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Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

Lornewolfe
I'm Here A Lot

My Rogers Home phone includes Canada Wide calling.

Several area codes include both local and long distance calls from my home. This should not matter to the home phone system. No calls should require a 1 before the area code as long as they are in Canada.

 

I have 2 cell phones and another non-Rogers VOIP phone. They all work properly. If does not matter if I dial a1 or not.

 

With The Rogers home phone:

If I dial a non-local # without a 1 it tells me to dial again with a 1

If I dial a local with a ! it tells me to dial again without the 1

It should not matter if I dial 1 1 or not, the calls should all go through. They do all go through with both my cell phones and my non rogers VOIP phone.

 

This is quite a pain when I am making multiple calls to an area code that includes both local and non-local calls.

 

This appears to be a through-back to the days when Canada-wide local calling was not normal as it is today. 

 

Can this get resolved? 

 

 

***Edited Labels***

 

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Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Lornewolfe wrote:

If I dial a non-local # without a 1 it tells me to dial again with a 1

If I dial a local with a ! it tells me to dial again without the 1

 

Can this get resolved? 


This has always been the norm with every phone service that I have ever had.  Local calls (to your area) always get dialed as 7 or 10 digit numbers, without the leading "1".  Long distance calls require the +1 or country code.

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Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Lornewolfe wrote:

If I dial a non-local # without a 1 it tells me to dial again with a 1

If I dial a local with a ! it tells me to dial again without the 1

 

Can this get resolved? 


This has always been the norm with every phone service that I have ever had.  Local calls (to your area) always get dialed as 7 or 10 digit numbers, without the leading "1".  Long distance calls require the +1 or country code.

Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
-G- is correct. If your calling a number within your local calling area so for example Toronto, you can simply dial the 10 digit number WITHOUT the 1, so your dialing 416-xxx-xxxx

but lets say you want to call another number that is within Canada but in another city such as OTTAWA, which is OUTSIDE your local calling area, then yes you would have to dial a "1" in front, so for example, 1-613-xxx-xxxx.

even by dialing 1, your not paying for long distance because you have Canada wide, but there have always existed rules about calling within or outside your Local Calling Area and the need to put a 1, this has always existed, some carriers are a little more relaxed on this policy however that does not mean just because one carrier loosened its rules that all should automatically follow. so just follow the instructions I stated and you should be good


Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
just remember, the rules for cellphones and VoIP providers might be different regarding putting the 1 IN front or not, so do not take those rules as the bible for all telephone providers


Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

The point is…

when Canada wide calls are not toll calls, you should not have to even individually detcide to dial a 1 or not. The phone system should simply place the call. That is how other phone systems that I use work. Why does Rogers still make me tell it the call is local or not when they are all local? Please catch up to the competition. 

Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Lornewolfe  Dialing the "1" has nothing to do with whether or not it is a toll call or a toll-free call.  A telephone number is actually a E.164 network address, and the "1" is the country code that is used when calling telephone numbers in member countries that use the North American Numbering Plan.  7 or 10-digit numbers are allowed when dialing telephone numbers in the local calling area.  For anything else, you need to dial the full telephone number.

 

Dialing the "1" may seem like a pain but it's a call routing thing, and expanding the 10-digit calling area to be anything that you can call toll-free with your phone plan complicates international calling and how digits are processed as you manually dial the number on a telephone.

Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

I have w cell phones and another voip phone they all woke if I dial a 1 or not. Only the Rogers voip phone system forces me to use the 1  even when it would have been a toll charge under the old system, and not dial the one when it would have been local under the old system. The main problem is that many calls in a single area code used to be long distance and many, in the same area code used to local. They are all toll free now, however Rogers forces me to dial the 1 sometimes and forces me to not dial the 1 sometimes. At her suppliers do not. That is my main issue. It is just a pain. 

Re: Rogers Home Phone, Have to Dial 1 for Calls

-G-
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

It's not as easy as you make it out to be.  The dial plan for most areas are complex enough, given that we need to support 3, 7, 10 and 11-digit numbers (and special numbers, e.g. for Operator Assistance) when calling within Canada.  If we eliminate the "1" when calling any NANP number, we run into problems when handling special numbers, such as 310-1010; how do you differentiate the partial dialing of a number in California vs a 310-xxxx local number, that also needs to do special call routing locally?  There are other use cases that need to be considered as well.

 

It's easier will cell phones, where the digits are not processed until you press the "call" button (the mobile provider can implement some conveniences because the call processing and routing is handled a bit differently), and you can implement any dial plan that you want on your own VoIP ATA, but it's problematic on telephone system implementations that process digits as they are dialed by conventional telephones, and that detect (and handle) a mis-dialed invalid number as it is being dialed.

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