Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 9

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I use the dual network setting. Modem still available to TV and Internet. I plugged my Asus router by cable to port 2 of the modem and the wan port of my router. Factory reset my Asus and then set up my router for providing DNS for laptops in my home. The laptops have older wireless N network cards and connect at twice the speed to my Router as they do to the modem.  My desktops [two floors away] have AC network cards with dual antennae and connect equally well on either network [modem or router] so I leave them connected to the modem.

This might help others decide what to do.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

I am going to setup my new Ignite Gateway and Tv boxes later tonight.  I was wondering about the following config:

 

1 - Keep Ignite modem/router in Gateway mode and use to connect to tv boxes via wifi (default configuration from Rogers)

2 - plug my TP-Link router (re-configured as Access Point) into Rogers Gateway in order to use it as my wifi router for all my other devices and also be able to use my router's guest network and other features.

 

Is there any issue with running multiple wifi networks in my house although the Gateway would be dedicated to my tv boxes?

 

Thanks in advance for the help.

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Posts: 1,676

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@mbeim wrote:

I am going to setup my new Ignite Gateway and Tv boxes later tonight.  I was wondering about the following config:

 

1 - Keep Ignite modem/router in Gateway mode and use to connect to tv boxes via wifi (default configuration from Rogers)

2 - plug my TP-Link router (re-configured as Access Point) into Rogers Gateway in order to use it as my wifi router for all my other devices and also be able to use my router's guest network and other features.

 

Is there any issue with running multiple wifi networks in my house although the Gateway would be dedicated to my tv boxes?

 

Thanks in advance for the help.


Welcome to the Community!  Yes, that configuration should work well.  I have tested a similar configuration and never ran into any issues.

 

Do you have a newer TP-Link router that actually has an "AP mode" that you can configure in settings?  That should "just work".

 

I have also successfully configured an older router as an AP, that didn't have an "AP mode" setting.  However, that took a lot more effort and you need to make sure that you have turned off as many of the router and firewall functions/services/proxies as possible.  It's a bit of a pain but it also works fine once you configure it correctly.

 

Edit: One thing that I would avoid doing is configuring the same WiFi network name into both the router and the Ignite gateway.  Do you need your router to expand WiFi coverage in your home or are you just using it for guest access?



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Thanks for the quick reply.

Mainly for guest network  that seem to work well for us as far as coverage is concerned.  It may not do anything but I feel that this way I can keep my networks separate in case I start to have any issues.  It is a newer Archer A10 and does have a dedicated AP mode.  Am I right to assume that I simply plug one end of the cable into the ETH 1  port on the modem and the other into a LAN port on my TP router not the WAN/Internet port, right?

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Posts: 1,676

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@mbeim wrote:

Thanks for the quick reply.

Mainly for guest network  that seem to work well for us as far as coverage is concerned.  It may not do anything but I feel that this way I can keep my networks separate in case I start to have any issues.


One thing to keep in mind is that since the Ignite gateway and your router cannot form a mesh, your devices won't be able to seamlessly roam and hand-off from one WiFi network to another.

 

It is a newer Archer A10 and does have a dedicated AP mode.  Am I right to assume that I simply plug one end of the cable into the ETH 1  port on the modem and the other into a LAN port on my TP router not the WAN/Internet port, right?


The A10 User Guide doesn't specifically say but I would assume that in "AP mode" that all of your router's interfaces would be bridged together into a single, common network so it should not matter which Ethernet port you use to connect to the Ignite gateway.  However, it might be best to use the WAN port.  This would guard against potential problems should "AP mode" ever get disabled accidentally on the A10.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Thanks.  I am not worried about handing off between the networks as I would like to keep them segregated (somewhat).  Again this may not have any tech benefit but it might make it a little easier to troubleshoot any problems.  I am curious to see how well the Ignite Gateway works from a wireless performance compared to my Archer.  My modem/router is located in the absolute middle of the main floor of my 2 storey plus basement house and I currently have decent speeds and signal strength both upstairs and downstairs.  Oddly enough, my family room on the main floor (but opposite end of house as my router) has the lowest speeds but still decent enough for 4K.  I currently have that tv hardwired to my router although I am not convinced that the performance is any better.  Might try using that cable to hardwire the Ignite box and see how that works, although I have seen several posts that seem to imply that Ignite TV works better when connected to wifi.

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

@mbeim  In my experience, the Ignite TV set-top boxes usually work fine with either Ethernet or WiFi.  Strangely, when connected by Ethernet, the Ignite STB will still maintain the WiFi link even though it will not use it.  There are also strange cases (too long to explain here) where your can run into glitches in a wired configuration but this should not normally happen.  That said, use whatever connection method works best for you.

 

Oddly enough, my family room on the main floor (but opposite end of house as my router) has the lowest speeds but still decent enough for 4K.  I currently have that tv hardwired to my router although I am not convinced that the performance is any better.

A 4K stream will only consume roughly 25 Mb/s, so it may seem to work fine.  However, if a WiFi connection in that location is marginal and the encoding scheme on its WiFi link uses a low bit rate, it will consume more "air time" to transmit that data than another device with a good connection.  Only one device can transmit on a WiFi channel at a time, so any other devices, even those in range using a different WiFi network, will need to wait for the channel to become clear before they can transmit.  If you have a marginally-connected WiFi device that transmits/receives a lot of data, it will degrade the WiFi performance of another device that is only a few feet away from your router.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 2

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Hi and help!

I have the Ignite package scheduled for delivery next weekend and I want to be sure it will work for me.

I currently have Rogers home phone modem located in my basement mechanical room where it plugs into my home twisted pair phone lines.  I have three different phones plugged into wall jacks.

 

Then I have cable feeds to four different tvs.

 

Finally I have my wifi modem/router located on the top floor of my townhouse.  I'm using all four ethernet ports on the back of it; one for a NAS, one for an IP phone and, one for a google mesh wifi router and one for a Phillips lighting base control.

 

In addition, I have another router set up as a bridge near my main tv to connect to three ethernet enabled (but not wifi enabled) bits of equipment.

 

If I understand correctly I need to locate my Ignite modem close to power, cable and telephone jacks--all ok.  The kitchen springs to mind.  I can then plug two things into the ethernet ports--is that correct? but then everything else that needs to be "hard-wired" will need to go through modems that are conifigured as bridges--correct???

 

From what I can see on the Rogers site (the help really isn't very helpful) the TV Ignite boxes have an ethernet port.  Is this port usable?

 

Thanks for any help.

 

Simon

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Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities

Ok, first, the telephone system:

 

The XB6 has two telephone ports available, however, I don’t know if Tel Port 2 is active.

 

Does your Home Phone modem connect to a surface mount wall jack as shown in this picture:

 

https://www.summitsource.com/Steren-300-147WH-Modular-Surface-Mount-Jack-6-Conductor-RJ12-White-Phon...

 

Thats what my Home Phone modem does.  The tech installed a surface mount jack near the Home Phone modem a very long time ago.  The Home Phone modem plugs into that jack.  From there, the house telephone system is wired, from the internal jack connections to the house 66 block which contains the connections to the phone wall jacks around the house.

 

When the XB6 modem arrives, you will remove that Home Phone modem and disconnect the cable from that surface mount jack, which leaves the house telephone system available for use. Ideally you would plug the new modem into that same surface mount jack, as all of the house telephone cables fan out from that point.  However, you can simply plug the XB6 modem telephone port 1 to any wall telephone jack, which should enable the phone system jacks around the home.  If you need a phone connected to the XB6 modem, at the location where the XB6 will be sitting, you can use a two port connector installed on the modem’s tel 1 port.  That looks like this:

 

https://www.primecables.ca/p-322274-cab-7292-t-adapter-6p4c-1m2f-monoprice

 

The XB6 modem is supposed to be able to run both telephone ports using the same phone number, which would require tech support to change the appropriate setting, however, I really don’t know if tech support is aware of this.

 

Fwiw, having the phone modem, in whatever shape it comes in, parked downstairs is the typical approach that’s been around forever, given that all of the house telephone wiring converges at one place.  That way, all of the house telephone signal levels should be the same or very close to it.  Now, with the modem parked upstairs, connected to a telephone jack, the telephone signaling has to travel downstairs and then out to the house telephones.  In theory you shouldn’t notice a difference, but, keep this in mind when you’re using one of the other telephones in the house.  You will have to determine if the telephone ring, and audio, inbound and outbound are ok, given the signal run downstairs and then outwards, with the XB6 sitting somewhere upstairs.

 

 

Ethernet:

 

You should buy at least one, maybe two unmanaged gigabit switches.

 

The XB6 has two gigabit ports, so you can connect one unmanaged gigabit switch to the modem, at the modem location.  That will give you enough gigabit ports, at the modem location, to run everything that you now run via ethernet.

 

Does your house have ethernet cabling installed?  If you’ve never looked at this, pull one of the wallplates off of the wall and have a look behind the wallplate to see if there are any other cables sitting there, without any connectors installed.  If so, you should determine if there is a Cat 5, or 5e cable installed.  That is usually blue in colour.  The cable type will be printed on the cable jacket.

 

If you happen to have ethernet cable in the house, available at all cable / telephone wallplates, then you can use the nearest ethernet cable to run downstairs from the intended modem location.  That cable would connect to another unmanaged gigabit switch, which would then connect to all of the other etherent cables which run to the other rooms upstairs.

 

As for the router running in bridge mode, there shouldn’t be any problem keeping that running in its current configuration.

 

The Xi6-A and Xi6-T set top boxes have a power, ethernet and HDMI connector available.  So, you can run the set top boxes via ethernet, but, be aware that they insist on running a wifi connection with the XB6 and appear to exhibit poor performance if the wifi connection isn’t great, even though there might be a perfectly good ethernet connection running.  Don’t know why Comcast or Rogers insisted on maintaining a wifi connection to the modem when the set top box is connected via ethernet.

 

Food for thought, if it turns out that you don’t have any Cat 5 or 5e cabling installed but not used, you can also use the existing RG-6 cabling that is currently in use to support the Nextbox.  I’m assuming that the cabling installed throughout the home is RG-6, but, maybe not.  If you have a look at the cabling that runs inside the walls, which usually runs downstairs to the same telephone wiring location, you should be able to check the labeling on the side of the cable jacket.  It will hopefully be RG-6, but, it might be the older RG-59, depending on the age of the house.

 

You can run ethernet over cable, using MoCA adapters such as the Actiontec ECB6250 (MoCA 2.5 spec) or the ECB6200 (MoCA 1.0 spec). MoCA 2.5 is the latest MoCA spec.

 

https://www.actiontec.com/products/home-networking/ecb6250-sp/

 

Looking at the Actiontec site, there is also a new product out to support four gigait ethernet ports, essentially a gigabit switch that connects to the cable system of the home.  That could take the place of the router that is currently running in Bridge mode.

 

https://www.actiontec.com/products/home-networking/moca-network-adapter-ecb5240m/

 

There is also a gocoax MoCA 2.5 version of the MoCA adapter (WF-803M). These are fairly new to the market, compared to the Actiontec adapters which have been around for a while.

 

https://www.gocoax.com/products

 

The gocoax adapter don’t appear to play very well with adapter or equipment made by other manufacturers. So, its either gocoax or actiontec, not both running on the same cable system.

 

 

So, these adapters basically use the house cable system in place of ethernet cabling.  This isn’t a cheap route, but, if the house cable system is up to spec, you should be able to achieve gigabit rates throughout the house.  It should very reliable compared to powerline adapters or wifi.

 

You would also need to install a MoCA filter on the inbound cable from the street to prevent leakage of MoCA data outside of the house, and to protect the house network from external MoCA networks, where their owner isn’t running a MoCA filter on their cable line.

 

Additionally, you would need to replace the existing splitter or powered amplifier with a MoCA 2.5 splitter.  Rogers does have these available, or, you can obtain a MoCA splitter from Holland Electronics:

 

http://www.hollandelectronics.com/catalog/catalog.php?product_id=catv-moca-splitter

 

 

Now, when you receive the XB6 modem and Xi6-A or Xi6-T set top boxes you will need to remove the existing internet modem, Nextboxes and Home Phone modem.  If you own the Nextboxes, then you can keep them and sell them if you desire.  If you’re renting the Nextboxes, then they should be returned to Rogers along with the internet modem and Home Phone modem.  I think the routine these days is to pack them up and either mail them or return them via courier.  You should be able to print the return address from a reference somewhere here in the forum. Hopefully the arriving equipment will have the return instructions and mail/courier instructions along with it.

 

The existing splitter should be removed as well, keep that for now, in case you need it in the future. It should be replace with an F-81 connector that looks like this:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/ideal-3ghz-f-splice-adapter-10-pack-/1000751479

 

 

That F-81 connector will connect the incoming cable to the cable that runs upstairs to the intended modem location for the XB6 modem.  Using the connector will prevent any signal losses through the existing splitter. There is always the chance that you might need some level of signal drop in case the signal levels for the XB6 are too high.

 

Fwiw, if you log into your existing modem, navigate to the DOCSIS WAN tab and copy the entire signal table, starting and the Downstream Overview line and down the the very bottom right hand corner of the Upstream Overview or the bottom of the OFDM/OFDMA section if you happen to have the white CODA-4582 modem.  Park your curser at the front of the Downstream Overview line, hold down the shift key and mouse down to the bottom of the table, which will select and highlight that entire section.  Release the shift key and right click on the selected area, select …. Copy.  Then in a new post, right click …. Paste. That should paste in the entire table as it appears in the modem.

 

Please have a look at the splitter in the basement and determine which port the internet modem is connected to.  If its a multi-port splitter, it should be connected to a -3 dB port, or to the VOIP port. Please let me know which port the internet modem is connected to.

 

Ok, that should do it for now. If you have further questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

 

 

 



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Posts: 1,676

Re: Rogers Ignite TV - Alternate wifi/connection possibilities


@scoakeley wrote:

Hi and help!

I have the Ignite package scheduled for delivery next weekend and I want to be sure it will work for me.

I currently have Rogers home phone modem located in my basement mechanical room where it plugs into my home twisted pair phone lines.  I have three different phones plugged into wall jacks.


Hi, Simon.  Do you have a monitored home alarm system installed?  If you do not, then this should be a fairly straightforward installation.  If you do, and do not have any Ethernet cabling to the rooms of your house, then this installation could be difficult to do cleanly.  I will assume that this will be an easy install.

 

To start off, I would install the Ignite modem on the top floor of your home, where your current modem is located.

 

To hook up your telephone service, simply disconnect the Rogers Phone modem in your basement.  You can then connect the Ignite modem's "TEL 1" jack to your nearest telephone wall jack, and this will back-feed the other wall jacks in your house.  If you need to connect a wired telephone in this same room, purchase a 2-Way Telephone Splitter and plug it into the back of the modem.  Plug the splitter into the modem, then connect one jack on the splitter to the wall jack, the other to the telephone.

 

Then I have cable feeds to four different tvs.


Those set-top boxes will connect by WiFi.

 

Finally I have my wifi modem/router located on the top floor of my townhouse.  I'm using all four ethernet ports on the back of it; one for a NAS, one for an IP phone and, one for a google mesh wifi router and one for a Phillips lighting base control.


The Ignite modem only has two Ethernet ports but the Rogers tech should be able to provide you with a small Gigabit Ethernet desktop switch to provide you with additional ports.

 

The next decision that you will have to make is what you will do for WiFi connectivity in your home.  Will you be using your existing WiFi gear or will you be installing Rogers Ignite WiFi Pods?

 

In addition, I have another router set up as a bridge near my main tv to connect to three ethernet enabled (but not wifi enabled) bits of equipment.


You can continue to use this configuration if it is working well for you.

 

If you choose to go with the Ignite WiFi Pods, you might be able to eliminate this piece of equipment.  The Ignite Pods have an Ethernet jack for connecting wired devices.  You will need to add another small Ethernet switch to expand the number of ports.  However, this may or may not buy you anything.  If your Wi-Fi bridge provides faster connectivity than a Pod, then it is not worth doing.  If you are connecting more devices than the Pods's internal switch architecture allows, then this will not be possible.  (Sorry, I don't know what the device limitation is.)

 

If I understand correctly I need to locate my Ignite modem close to power, cable and telephone jacks--all ok.  The kitchen springs to mind.  I can then plug two things into the ethernet ports--is that correct? but then everything else that needs to be "hard-wired" will need to go through modems that are conifigured as bridges--correct???

Unless I am missing something, it might be better to install the Ignite modem upstairs.

 

From what I can see on the Rogers site (the help really isn't very helpful) the TV Ignite boxes have an ethernet port.  Is this port usable?


This jack can only be used to connect the set-top box to an Ethernet network.

 

Thanks for any help.

 

Simon


No problem.  I hope that this (hopefully) simple installation option will work for you.

 

One other thing: you will also probably need to clean up the coax wiring in your home.  You will need to remove the splitter that feeds your wall jacks; they are not needed anymore.  The Rogers tech can also provide you with an F81 "barrel connector" to link the coax cable for the incoming Rogers service to the coax cable going to your Ignite modem.

 

Best of luck with your installation next week.