Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

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Datalink
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Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

@Cricketej do you have an alarm system, which typically is installed near the basement structured wiring cabinet, or, do you have ethernet cabling connected to the modem, which normally terminates in the structured wiring cabinet. 

 

With the modem in the basement, its a simple task to install the 2.5 Gb/s Actiontec Adapters.  You need two, one upstairs and one downstairs.  Find the RG-6 cable that runs upstairs from the structured wiring cabinet.  Install one adapter at each end, connected to the RG-6 cable.  For the upstairs cable port, you will need a short RG-6 cable to connect to the cable port and Actiontec adapter.  

 

Connect one of the modem's LAN ports to the ethernet port of the Actiontec adapter in the basement.  Connect the ethernet port of the upstairs Actiontec adapter to a gigabit switch or directly into the device in question.  Fire up the adapters and you should have an operating ethernet LAN (over coax) between the basement and upstairs.  

 

Just to note, all of the 2.5 Gb/s MoCA adapters, at least as far as I'm aware, use a chipset manufactured by MaxLinear.  Maxlinear bought Intel's Home Connected Division, so, MaxLinear is now responsible for developing the Puma Modem product line.  That product line includes modems such as the Hitron CODA-4582, the XB6 (Arris TG-3482ER) and probably one variant of the newer XB7.  Don't quote me on the XB7 variant.  I'll have to do a little reading to confirm that.

 

Fwiw, it appears that Actiontec has sluffed off its tech support to another company, and the support provided by that company appears to be rather lacking to say the least.  It should be possible to log into the adapter to check the signal stats and determine what MoCA band the adapters are using.  I wouldn't necessarily assume that the adapters are set to utilize the MoCA D Band, which would provide the highest performance level possible.  With a direct connection, from one adapter to another, its possible that the adapters could autotune down to a lower frequency, given that the modem wouldn't be running on that same cable, but, without any documentation from Actiontec, the users will never know what the adapters really do, in terms of their frequency management.  

 

Fwiw, there are a couple of other manufacturers, including gocoax and starlink.  Here's a link to starlink's site:

 

https://starlink7.com/MoCA.html

 

Have a look at all of the pdf documents, especially the MN25xx Configuration guide.  That shows the login procedure for the Starlink adapters and the various pages of the user interface.  The gocoax configuration document is similar, but I don't recall if the login procedure is identical.  That would be useful given the complete lack of documentation from Actiontec, or at least that was the state of affairs not so very long ago.  

 

Also have a look at the specification for MoCA 2.5 located here:

 

http://www.mocalliance.org/MoCA2.5/specification.htm

 

Have a look at page 9 which shows the MoCA 2.0 frequency plan and also page 13 which shows the MoCA 2.5 frequency plan.  Looking at those charts will help to understand the usage of D-Low, D-High and D-Extended bands as indicated in the Starlink configuration guide. 

 

Just to note, Actiontec's 2.5 Gb/s adapters only have one cable port, so for your intended purpose, their fine as you're going point to point on a single cable.  For other applications, where users are planning on using the same cable that the modem uses, that requires an additional wide band 2 port splitter to feed the modem and adapter.  The other 2.5 Gb/s adapters all appear to have an inbound and outbound cable port, which allows users to employ those adapters on the same cable that the modem is using.  If you're ever planning on using the adapters on the same cable that the modem is currently using, keep these points in mind. 

 

Also note, as you will probably use the one cable run from the basement to upstairs, that means that you won't need a MoCA Point of Entry filter on the inbound cable from the street.  If you ever plan on using the adapters on the modem's cable, then you will need to install a MoCA Point of Entry Filter. 

 

Any questions, please let me know. 



Cricketej
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

I have an alarm system connected in the basement. There is one line of coax coming from outside which is connected to one of the connections in the basement. The modem is connected to this coax connection. So now I need to instal the Moca 2.5 which has only one coax connection.
Datalink
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Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

I'm assuming then that the alarm is connected directly to the modem.  Do you also have a house telephone system running, which is connected via telephone cabling to all of the rooms in the house and are those upstairs telephone ports working?  If so that implies that the tech installed a telephone splitter on the back of the modem. 

 

To find the correct cables, its useful to have one of these on hand, which can be used to test coax and ethernet cables:

 

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/sperry-instruments-cable-test-plus-coax-utp-stp-tstr-tests-for-open...

 

However, in your case, if you already have the adapters, install the upstairs adapter in the room that it will be used in and power it up.  Then power up the adapter in the basement, and, one at a time, try the existing RG-6 cables that I'm assuming all have connectors attached.  When you find and connect the correct cable, one or more LEDs on the adapter should flash, indicating that the adapter is syncing with the upstairs adapter.  At that point, connect the basement adapter to one of the modem's LAN ports and connect the upstairs adapter to the required device via ethernet cable.  

 

Food for thought, if you don't use the home's telephone cabling, it is possible to park the modem upstairs and change the telephone cabling at the structured wiring cabinet so that the one telephone cable run from upstairs connects directly to the alarm system.  Thats a very minor change, which only means pulling two wires off of the 66 block in the structured wiring cabinet.  Keep this in mind if you find that you're not getting the wifi performance upstairs that you expect.  The basement is normally the worst place for a modem or router, unless you make good use out of the basement.  

 

@Cricketej is the modem running in its default Gateway mode?  In that mode the adapters can be connected to the modem via ethernet.  If the modem was running in Bridge mode, you would need a router connected to the modem, and then the local adapter would be connected to the router. 



Cricketej
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

So I don't need to connect the coax from the adapter to the wall. I can just connect the ethernet cable from the gateway to the MOCA adapter. Thanks

Datalink
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Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

@Cricketej I'm not sure if you're making a statement or asking a question.  Here's what I would expect you to see in your home:

 

1.  Upstairs, at the location in question, you should have a wallplate with a cable F-81 connector on it.  You would need to connect a short RG-6 cable to that wallplate connector and connect the other end of the RG-6 cable to the adapter.

 

2.  In the basement, you might have a structured wiring cabinet, where all of the house cabling converges.  These would include the TV/Satellite RG-6 cables, ethernet Cat-5e/6 cables (if present) and telephone Cat-3 (possibly Cat-5e) cables. 

 

I'm anticipating that the tech or yourself would have placed the modem in or near the structured wiring cabinet, connecting to the incoming RG-6 cable from the street, and connecting via the telephone port to the alarm system.  The tech or yourself might have left a splitter in place if you had Rogers services before the XB6 modem.  If thats the case, then the only cables that should connect to that splitter is the inbound cable from the street and the cable that connects the modem.  All other cables would be disconnected from that splitter.  That should leave you in a situation where those unoccupied cables are left hanging in the cabinet, available for use.  One of those cables should be the one that runs upstairs to the other adapter.  Its just a matter of trying each cable, connecting it to the adapter by securing down the cable connector onto the adapter port.  It only has to be connected enough to make contact with the adapter port, doesn't have to be tight at this stage.  When the cable is connected to the adapter, it will probably take 15 to 30 seconds (educated guess) for that adapter to start syncing with the upstairs adapter.  When you find that cable, then you can hand tighten it. 

 

Now, if the modem is sitting somewhere else in the basement, connected thru a wallport connector, that means that you would need a 2 port wide band splitter connected to the wallport connector.  From that splitter, the modem and adapter would be connected.  You would also need to replace your existing splitter with a MoCA 2.0 qualified splitter and you would have to install a MoCA Point of Entry filter on the inbound cable from the street.  That MoCA Point of Entry filter prevents any of your MoCA data from leaking out into the neighbourhood and leaking into your network from the neighbourhood.  If the basement adapter is sharing the modem cable, you really want to ensure that you have a MoCA Point of Entry filter installed.

 

Hopefully this all makes sense.......



soupy
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 23

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

Recently, I've had multiple devices across different platforms generating STUN binding requests to 10.254.1.3.

Which is concerning because I don't use 10.0.0.0/8 internally.

 

All I can think of is either a) a firmware issue in my router, or b) Rogers is announcing bogons, which I have no idea how to prove.

 

So far, I've rebooted my routers and blocked 10.0.0.0/8 in the firewall, which has stopped the STUN requests from getting out, but the traffic is still happening.  Any other suggestions are appreciated.

Datalink
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Posts: 7,368

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

@soupy load Wireshark on a pc and watch the network.  You don't have to be a protocol guru to read thru the captured data.  Hopefully the source of the requests will standout among the LAN traffic.  



soupy
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 23

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

Thanks, @Datalink, I'll give that a shot.
-G-
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Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

@soupy  What equipment are you using in your in-home network?  FYI, word is spreading about "bad guys" exploiting vulnerabilities in firewall and remote access code in devices from multiple vendors that allows them to establish a tunnel to the internal network(s).  Details are sketchy at the moment but I suspect that we will get more information when this news hits the usual mainstream tech sites.



-G-
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Posts: 2,361

Re: Ignite cable modem - MoCA, Firewall settings

Okay, here's a taste of what I was talking about, but I think that there could be more to this:

 

https://www.securityweek.com/zyxel-warns-customers-attacks-security-appliances
https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2021/06/zyxel-scrambles-to-thwart-active-hacks-targeting-customers-f...

 

As I said, details (and the potential size and scope) are still pretty scarce.