Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 66

Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

I had a question about Rogers Home Phone -- is pulse (rotary dialing) supported?  If yes -- if you dial 1170 to turn off call waiting (11 = * on POTS), will it do that?

What happens on Rogers Home Phone when the other side hangs up and I don't?  Do I get a busy signal?  Does it go back to dial tone?  Does it "blip" the line (power cut for almost a second).

Answering machines look for some of these signals to hang up.  The Rogers Wireless Home Phone that I had generated a foreign busy signal that my stuff choked on.

 

***Edited Labels***

Retired Moderator RogersCilio
Retired Moderator
Posts: 390

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

Hello @DominicB,

 

Good question.  Unfortunately rotary dialing is not supported, because our phone service is Digital and not Analog, it would require a digitally compatible phone for all the features and codes to work properly.

 

We can not guarantee the features and service to work, without a compatible phone set.

 

Hope this helps,

RogersCilio

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,741

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone


@RogersCilio wrote:

Hello @DominicB,

 

Good question.  Unfortunately rotary dialing is not supported..


This information is incorrect. I used pulse on Rogers years ago and just tried it by switching one of my phones to pulse dial to call someone.    Pulse dialing does work.  I'm not sure if the "* features" work, but it should be easy for you to test one of them like 1167 or 1169.  Here's a link to the * features.

http://www.rogers.com/web/support/home-phone/calling-feature/122



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 66

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

Is your pulse dialing working on an Arris?  Try 1170 and then 1167 -- 11 should work for * on touch-tone too.  That was the standard anyway.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,741

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

@DominicB:

 

I'm confused.  In my last post I explained that you can dial using pulse dialing.  I also mentioned that it would be easy for you/or someone to test the features you want by say dialing 1167 before calling someone and having them confirm if the number was "blocked".  Or by dialing 11 instead of * in front of any of the other features that you may wish to test.  I certainly wouldn't trust what someone says on a forum - as you can see the Rogers Rep was incorrect about pulse dialing.

 

I don't use an answering machine since I have Rogers answering service as part of my home phone package (Online Manager).  Home & Away Voicemail provides more features than a machine - for example messages forwarded to my e-mail.

 

http://www.rogers.com/web/support/home-phone/calling-feature/21



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 66

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

I don't have the service right now.  To order it and find out that it doesn't work would be a waste of Rogers' time, and mine.  I would be using at least three lines, not one.

 

OSI Disconnect Supervision (winking) is important.  I'm not just using ordinary phones.  I have a mini-PBX for demonstration purposes, and analog "trunk" emulation (underneath Rogers is packet cable VOIP) requires that that signal be generated so that the PBX can release a trunk that is auto-answered by the auto attendant, because that is a machine, not a person.  The target could be an analog phone, a digital phone, or a VOIP phone, or a soft phone on my notebook.  SIP trunks deliver that message as "BYE".  The modem takes the BYE and generates a wink on the line, or it doesn't.  If they are not auto-answer, it doesn't matter -- when I hang up, the PBX hangs up.

It sounds confusing, but this is the way business lines work.  You call the main number, but that main number can use any free line in a line hunt group.  Rogers does this on business lines, but it's the same technology on Home Phone, except they don't offer line hunting on home phone.

Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 1,038

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

Good morning @DominicB,

 

If that is the type of service you're looking for, I can only recommend a business line as any third party equipment attached to our home phone modem is not officially supported. While it's possible it may work, we can't guarantee it and wouldn't be able to offer anything beyond basic troubleshooting with a phone connected directly to the modem.

 

RogersCorey

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 66

Re: Pulse on Rogers Home Phone

I agree.  I would be looking at Rogers business lines.  I just asked the question here because the same kind of modem is used on both except that one is a 2-line version whereas the other is a 4-line version.  They say it is PBX compatible, but that doesn't say much.

I'm in a new subdivision and Bell here is fiber only (what they call "Fibe") -- it's really VOIP for voice with a modem also, so I don't see any point staying with them.  What these modems do is attempt to "fake" or "lip sync" analog landlines, and I'm afraid they do a very poor job, because PBXs have electrical ears and can see that the modem is not on spec.  Arris modems I believe were originally developed by Nortel, and given that my PBX was Nortel, I was hoping there would be more compatibility with them.

That 1170 *70 equivalency is usually a strong indicator that the modem is "smart".  I've had nothing but problems with Bell, because ...

 

a) their modem does not generate the proper ring voltage

b) it does recognize pulse, but isn't accurate -- I don't normally use this except to demo rotary phones to kids

c) the sound quality is worse than Rogers

d) Rogers has 1g Ignite in our area

e) copper landlines with Bell in new subdivisions is not an option

My understanding was that Rogers initially used Nortel CS2000 softswitches back in 2006.  Things may have changed since then.  Those switches are very smart, but the modems must match because we don't attach to them directly through copper phone lines, but through coax.  That was 10 years ago -- Rogers may be using other equipment in my area (Bradford, ON), so I don't know.

I see though that Rogers offers a very small subset of the calling features that switch was capable of providing, which was everything Bell could do, and more.

Overall I'm very disappointed with Bell and I don't see any advantages to using their system for anything, so I was hoping somebody who has used it can tell me more.  There are no specs to be found anywhere.