CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

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I'm a Senior Advisor
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CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

In a CBC article entitled "

Rogers' employees say managers turn a blind eye so call centre workers can lie and cheat customers"

http://www.cbc.ca/amp/1.4481128?__twitter_impression=true

Rogers' employees say managers turn a blind eye so call centre workers can lie and cheat customers

 

Rogers basic reply:

'We do not believe the concerns raised represent our values or sales practices,' Rogers says

 

So I say,lets hold them to the fire on this one and force them to live up to their standards of identifying our needs, living up to OADA, listening to our needs and not put undue pressure on their staff to push us to go forward with things we may not want when we have made it clear what we want.

 

 

This is a follow-up article on the expose of reports from the big blue customers.

 

I leave it for people to read - it is in early stages and who knows how it will fall out.

 

But I decided, as one of the people with a handicap - cognitive disability, print disabilities that impact my ability to follow printed material on Web sites and printed documents, my patience due to PTSD, and I am also aging and on fixed disability pension and will eventually be on fixed CPP and OAS with some pension when I turn sixty five.

 

That I would comment on strategies I use to protect my rights as an aging person and one with disabilities to be treated fairly and within the law.

 

1. AODO gives us many rights - the first is that CSR and customer relations staff must first ask "how may I help you".  Just so you are aware that is a legal requirement and we have a responsibility to indicate that we require accommodation and patience and clarity.  If we become confused, we can ask them to stop and repeat and if they are trying to push products and we have asked them to stop, we can advise them they are not listening to our stated needs and their need to meet our accommodations to not push our limits.

 

It may be necessary for those of us to be very clear before we start what we are after and keep them on task.  If you need a second person (my wife has my power of attourney for financial which I can invoke at any time and she takes over and listens in, or guides me.  She also takes notes and keeps me on task.

 

The CRTC has put out documents on how to effectively identify and present needs, which include what services you want, what you will pay, etc.

 

I wasn't surprised to see this article, and I have been through some of what has been described, and I have learned the hard way to ask a lot of questions and to be persistent on saying, "I am not interested in that, let's stick to what I asked for".

 

In general, I work well with Rogers in my interactions, but I run about 25% where I have to follow-up at length to clarify and fix miscommunication, and of my changes in the last 3 years, I have had to fix about 2/3 of them, most often one call, but as mentioned above, many have also required huge time and effort.  For me it has been my therapy on patience, assertiveness, and the infamous statement, based upon what I just hear, I am not sure you are remembering that I called in to reduce services, and desire services at a lower overall price, so why are you suggesting a plan and services that cost more when I said, I need to financially reduce my costs, even if that means reducing or elimating services.  Takes a lot persistence, and unfortunately, the last few years, as prices and plans change, value added services get lumped in, I have to continually start reducing my services and eliminating, and I really want to just get down to brass tacks and bite the bullet and see how I can reduce my services and costs and if Rogers can't do it, that is ok, I am old enough to live without the wide range of instant services available in our entertainment world, and by the way, is not just aging and disabilities, my daughters learned to value their money and not buy what they don't need and to recognize the sales pitch and most students in university these days have learned the value of money coming out of university.

 

So we have to stay strong when dealing with sales people from any company.  30% of the CSR commission on sales targets, and the Rogers response says 100% is performance based upon targets, so there is always a risk when a manager's commissions are dependent upon their employees, and the commission roles up that undue pressure may result as they try to earn a better income.

 

What is being described here is the Rogers I have known for the last few years, not the Rogers of older where I bought a product, nothing changed much, and prices went up with inflation, but so did my salary.  My salary no longer goes up but everything else does, so something has to go.

 

Thoughts.

 

Bruce

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

Hey @BS 

We were wondering why  they were making things so confusing in prepaid right now  ?   Therein lies your answer eh.? 

I thought it made more sense to standardize and simplify plans so there were less staff needed to field the questions  and solve problems .  It would seem to be part of the marketing strategy according to the  article.  

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

Just a few points I'll address here.

 

  • Not all sales roles are commissioned.
  • Rogers advisers are commissioned for sales of products and some upgrades. They were commissioned on wireless phone upgrades but that was discontinued, at least since I last worked there in 2015.
  • Managers are not commissioned for sales, but are under heavy scrutiny by upper management to ensure their team is performing or they are let go or transferred elsewhere.
  • There are third party agents contracted by Rogers who are not actual Rogers employees that account for around 60-70% of their call centre advisers. 
  • The allegations presented in the CBC article are accurate, however not widespread. It comes down to individual teams, some push sales harder than others. Front-line agents are put under enormous pressure to perform or will face consequences.

-Worked at Rogers 4 years in Customer Care

 

 

 

 

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

I wondered who was going to start discussing this article?  

rogers-employees-pressure-to-sell  Hello again Bruce.

 

Whether it is only one person or a company creed to behave in this way, it is quite shocking.  As a Rogers customer, the fact that I have not been sent anything about this accusation is also shocking.

I guess if management ignores it, they hope it will just go away.

 

We did get a "special offer" email from Rogers giving us an extra  6 GB for $105/mo which was strange.  $17.50 per Gig has to be a joke.  If we go over our data limit of 25GB, it is only $1.50 per Gig. If I go over 6GB it will cost 6x$1.50 =$9.00.  If you don't know what you are paying, you might think this is a deal, but it isn't.  

I don't get it unless it is just another kind of scam by Rogers.  Maybe a mod or RE can explain what the deal is.  

 

Strange Offer.png

 

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices


@User14 wrote:

I wondered who was going to start discussing this article?  

rogers-employees-pressure-to-sell  Hello again Bruce.

 

Whether it is only one person or a company creed to behave in this way, it is quite shocking.  As a Rogers customer, the fact that I have not been sent anything about this accusation is also shocking.

I guess if management ignores it, they hope it will just go away.

 

We did get a "special offer" email from Rogers giving us an extra  6 GB for $105/mo which was strange.  $17.50 per Gig has to be a joke.  If we go over our data limit of 25GB, it is only $1.50 per Gig. If I go over 6GB it will cost 6x$1.50 =$9.00.  If you don't know what you are paying, you might think this is a deal, but it isn't.  

I don't get it unless it is just another kind of scam by Rogers.  Maybe a mod or RE can explain what the deal is.  

 

Strange Offer.png

 


I should have also added that if this "deal just for me" is for our cellular plan, it is $15.00/GB if we go over the 2GB 4G/LTE limit on our phones. 6GB would only be $90, not $105.  I would be interested in an explanation of this deal that is "just for me".

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

 

@User14  Yes that would be me.  Smiley LOL  I agree fully with you - even one person who has this happen is one too many, and it appears that there is enough of it to justify CBC to put it out there for consideration.

 

I have personally seen many of those same offers - usually in my calls in to review my services, where the offer is more money for something I don't need.

 

In your example of what 6 GB would cost you if you just pay overages, the bigger question when I look at that is, how often would you ever do that level of overage in a month anyway - if rarely, not only do you pay more in a month for the offer, you keep paying for it through the whole offer period.

 

I constantly have to listen to the sales pitch of, "we have a great data offer with a share anything plan, when I was on a family plan (old design share everything - shared phone minutes when 4 of us never reached the 300 minutes), monitored our long distance and text usage and no data ever.  Now we are on two individual plans, one with 500 mb data, the other with none, and we got new phones too, but when phone is paid for, or balance of savings to cost of paying off the phone is in my favour, I am going pay as you go because I barely ever use my phone for text or calls.  There is nothing in any share anything offer that is of benefit to the two of us - for years, I have had a note a the top of my account, put there by the office of the president - do not solicit to this customer unless they ask you to.  It is still there and I have to remind them often.

 

So I hear these offers for share everything and buckets of data all the time and how they have so much value added features, when I still use my phone as basically a pay as you go emergency phone.  We combined our phones years ago to family plan because we could call each other anywhere in Canada for free, and had small text packages for those who used them.  We have always been part o the group on the exceptions to the targeted market, but like the people screaming over the changes in pay as you go - we have carefully defined services that are priced and picked to perfectly fit our current needs, and when I call in for a small change to my needs, I want to discuss those needs, not the current marketed plan - If I wanted that I would have seen it on the web site or on the TV, and I would be asking for it.

 

I put these stories out there for these discussions, so that consumers can be smart about their purchases and needs and not get caught into the latest hype.

 

I am glad that it gets some discussion from those like me who really don't have that much money in the first, are not into the newest thing and just want to meet my real needs (and let's be honest, my cell phone beyond an emergency phone is not a need, it is a want or a desire).  So articles like these are important initiatives from CBC and others to guide us to be aware of how corporations are working to get us to purchase their services - from my perspective, the customer comes first, because that is who I am and by being educated on the strategies being used to sell to me, I can make smart and educated  decisions on meeting my consumer needs and my budget.

 

Glad to see discussion on this one.

 

Bruce

 

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices


@BS wrote:

 


Glad to see discussion on this one.

 

Bruce

 


I do feel sorry for the Rogers employees caught in this situation. As individuals they can't fight management.  The CEO and the Board of Directors set the policies or rules and they are accountable for the enforcement as well. In the military it is called Doctrine and in Business it is called Code of Conduct.  A lot of terms from the military are used in business: Rules of Engagement, Soldier's Creed, Military Ethos, etc.  In a chain-of-command or employer-employee relationship it is the officer who is accountable for the subordinates work and behaviour.  Therefore as with Lac Megantic, a train engineer who follows the rules of engagement or policies set by management is not culpable unless it is incompetence.  Management is responsible!  Poor communication, poor supervision, poor training, etc. are the cause.  It seems accountability is something that managers in the business sector do not want to talk about.  A soldier has a duty to disobey any unlawful order and so does an employee of a company like Rogers in my view.  I guess some have and they shoud be congratulated.

 

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

Interesting analogy - I grew up in a military family and served for a period as well.

 

Other phrases are the orders of the day, standard orders, which facilitated common communications - big business didn't think about that one in general in their day to day operations.

 

The other thing that existed in the military where big business has tried to exemplify is "the buck stops here", accountability originates at the top etc.

 

In the military, we were taught the phrases - "may I speak freely", and all officers respected that request.  If you were in the middle of a mission on a battle field, of course, the answer can be not now, we have to move forward.  Others are "with all due respect, I disagree" - and officer of senior staff had to listen.  didn't mean they had to follow it, but they did have to listen and express an opinion on it and make a decision. And the last one was, "let's walk together" which meant, let's talk freely in private away  from everyone.

 

So I too feel sorry for the staff, because the companies are often top down authority driven, and if you don't like it, leave.  Whereas in the military, if you refused the order under reasonable conditions that it could be considered after due consideration and discussion, you were just transferred.

 

But these were skills that were trained into us in that it was recognized that senior decision makers can make mistakes, and in the military, lives are on the line and yes, you have to be respect, but respect is earned and lost and hard to earn back.

 

That is where I am as a customer, respect for Rogers was earned and I was loyal as a result, then over time, that trust has been lost, and it still has no been earned back as of yet, but I do acknowledge when someone does something well.

 

I wonder if staff are able to speak with all due respect to meet the new expectation of the end to end customer experience, and which takes priority, sales targets, or the customer experience.  From the information from "whistle blowers", there are a reasonable number who I suspect don't feel respected and given the opportunity to earn respect from the customer.

 

But I will close by saying that I have had some really good interactions, in al my years, but not as frequent in the last few years - it is improving which is good, but it hasn't overcome the loss of trust and respect that was lost over those later years.

 

So things have changed, and I take it one contract at a time, and carefully decide whether the offer in  front of me is worth my limited budget.

 

Bruce

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Re: CBC article on Rogers CSR and management practices

had ignite installed in june because i was told my current system was being phased out and to keep it would cost more then the new ignite to keep it. There was never any mention about about setup fees or any of the services that would be discontinued like tv call display. I am still having problems with outages after hours and hours of being on the phone and waiting for techs. Have been a customer for over30 years and they say they cant give a credit until the problem is resolved which i dont see anytime soon. Why cant they credit you on your monthly bill which makes sense to me. I seemed to have found the answer to some of these by simply googling "ROGERS COMPLAINTS" also found this news report https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/rogers-employees-pressure-to-sell-1.4481128