Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

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Resident Expert
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Posts: 13,948

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

As was discussed in the other threads (which I think you were part of?)
Yes, it can be connected to your own access point.

The only caveat is.. if there are issues with the TV box, etc.. and you call for any trouble shooting.. they dont really support the devices in that way.
You might have to un bridge the modem, connect direct to the modem to troubleshoot that way.



I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I bridged their modem seconds after install, but I'm noticing that the modem is still broadcasting Hidden SSID's

 

Have you seen this and been able to disable?

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@nuklz96 

Bridging does not disable wireless. In gateway mode you have to disable each wireless band after which you can bridge and wireless will be disabled.

David Mozer
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Posts: 162

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@nuklz96 wrote:

I bridged their modem seconds after install, but I'm noticing that the modem is still broadcasting Hidden SSID's.  Have you seen this and been able to disable?


Yes, I've seen this and have reported the problem to tech support.  Apparently, there is no way to disable these hidden SSIDs or to completely turn off the Wi-Fi radios on the XB6.  I've also escalated this issue through other channels.

 

The explanation that I was given was that one of these SSIDs, presumably the "WPA2 Personal" one, is a default SSID that a new Xi6 set-top box can use to connect to the XB6 without any configuration required.  I don't know about the "WPA/WPA2 Enterprise" SSID.

 

For now, the only thing that you can really do (apart from surrounding the XB6 with a Faraday cage) is to re-enable Wi-Fi on the XB6, assign channels to both the 2.5 and 5 GHz bands that will cause the least amount of interference with the local Wi-Fi environment, save the config, then disable Wi-Fi again.  (You can then put the XB6 back into bridge mode.)  These channel assignments will still be used for the hidden SSID's when Wi-Fi is disabled.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 10

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I’ve placed the Rogers modem on bridge mode and it seems to disable all wireless. I have to use my own router for the ignite boxes to work.
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 18

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

When we first got Ignite TV it was possible to disable the WiFi for both bands. However, after Rogers introduced the WIFi pods ( and I had three installed in my home) I found that the enable/disable buttons were grayed out in the gateway and it was no longer possible to disable WiFi. However, I just went into the XB6 gateway and the enable/disable buttons are now active again and it is possible to disable WiFi on the XB6.

 

I suspect, as -G- said above that the reason they were initially disabled was to allow the STBs to connect to the XB6 and more significantly to allow the WiFi pods and the Rogers WiFi Hub app to connect  as the Hub App is used to connect the WiFi pods to connect to the XB6.

 

I had been having a lot of problems with all the issues that everyone else has experienced with connectivity on the STBs, but I recently had a tech come in and check everything out. My system was set up with the XB6 in gateway mode with Wifi disabled and I was using my own Asus routers in AiMesh mode to distribute WiFi. The tech changed everything and put the XB6 into bridge mode (which I was surprised about because we had always been told that Rogers didn't support the XB6 in bridge mode) and he then installed three Wifi pods throughout the house to boost the Wifi signals. All my STBs are now connected by the WiFi signal form the XB6  and I have not had any issues with the STBs since. In the meantime, I am still using my Asus routers to distribute WiFi for all my other peripherals (printer, phones, iPads, AV receivers, Google Home mini, etc.) with no further issues there either. Works well for me.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@chomyn wrote:
I’ve placed the Rogers modem on bridge mode and it seems to disable all wireless. I have to use my own router for the ignite boxes to work.

You'll only see these hidden SSIDs with a Wi-Fi scanner that displays whatever information it can about nearby hidden networks.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Don't know if this belongs here but I had Rogers Ignite Internet installed a couple weeks ago but installer could not connect to my Netgear Nighthawk Router. Eventually had to bypass the Nighthawk and connect directly to my Dell XPS 8500 PC and the Internet worked. Attached to my Nighthawk, could not even do 192.168.1.1 And the installer said they are not trained in Neatgear Routers and said nothing about the BRIDGE mode I have read about on the Community Support Forum. Called Netgear to find out which Router works with Rogers Ignite Internet or what do

they recommend. Person on phone only tried to get me to pay for support. I may eventually go to the Geek Squad

which is what the installer told me to do. Find a Geeker experienced with Netgear configurations. Sad state.

Can't believe I am the first person in Canada with a Netgear Nighthawk Router connected to Rogers Ignite Internet

that has this problem!

 

FATHER'S FAVORITE SAYING
May you have long life, good health, happiness and may my God be always with you and yours.
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Posts: 6,147

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@peterfranklee the IP address that you use to log into the modem will depend on which modem model you have.  The IP address that the router assumes when the modem in operating in Bridge mode will depend on whether or not the user has selected the Automatic IP address mode for the router.  Anyone who doesn't enable that setting will normally end up with the default router IP address for the router and won't have any idea of what addresses are actually used by the modem.  If the Automatic IP address mode is selected the router will use its assigned IP address from the modem:

 

1.  If you have the new Ignite TV service XB6 modem, it uses 10.0.0.1 as an IP address.  This link shows the procedure to Bridge the XB6 modem.  That should work for wifi or ethernet:

 

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/how-to-bridge-your-rogers-ignite-modem

 

Since I don't use this modem, I'm assuming that it assigns a 10.0.0.2 address to the router when the modem switches into Bridge mode, but, don't quote me on that one.  There are other Resident Experts who can comment on the specifics for the XB6 Bridge mode. 

 

 

 

2.  If you have the white Hitron CODA-4582 modem, use the procedure linked below to kick the modem into Bridge mode.  When the modem is in Bridge mode, the router will be assigned a 192.168.0.1 address normally.  To log into the modem, thru the router when the modem is in Bridge mode, you can only use 192.168.100.1 for the modem when its in Bridge mode.  That address will usually work thru any router to access the modem.  Some users have to create an access rule in order for that address to work, but, that's not a normal requirement.  It should work without any issues.  By using 192.168.100.1 thru the router, you can log into the modem and reenable the Residential Gateway Function.  When the setting change is saved, the modem will reboot back into Gateway mode with its previous settings intact. 

 

https://www.rogers.com/customer/support/article/bridgemode-coda4582

 

In either case, this should be a fairly simple procedure.  Log into the modem, switch the required setting to enable Bridge modem and save the setting or configuration.  The modem should reboot into Bridge mode.  When you connect your router to the modem, it should, normally, use its assigned IP address as specified by the modem.  What you see for your LAN address will depend entirely on the IP address settings that you have selected in the routers WAN / LAN settings page.  If you already have the router connected to the modem when you switch the modem into Bridge mode, you should reboot / restart the router when the modem reboots into Bridge mode.  

 

If you were assuming that 192.168.1.1 was used by the modem, you're assumption is incorrect.  Modem manufacturers and ISPs all seem to follow their own choice, so, one can't assume that the address as specified by one modem will work for another modem, even within the same ISP. 

 

Edit:  Note:  if you take a modem that is configured for Gateway mode of operation, and a router that is configured to run in its normal router mode, and connect the router to the modem, that combination should work without any issues despite the mismatch of configurations.  In this case you end up with a double NAT situation, which although not desirable, should work in most situations.  Port forwarding would be a pain in this case.   Ideally as you're trying to do, you want the modem in Bridge mode and the router in its normal router mode.  



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Posts: 162

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@peterfranklee wrote:

Don't know if this belongs here but I had Rogers Ignite Internet installed a couple weeks ago but installer could not connect to my Netgear Nighthawk Router. Eventually had to bypass the Nighthawk and connect directly to my Dell XPS 8500 PC and the Internet worked. Attached to my Nighthawk, could not even do 192.168.1.1


Are you an Ignite TV customer (with an XB6 modem) or just a normal Rogers Internet customer?

 

If you have Rogers Internet only, it's not too difficult to put your modem into "bridge mode" and use your own router.

 

If you are an Ignite TV customer, it's also possible to put the XB6 modem into "bridge mode" but it's a much more daunting task.  It's (officially) TOTALLY unsupported by Rogers and I don't recommend that anybody do this unless they have fairly good networking skills, understand how all the components interoperate, can troubleshoot networking and WiFi issues in their sleep, and be able to fall back to a supportable configuration in the event that they need to contact Rogers Tech Support for assistance.