Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

Regret my decision to move to Ignite!

Every time you change the change there is pixelization for about 10 to 15 seconds until the stream "catches up".

 

But the killer for me is the motion blur on fast moving sports like hockey.

I bought two Panasonic plasmas before they dropped the technology just enjoy as fast a response for as long as possible.

 

Since moving from cable the motion blur is driving me nuts. The picture is also less vivid - the colours seem flat.

 

If you are thinking about migrating to Ignite and hate motion blur - stay with cable.

 

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Posts: 614

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

Hello @nanook60,

 

 Welcome to the Rogers Community Forums!

 

I can understand how having the screen pixelate every time you change channels can be a nuisance, especially on a Plasma TV. =(

 

When you tune to a channel, it has to download the content before it can display on your TV.  This can cause a slight pixelation effect for a few seconds, 10 - 15 seconds seems a bit excessive. It is possible there is a weak WiFi signal which could cause this type of pixelation. Does it go away completely after the time frame you mentioned?

 

I have not noticed any "motion blur" when watching sports and I am a pretty big sports buff. I will admit that all of my TV's are LED not Plasma. Are there any other users in the Community using a Plasma TV with the Ignite TV system who are noticing the same type of "motion blur"?

 

We look forward to your response!

 

RogersTony

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

I asked this question before but received no reply so let's try here.  Ignite is being marketed as a WIFI system.  I assume you are connecting from your ignite modem to your TV box by WIFI along with your other devices.  I understand the lag issue so I wonder if you connected the modem directly to the TV box with a Cat 6 cable if this would help. You should get the full speed of the fiber optics directly to your TV and leave the WIFI connections for your less important devices.  Would this help or eliminate the lag?  I do not have Ignite yet but your answer might influence my decision to switch over.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

Wish it were so - I am connected via Ethernet and not wifi.......

Edit:
whoops my mistake the installer did NOT use a physical connection.
I will try connecting a CAT cable tonight before the hockey game and report back.

Thank you for getting me to check this item.
Resident Expert
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Posts: 13,823

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

Mine may take maybe a split second to tune in at full HD, but definitely not 10-15.
(this is really worrying me.. that the techs setting this up are NOT doing proper testing to ensure proper wifi setup, signal, etc..)

I wish I had a plasma to compare with.. I only have LCD and LED, and dont notice it myself.

Hmm.. i wonder what the box is actually outputting.. i have never really checked on my TV.
I wonder if its something to do with the refresh rate?  
I know on my current TV, it only fully supports 60hz.  But the TV has a 120 psudo mode.. its supposed to emulate 120, but its not a true 120.  I found with that setting on, even on cable, got a lot of motion blur.  Turning it off the tv was fine.



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Posts: 5,997

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

The problem here is understanding the order of the networks that the Xi6-A uses to connect to the modem, the choices being 2.4 Ghz, 5 Ghz and ethernet.  The Xi6-A boxes are set up by the installation techs to run via wifi.  The question is, does an ethenet connection take first place in the precedence if you connect the Xi6-A via ethenet cable?  

 

Maybe Ignite TV users can comment on this one.  I'd like someone who is experiencing problems with pixelation to run an experiment, and that is to connect the Xi6-A via ethernet to see what the box does.  If pixelation is a constant problem and it clears up with the ethernet connection, then maybe that shows that the Xi6-A switches over to ethernet.  If there's no difference, disable both 2.4 and 5 Ghz wifi networks in the modem which will force the Xi6-A to run via ethernet.  Hopefully that will clear up the issue.  If not, then you might have problems with your RG-6 cabling, either internal, external or both.  That's the first issue that should be addressed.  

 

In order to do this you might need a 50 or 75 foot Cat-6 cable.  Fwiw, its worth having a cable such as that available to use for troubleshooting purposes.  

 

If I'm not mistaken, when the installation tech sets up the modem and Xi6-A set top boxes, WPS is normally used to pair the Xi6-A to the modem.  I suspect that this allows the Xi6-A to pair with both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  Don't quote me on this however.  It would depend on whether or not WPS was enabled for both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks in the modem wifi settings when the Xi6-As were paired to the modem.  I suspect that with WPS enabled for both networks, once paired, the Xi6-A would then be able to use either network, as it sees fit.  Taking my neighbourhood as an example, there are 35 to 40 or more, 2.4 networks that are visible at any time.  The 2.4 Ghz band is basically a write off, so the last thing I want is for the Xi6-A to attempt to use the 2.4 Ghz network.  I already know that the 2.4 Ghz network doesn't provide acceptable performance.  The solution, run ethernet to everything that is fixed in place and use 5 Ghz for whats left.  That works very well.  We don't have Ignite TV service and if we ever had it installed, I'd force the Xi6-A to run via ethernet by pairing the box to the modem using temporary wifi networks.  After that is done, if only to satisfy the Xi6-A setup, I'd change the wifi networks back to their normal network names and passphrases, forcing the Xi6-A to operate via ethernet.  The Xi6-A might not be happy about it, but with an ethernet connection running, it should work as expected.  

 

Would that help with the lag as questioned by @Leader905 ?  Good question.  At the end of the day, if the answer to that is no, then the problem lies further upstream, at the neighbourhood node, CMTS or beyond, possibly with the Rogers server capacity.  

 

The one problem with a wifi based service is that you have to be absolutely sure of your wifi environment.  You really need to know who else around you is running wifi networks and be somewhat aware of any possible impact on your wifi networks.  That requires an occasional glance, at the very least to see what channel(s) other wifi networks are using.  If you're lucky, you might not have much competition.  I usually take a look at this once a week or more, just to see who's out there.  If you happen to live in a condo or townhouse complex then you might be fighting with your neighbours for both 2.4 and 5 Ghz channels, which won't do you much good for any device.  So, even before thinking about installing a wifi, IPTV service, have a look at your wifi environment to see who else is running wifi networks, and determine if your plan for a wifi tv service will work or not.  You should be looking at and using the 5 Ghz channel 149 region and above, in order to make use of the higher allowed power levels in those channels.  If your tv is close enough to the modem, then you might be able to use the lower channel 36 region, but, that has a much lower power output level.  Although the installation tech will install the Eero mesh network to resolve signal level issues, that won't resolve a crowded wifi environment where all users on a given channel have to share the available bandwidth on that channel.  

 

Personal opinion, nothing beats wired ......  my 2¢.



Community Manager
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Posts: 3,349

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

 

 

The refresh rate of the TV may play some part in the motion blur.  Take for instance fast paced first person shooter video games; anything less that 120hz refresh rate will lend you to have motion blur. Seen it, tried, tested and true. At 60hz, you're asking for motion blur.

 

This also comes into affect in sports, and sometimes in action scenes in a movie.  I personally have a 42" LG Plasma with a 120hz refresh rate and have only ever experience motion blur once, over 5 years ago playing Black Ops. Besides that, I stream and broadcast my IgniteTV, Netflix and video games in HD and have no motion blur to speak of.

 

Refresh rate is KEY for plasma TVs. Which was part of the reason the technology was abandoned in favor of LED.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

I don’t want to go off topic of the thread but motion blur, or plasma technology’s relative lack thereof, was not dictated by refresh rates as the method in which they rendered their picture was different from LED.

So I respectfully beg to differ, refresh rate, which dictated LED motion performance, was not nearly as meaningful as a motion performance measurement in plasmas.

The bigger factors in plasma’s demise focused on their weight, energy consumption and the showroom eye candy appeal of a really bright display - all LED’s strong suits.

Once those issues took hold with the buying public, the economies of scale tipped heavily to LED’s and sealed plasma’s fate.
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Posts: 2,638

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

@nanook60 : I optimized Home Theatres in the GTA for over 10 years and agree with all your points.  Plasmas and LCDs (LEDs) display pictures totally differently. Rather than try to summarize here, I've included a pretty good article below for those interested in those sorts of details:

 

https://www.lifewire.com/what-is-a-sub-field-drive-1847853

 

Perhaps if people can experiment as suggested by @Datalink we can get closer to the bottom of the picture quality issues that quite a few people are seeing - whether it's Rogers' server capacity, the RF-coax signal to your home or WiFi bandwidth in your home...

 

PS.  Although I don't have IgniteTV, I recently upgraded my Internet from 30/5 to 75/10u.  I noticed that at the far end of my home my WiFi had dropped significantly over the years, probably due to neighbours, etc.  I was only getting 2-5 mbps in my basement even with the new 75/10, with my Rogers modem bridged (and Airport Extreme router) both on the second floor. The house is pretty small, but the WiFi was no longer acceptable for my TV's apps like YouTube.  My home was renovated in 1990 (without Ethernet) and it would not have been easy for me to run Ethernet, so I purchased a Powerline adapter kit (with WiFi).  My TV (and Laptop) are now "hard wired" in the basement and getting 95/10.  I'm also getting 70-90 on WiFi in the basement.  For those interested, I purchase a TP-Link TL-WPA8630 kit and this is discussed in the following link

 

https://www.digitalhome.ca/forum/51-home-computing/171986-powerline-adapter-discussions-2.html#post3...   which is a summary post - scroll up to see the previous posts in that thread:

 

Anyone who has WiFi problems, where it's not easy to run Ethernet, may wish to consider such an option.



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Posts: 5,997

Re: Ignite TV - Stay with Cable if you Hate Motion Blur

While powerline adapters can work, the success or failure with that adapter depends on your total electrical path, from the initial electrical outlet, to and thru the electrical panel and out to the remote end electrical outlet.  One problem that users encounter is noise, and that is partly a product of the path from start to finish.  

 

If you happen to have cable runs to those rooms, preferably RG-6, I'd recommend using MoCA ethernet to cable adapters.  There are a few models available as well as MoCA connected wifi extenders.  This  installation also requires a MoCA 2.0 qualified splitter and a MoCa Point of Entry Filter installed on the cable that arrives from the local tap (street pedestal or utility pole).

 

If you don't have cable outlets in the desired rooms, and wifi isn't cutting it, then you would have to consider placing a Wifi access point closer to the intended target, running ethernet somehow, or as suggested, using powerline adapters.