about W35 IP

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

about W35 IP

Hey all,

 

Another weird thing I stumbled upon is that the IP address shown on the W35 web interface is 25.xxx.xxx.xxx

 

And according to ARIN, the entire 25. block was further assigned to RIPE

 

http://whois.arin.net/rest/net/NET-25-0-0-0-1 

 

And according to RIPE, this block is owned by UK Ministry of Defence...

 

https://apps.db.ripe.net/whois/lookup/ripe/inetnum/25.0.0.0-25.255.255.255.html

 

What gives?!?

 

cheers

 

 

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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 842

Re: about W35 IP

@leGeddy:

 

yeah, OK.  But inside your "own" network, you can basically do whatever addressing you want.  All of those IPv4 address space assignments are valid and meaningful only on the "public" Internet at large.

 

The whole matter of IP v4 addressing ran out of steam about a decade ago.  It is only now that IP v6 is possibly being implemented widely.  For more information on IP addressing and "private IP addresses" see:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

 

There were actually some efforts made way back then to address the private IP address space issue.

 

Think about it.  Within your own IP network, you can assign whatever addresses you want to whatever you need.  Rogers, as well as lots of others, I would think, have been creative in their use of the available IP v4 addresses.  All of those IANA address space assignments are meaningful only on the Internet at large.

 

The move to IP v6 is intended to resolve that kind of an issue.  In the meantime, it looks confusing to us who are not privy to the internal addressing plans for Rogers, in our case, or any other large network for that matter.

 

skinorth

 

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Highlighted
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 842

Re: about W35 IP

@leGeddy:

 

yeah, OK.  But inside your "own" network, you can basically do whatever addressing you want.  All of those IPv4 address space assignments are valid and meaningful only on the "public" Internet at large.

 

The whole matter of IP v4 addressing ran out of steam about a decade ago.  It is only now that IP v6 is possibly being implemented widely.  For more information on IP addressing and "private IP addresses" see:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Private_network

 

There were actually some efforts made way back then to address the private IP address space issue.

 

Think about it.  Within your own IP network, you can assign whatever addresses you want to whatever you need.  Rogers, as well as lots of others, I would think, have been creative in their use of the available IP v4 addresses.  All of those IANA address space assignments are meaningful only on the Internet at large.

 

The move to IP v6 is intended to resolve that kind of an issue.  In the meantime, it looks confusing to us who are not privy to the internal addressing plans for Rogers, in our case, or any other large network for that matter.

 

skinorth

 

View solution in original post

Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: about W35 IP

Ah thanks for the explanation skinorth! I lost track of the fact that it was an internal address. But what is its purpose then?

cheers
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 842

Re: about W35 IP

@leGeddy:

 

please let me point out that my "explanation" was based on speculation on my part.

 

But, as a result of the IP v4 address space exhaustion (widely identified as an issue more than a decade ago) lots of techniques were developed to compensate.  Address translation techniques are being used by everyone now.  Most, if not all of us, use the 192.168.xxx.yyy addressing, for example.

 

And, if you can use address translation at the entry portal to your "private" network, then why could you not use it internally in cascaded fashion within your network as well for whatever reason?  A large corporate or carrier's network, such as Rogers can use whatever addressing internally, as long as the basic technical rules and conventions of IP v4 addressing are followed.

 

That does not necessarily make it any easier for us on the outside to understand the network structure or addressing plan.  But many would hold that that is a requirement for good security.  Quite often the first step to hacking into, or attacking network infrastructure is to understand its internal structure.  The addressing plan and address allocation is an integral part of that understanding.

 

We (for the most part, I hope!) are not trying to attack the network.  We are trying to understand it to repair problems or improve performance.  TCP/IP networks were designed from the beginning to allow this through both its open nature, and its relative simplicity.  That's how we got a number of "S" protocols: SNMP, SMTP, etc.  But it is that same openness and simplicity that has at least indirectly created the opportunity for many security problems, as well as spam.

 

The flip side of the coin is that if we as network users cannot adequately access network information to diagnose and troubleshoot problems, it must then (and rightly so!) be Roger's responsibility.  That is what we pay for every month.

 

skinorth

 

Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: about W35 IP

@skinorth:

 

For what it's worth, your explanation makes sense... although I still fail to see the real purpose of this IP. And of course, I am not trying to hack the system 😉

 

I am simply trying to understand why I don't get the service I am paying for. And you yourself know from experience that taking this kind of matter to Rogers tech support is a futile exercise... I just read your post on Vista's DHCP issue and it proves their incompetence.

 

cheers