgear is better than Asus and if anyone who has used equipment from both manufacturers can provide feedback. I’m debating between a Nighthawk R7000 router or a Nighthawk EX7000 range extender/access point. If I go with Ignite TV, I will either bridge the XB6 and use the Nighthawk router OR keep the XB6 in gateway mode with WiFi disabled and connect it via an Ethernet cable to the EX7000 in access point mode. I’m leaning towards the latter just so I can keep the Ignite service in a more Rogers-supported mode. I don’t need any crazy routing capabilities...I’ve never used port forwarding, QOS, etc. I’m literally only using my Asus router for better coverage compared to my CODA which is currently in bridge mode.

With the XB6 (in gateway mode, WiFi turned off) and EX7000, I would keep the XB6 in the basement and EX7000 in my family room which is dead centre of my house.

I realize I can do the same thing with my Asus (i.e. put it in AP mode) but this whole IPv6 issue has me disliking Asus at the moment. Plus I’ve heard good things about Netgear. My house is only 1700sqft so I don’t need a mesh system.

Does anyone have any thoughts with this proposed setup? Would I still be able to log into the EX7000 and control WiFi settings such as bands, channels, etc?

Thanks and apologies for the many questions across multiple threads in this forum. Just trying to get the best performance possible out of my services, and if I switch to Ignite (knowing it won’t be perfect), I’ll be saving some money too compared to my current digital services.
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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@toolcubed wrote:
With the XB6 (in gateway mode, WiFi turned off) and EX7000, I would keep the XB6 in the basement and EX7000 in my family room which is dead centre of my house.

I realize I can do the same thing with my Asus (i.e. put it in AP mode) but this whole IPv6 issue has me disliking Asus at the moment. Plus I’ve heard good things about Netgear. My house is only 1700sqft so I don’t need a mesh system.

Does anyone have any thoughts with this proposed setup? Would I still be able to log into the EX7000 and control WiFi settings such as bands, channels, etc?

If you want REALLY good WiFi, your best option is to purchase a business-grade access point.  A single TP-Link EAP245 will provide very good coverage and is surprisingly inexpensive.  If you do not have any WiFi coverage issues due to your home's construction, a single AP will suffice and that AP can be managed through an internal web UI, and will give you more control over WiFi than any consumer router or mesh system.  If you do have coverage issues, you can add additional access points, although that would be a more complicated setup.

 

If you should decide to go this route, then install the Ignite XB6 gateway in your basement and place the WiFi AP upstairs.  For bonus points, install a UPS to provide backup power.  The EAP245 gets power over Ethernet, so you can also plug the power injector into the UPS as well.  Leave the XB6 in gateway mode, disable WiFi, and whatever you do, DO NOT use the Ignite WiFi mobile app or use the Ignite WiFi hub web portal.



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Posts: 397

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Thanks @-G-

 

I might've asked this before, but is there any hard/documented confirmation that Ignite TV absolutely requires IPv6?  I'm reading mixed opinions - some say yes while others say they haven't had any issues with their Ignite TV boxes connected to just IPv4.  The reason I'm asking is because if I decide to bridge the XB6 and use my own router (in router/gateway mode), I would want to keep IPv6 disabled (regardless of router brand...from what I've recently experienced on my Asus, I just don't trust IPv6 thru a 3rd party router on the Rogers network).

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 16

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Although I can’t answer tour specific question, have you tried the XB6 on its own? I have several friends who used to bridge and recently got the XB6 and there was no need to do so, they were getting whole home coverage out of box (unless you want to run a special setup or guest network).
I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 397

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I haven’t tried the XB6 in my home because I don’t have Ignite TV...yet. I did install it for a few family members and friends and did notice its WiFi coverage to be quite good in smaller homes (e.g. 1000sqft town homes) but not so good in larger homes (e.g. 3000sqft). My house is approx 1700sqft and pretty much open concept. With my Asus router (located on my main floor on my tv stand - dead centre of the house), I get full WiFi coverage everywhere including all over my backyard, all over my front porch, and even a portion of my driveway...and that’s exclusively on the 5GHz band. I’m not confident that the XB6 would give me the same coverage on its own but I don’t know for sure because I haven’t tried it. I don’t need guest access or any special configurations - port forwarding, QOS, etc are useless to me.

@-G- Don’t I need to use the WiFi Hub app for initial setup of Ignite? Or can I go directly into the web UI as soon as I get the hardware from the technician and configure it all manually like I currently do with my own router? If I were to use the XB6 in gateway mode and then just add a WiFi extender or two (not an access point but an actual extender such as the TP-Link RE450), would using the WiFi Hub app cause problems with the extenders?
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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@jj59 wrote:
Although I can’t answer tour specific question, have you tried the XB6 on its own? I have several friends who used to bridge and recently got the XB6 and there was no need to do so, they were getting whole home coverage out of box (unless you want to run a special setup or guest network).

I would also recommend that people first try using the XB6 on its own as well.  It's fully supported by Rogers and works seamlessly with Ignite TV.

 

If you should run into problems with the standard Rogers-supported configuration, you may have no choice but to use 3rd-party components... but you will then also have to be prepared to deal with any support issues that crop up on your own as well.

 

@toolcubed wrote:

Thanks @-G-

 

I might've asked this before, but is there any hard/documented confirmation that Ignite TV absolutely requires IPv6?  I'm reading mixed opinions - some say yes while others say they haven't had any issues with their Ignite TV boxes connected to just IPv4.  The reason I'm asking is because if I decide to bridge the XB6 and use my own router (in router/gateway mode), I would want to keep IPv6 disabled (regardless of router brand...from what I've recently experienced on my Asus, I just don't trust IPv6 thru a 3rd party router on the Rogers network).


Unfortunately, nothing about Ignite TV's inner workings or technical requirements are formally documented anywhere, at least not publicly.

 

I know that Ignite TV uses IPv6 by default.  If IPv6 connectivity is partially broken, the Ignite TV set-top boxes will fall back to IPv4 but you will experience some issues with the service.  Apparently, the set-top boxes work fine in an IPv4-only setup as well... but I have not tested this configuration.

 

The only Ignite TV configuration that Rogers supports is one where you use the network equipment that they provide, with the XB6 in gateway mode and with their WiFi gear.

 

 

To those who are not happy with the Ignite Pods: FYI, last week, Comcast released new (upgraded tri-band) Pods that will improve performance significantly over the old design.  Looks like the new xFi Pods use the same hardware as a Plume SuperPod.  Hopefully Rogers will adopt these at some point as well, and the sooner the better.



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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@toolcubed wrote:
I haven’t tried the XB6 in my home because I don’t have Ignite TV...yet. I did install it for a few family members and friends and did notice its WiFi coverage to be quite good in smaller homes (e.g. 1000sqft town homes) but not so good in larger homes (e.g. 3000sqft). My house is approx 1700sqft and pretty much open concept. With my Asus router (located on my main floor on my tv stand - dead centre of the house), I get full WiFi coverage everywhere including all over my backyard, all over my front porch, and even a portion of my driveway...and that’s exclusively on the 5GHz band. I’m not confident that the XB6 would give me the same coverage on its own but I don’t know for sure because I haven’t tried it. I don’t need guest access or any special configurations - port forwarding, QOS, etc are useless to me.

If you can get good-enough coverage with your Asus router from that location then the XB6 should also be able to provide ample coverage from there as well.

 

(If set up properly, the XB6's WiFi performance should be similar to that of a 3rd-party WiFi router.  Keep in mind that government standards impose limitations on transmit power levels.  Some 5 GHz channels can operate at higher power levels than others.  However, even if your AP is using a channel with a higher transmit power, it's only useful for boosting range if the radio on the WiFi client can match that, otherwise you will just end up degrading WiFi performance if you have too many devices on your network that can barely maintain a stable link.)

 

@-G- Don’t I need to use the WiFi Hub app for initial setup of Ignite? Or can I go directly into the web UI as soon as I get the hardware from the technician and configure it all manually like I currently do with my own router?

You will need the mobile app if you will be installing Ignite Pods.  Otherwise, connect a computer via Ethernet (or via WiFi using the default credentials printed on the XB6's bottom label) and point your web browser to http://10.0.0.1

 

If I were to use the XB6 in gateway mode and then just add a WiFi extender or two (not an access point but an actual extender such as the TP-Link RE450), would using the WiFi Hub app cause problems with the extenders?

I'm not a fan of WiFi extenders at all and I refuse to use them.  In my opinion, you will be much better off using Ignite Pods.



I'm a Reliable Contributor
Posts: 397

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Thanks again for the quick and detailed response. As for extenders, I asked because I have a friend who is using the TP-Link RE450 extender on the main floor of his 3100sqft bungaloft (with Ignite gateway in his basement) and his WiFi performance on the main floor and upper loft area is stellar. Apparently Rogers supplied him with that extender when he had Ignite installed a couple of years ago when it first launched. It won several awards and seems to be a fan favourite.

https://www.pcmag.com/reviews/tp-link-ac1750-wi-fi-range-extender-re450