Devices connecting to pods

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Devices connecting to pods

I have three pods throughout my house. It's seems that all my house devices only connect to my modem. I can be right infront of a pod and not connect to it...why?

 

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Posts: 1,567

Re: Devices connecting to pods

Hello, @Juice77.

 

Welcome to Rogers Community Forums! 😃

 

Thank you for posting your query in the Community. We need more details to comment on this situation; please provide modem and pods details. Did the tech installed the pods, or is it a self install?

 

I'm assuming it's the Ignite TV service with three pods installed to extend WiFi coverage throughout the home. Are you looking at the devices connection status through Rogers Ignite WiFi Hub app?

 

We look forward to hearing from you!

 

Cheers,
RogersMoin

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Posts: 4

Re: Devices connecting to pods

I'm noticing the same thing, kind of. I have Ignite TV, internet, phone home and 3 wifi extender pods. Everything was installed by a Rogers Tech. Everything seems to be working ok, but I notice on the wifi hub app that all wifi devices in the home are connecting to the same pod. Regardless of where the person is physically located in the house, all devices are connecting to the same pod even if one is literally right beside the person. All 3 pods were positioned in different locations in the house to ensure maximum coverage. I have confirmed in the app that all pods are connected and online. All my TV ignite boxes are wired with CAT5, so they aren't using wifi. Just wondering if it's normal to have all wifi devices in the house connect to the same pod all the time? If so, what are the other 2 pods there for? Thanks.
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Re: Devices connecting to pods


@Juice77 wrote:

I have three pods throughout my house. It's seems that all my house devices only connect to my modem. I can be right infront of a pod and not connect to it...why?


The radios in the Pods operate at a lower power level than the Wi-Fi radios in the XB6 modem, so it's possible that your devices are simply connecting to the Wi-Fi access point with the strongest signal.

 

If a device connects to the XB6 first then, depending on the device, it may not even try to roam to another stronger/local access point unless the RSSI on the connection drops below -70 dBm.

 

If you go to a more distant Pod with a mobile device, disconnect from Wi-Fi, then reconnect, do you connect to the Pod or to the modem?



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Re: Devices connecting to pods


@scott435645645 wrote:
I'm noticing the same thing, kind of. I have Ignite TV, internet, phone home and 3 wifi extender pods. Everything was installed by a Rogers Tech. Everything seems to be working ok, but I notice on the wifi hub app that all wifi devices in the home are connecting to the same pod. Regardless of where the person is physically located in the house, all devices are connecting to the same pod even if one is literally right beside the person.

The Pods (made by Plume) support 802.11k and 802.11v, so they do support the critical standards that facilitate Wi-Fi roaming: https://support.plume.com/hc/en-us/articles/115001797928-Pod-Device-Release-Notes

 

However, not all devices support these standards and if they don't, they may not roam to another Pod unless the RSSI on the connection drops below a critical point where they will actively try to connect to another AP with stronger signal.

 

If you disconnect a mobile device from Wi-Fi and then reconnect, do you connect to the local Pod or do you still reconnect to the more distant pod?



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Posts: 4

Re: Devices connecting to pods

Thanks for the reply and helpful info. I tested my newer device (Galaxy S10+) by just moving from one part of the house to the other and roaming works well. I did the same thing with an older laptop and roaming didn't work. Once I turned wifi off and on agian on that laptop, it connected to the closest pod. Answers all of my questions and solves my issue. Thanks!
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Posts: 4

Re: Devices connecting to pods

I just finished an interesting experiment. I did a wifi speed test and found that I was getting an average of 145 Mbps when connected to a pod. Results were the same for all pods. When wifi connected to the modem itself the average result was 575 Mbps (sitting literally right beside the modem, which is installed in the basement). So I thought, let me unplug all pods and see what speeds I get connecting wifi at the modem at different parts of the house, instead of connecting to pods. Average speeds ranged from 560 Mbps on main floor to 215 Mbps upstairs. So I'm getting significantly higher speeds without any pods. Does this make sense and I assume I shouldn't use these pods because I don't need them?
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Devices connecting to pods

Just spoke with Rogers Tech Support. Apparently the pods are completely optional and the installer should have done tests to see if they were actually required before installing. Anyhow, if wifi strength and speeds are better without the pods, don't use them as they are not needed. The fact that my TV boxes are hard wired with CAT5 cables really makes the choice of not using the pods a no brainer. Anyway, just thought I would provide an update.
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Re: Devices connecting to pods

1.  Is there a reason that the modem is in the basement?  Technician's decision to take the easy way out, ethernet connections to other parts of the house perhaps or you use wifi in the basement?  If you're not using wifi in the basement or using any ethernet connections to other points in the house, which would originate in the basement, then the basement would be the worst place for the modem.  Only other reason I can think of is that you don't have any RG-6 cables running upstairs.

 

2.  With the modem in the basement, you seeing pretty fair results for wifi speeds with your laptop.  The one point to remember is that the laptop might have much better wifi performance than a set top box that is wifi connected.  Are you using the Ignite TV service?  If so, then the set top boxes need a wifi connection, regardless of any ethernet connection. 

 

3.  What modem are you using:  

     a.  a black Hitron CGN3xxx modem where the modem model is found on the product sticker at the

          back of the modem;

     b.  a white Hitron CODA-4582 modem; 

     c.  an XB6 modem which is installed with the new Ignite TV service.

 

4.  The wifi speeds do make sense.  It depends on the design of the pods and how they are running.  It comes down to a question of are they running as a repeater, extender or possibly mesh node with a wifi backhaul channel.  With the modem in the basement, and the laptop there as well, you're seeing pretty respectable speeds for a laptop.  The basement location would shield the modem from external networks, to a certain degree, so you would or should see better performance with both modem and laptop in the basement.  The same might not occur if the modem was on the main floor, where it can detect nearby networks and end up with a smaller transmit time allocation, which in turn drops the wifi data rate. 

 

5.  Its worth having a look at the wifi environment to determine who else you're competing with for channels.  It sounds like you're using a 5 Ghz channel.  To see the longest range and highest data rate with 5 Ghz, use channels 149 to 161 as they run a higher power output compared to the lower 5 Ghz channels.  Do you have a wifi scanner loaded on your laptop that you can use to check the wifi environment and see who you're competing with?



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Re: Devices connecting to pods


@scott435645645 wrote:
Just spoke with Rogers Tech Support. Apparently the pods are completely optional and the installer should have done tests to see if they were actually required before installing. Anyhow, if wifi strength and speeds are better without the pods, don't use them as they are not needed. The fact that my TV boxes are hard wired with CAT5 cables really makes the choice of not using the pods a no brainer. Anyway, just thought I would provide an update.

Implementing Wi-Fi well can be tricky and a number of factors need to be considered so that you not only get optimal coverage and optimal speeds but also so that you minimize the impact on the local Wi-Fi environment.

 

So many people take the approach of getting a router (or multiple routers) with the "biggest, baddest" Wi-Fi and cranking the power to maximum.  In reality, more power is not always better.  A strong signal may be able to reach the farthest reaches of a home with challenging construction... but on the other end of the link may be a mobile phone with a low-power transmitter whose signal can barely be discerned from the background noise.  In high-density environments, there can also be A LOT of background noise due to a lot of local Wi-Fi traffic on all channels, and more power in this situation is not better either.

 

With Pods, they take a different approach: low power and local coverage, and make it possible for devices to roam seamlessly from one pod to another.  You won't get the fastest speeds but you'll get a good, solid connection, and that's usually more important.  A low-power radio also minimizes the local Wi-Fi interference, and it's important to be a good neighbour in that regard just like you would keep the volume down on your stereo.

 

When deploying a Wi-Fi network, we have routers with conventional access points, mesh network solutions (like Pods) that provide local coverage with low-power radios, and mesh networks (like the eero) that provide broader coverage with higher-powered radios.  All of these technologies have their pros and cons.  The installation techs need to properly survey the home, consider issues and challenges associated with building construction, interference, layout and coverage requirements, and then implement the best/most reliable solution.

 

If the XB6 alone provides you with adequate coverage and you get solid, reliable Wi-Fi connectivity throughout home, then go with that.