Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 17

Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

After 43 years with Bell my mother is seriously considering leaving for rogers phone service. But after doing a little research for her, I found myself slightly confused. I was hoping someone here might have a simple straight answer.

 

i kept reading on some sites about Rogers Home phone, but noticed that on other web sites they would use the term wireless home phone. Is it the same service? If not what would be the difference?

 

my second question is about installation. She already has both digital cable and high speed internet. Would this new service require a technician to come out? She now lives alone, and is quite fearful of anyone at the door asking to get in. Would it be possible to just receive the equipment from a Rogers Store, and allow me a day or so later to plug in any equipment for her. Or does a technician need to work on the box outside for all this to work.

 

any input would be appreciated.

 

***EDITED LABELS***

Resident Expert
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Posts: 6,018

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Not sure about the Wireless Home Phone, perhaps one of the moderators or other REs could comment on that one.

 

There are a couple of scenarios that could happen, just depends on the current provider for your mother’s existing cable and internet.  In either case, it would require a technician if the Home Phone installation is the same as what I currently have, which is a fixed landline number running off of a dedicated Home Phone modem.

 

If the current provider is Rogers, then a tech would install a different cable splitter, install the Home Phone cable modem at the same location where the home’s telephone connector block sits, and then cut the existing Bell connection to patch in to the output cable from the Home Phone modem.  That’s only two wires that have be cut and patched over.  The existing phone service in the home would be used in the same manner as with the Bell service.  After patching in the Home Phone modem cable, the existing phone system wouldn’t know the difference between the two services.  You could park a cordless phone near one of the current phone outlets and connect that cordless phone to the outlet.  

 

The other scenario would come about if the cable and high speed internet provider was with a different company.  If it was a TPIA, using cable, then the same scenario as above would probably apply.  If this was provided by Bell for example, using fibre or DSL, then its possible that the Rogers tech would also have to run a cable from the local tap, which could be from a utility pole, or from a pedestal located near the home in the case of underground cabling in the neighborhood.  The connection to the pedestal would require a cable burial at some point.  As that requires a permit and locating the existing underground services, that could be several weeks down the road.  

 

So, it just depends on who the current provider is.  Either way, a technician will require access to the home, to install the Home Phone modem, and possibly to install a new cable to connect the modem.

 

There is one important difference to note between the Bell and Rogers systems.  The Bell service will continue to operate during a power outage as it uses external power supplied by the nearest Bell power backup.  That could be battery system or generator depending on the local system.  The phone will operate as long at that backup power system supplies power which I think would be more than a day or two.  On the other hand, the Rogers Home Phone modem contains a backup battery.  I have no idea how long that backup battery will last but I would be surprised if it lasted any longer than 3 to 4 hours.  I might be completely wrong on that one but, the battery isn’t very big.  So, one thing to consider is the necessity of a wired phone in the home.  If it turns out that this is a definite requirement, you might want to reconsider switching from Bell.  Same goes for VOIP.



Resident Expert
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Posts: 13,852

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

The battery is supposed to go up to 6 hours.. 

One thing to remember, is that with either system, you need to have a plain old wired phone to work.  Any wireless phone, or even wired ones which have display which require power, the phone wont work with no power.

I do agree though, that it is worth getting a tech out.

To ensure that everything is wired properly, signals are good, etc.
And that its connected in to the phone system within the house properly as well.

The main advantage of having the rogers home phone, would be that a possible cheaper bundle might be able to be attained, having the 3 services.

 


Wireless home phone.. thats a different beast alltogether.
While yes, in some cases can be CHEAPER than landline phone based..  it does have many more pitfalls.
Its pretty much a cell phone, in a box, which then provides dialtone, etc to make calls, etc.  The box needs to have a GOOD wireless signal to work, often requiring it to be then upstairs, etc.  It will be much more prone to issues when the power goes out, etc.



Resident Expert
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Posts: 2,493

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

My Godfather had the Wired Home Phone (The Traditional one) but recently switched to the Wireless Home Phone.

 

-He kept the same #,

-The monthly fee Decreased on wireless

-Wireless is Self Install - they treat it as a rogers wireless product so there is no tech dispatch for issues

-Wired home phone had a technician install a modem, so it had to be a professional install, not something you can do yourself

-both use the same phone jacks in your home

-not all reps were knowledgeable a bout the wireless home phone so he needed to push a bit to get to speak to a knowledgeable retail store rep who could answer questions and sell him one (not sure how someone could get a job at a rogers retail store and not know what they sell, but thats another story)

-you need good cellular signal for it to work good, so if ur cellphones typically get good coverage u should be ok, otherwise it might not be worth it.



I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 2,144

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

I would add only one more thing to the comments so far - the others have covered all I have looked into on the comparison of Home Phone versus Wireless Home Phone.

 

If you have a third party provider of services, they will actually give you instructions on how to do it and the required cross-over cable verus straight through (I won't try to explain that), a slitter and the connection hardware and you can do yourself.

 

Rogers will send out their techs and do the work for you, and third party companies will do the same.

 

If existing services are through a third party service provider of cable, most will discount your digital home phone connection and do phone number transfer for you.  Be sure to have the outside party do the port of the phone number and cancel service with Bell - don't do it yourself, as you will lose the number.

 

Third party providers will facilitate connection, and it is not necessary for them to involve Rogers at all, as it is nothing but a VOIP set up off your Internet connection, attaching to a VOIP server with all the phone features available.

 

Finally, I would suggest that unless you are knowledgeable of connections to traditional in home phone lines and how to properly patch from the box to your lines, I would suggest a professional install from whichever company.  If you are comfortable with researching the Internet, the company will give you instructions and phone support on self installs, and are comfortable with some trial and error to get it complete functional - example, if backwards on the wiring, you will have no phone services, but plugging into the box, a phone works, you then switch the wiring and low and behold it can work - even many Rogers techs have demonstrated their lack of knowledge, but if they get it wrong, you can call them back until it is right.

 

This issue with wireless home phone is signal strentgh, I have poor signal for cell in my home, so it is not an option, so be clear what your signal strength is like - it is cheaper though for sure.

 

Good luck - let us know how it goes.

 

Bruce

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 17

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Thank you all for your insight on this. I just thought it was a  voip box that you connected to your Rogers modem/router then just attached an existing phone, plugged it in and done.

 

 you’ve given me Great information thank you again.

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 17

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

A follow up question.

 

would anyone know if the wireless home phone service is available to everyone,or is it only for regions that don’t have landline/cable access such as rural areas of the country. I’ve gotten mixed signals on this point, and the Rogers web site doesn’t really answer my question. Thank you

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,852

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Just took a peek at the site..

When it FIRST came out, it was only available to places NOT covered by wired service.

I am not seeing anything on the page anymore saying this restriction anymore.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 17

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Yes that’s the first place I went. It doesn’t say anything about restrictions But on the forum several threads say the opposite, but they are 4 to 5 years old. I was hoping kind soul could confirm if it has restrictions or not rather than me calling up Rogers and asking. Thanks for having a look for me on the website.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,852

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Yeah. most of those posts in that time would have been when it first came out, and there was that restriction.

Maybe one of the MODS might be able to come by and confirm or not.