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X1 IPTV service

536
I Plan to Stick Around

Last year Rogers announced that it will be using the American IPTV platform X1.  Does this affect any of the current cable television customers?  Will current customers automatically be updated to this new platform or will this be in addition to the current cable service?

 

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292 REPLIES 292

Re: X1 IPTV service

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Eh, i got used to it.
But I also have used it since it FIRST came out.. like, oh gosh, might have been 20 years ago? 
Thats how old the first remote was >.>



Re: X1 IPTV service

pvanb
I Plan to Stick Around

For any of the early adopters here: does the new modem provide a way to add static routes?

Re: X1 IPTV service

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

I am not able to SSH into it, at least with my tests.



Re: X1 IPTV service

pvanb
I Plan to Stick Around
So presumably there’s nothing in the UI either then?

Re: X1 IPTV service

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Nope.
Just the normal forwarding, port triggering, etc.



Re: X1 IPTV service

Kyrawoudstra
I've Been Around

Hey, quick question for those who have gotten the IPTV service.

 

I had it installed this morning, and they do need to some back to fix something related to our alarm system and install a MESH and fix the connection to the alarm, but I am finding when I change channels the following happens--the logo of the channels appears and there are three dots in the middle of the screen, with the dots cycling for about 2 seconds or so, then the channel comes up, but it is blurry and it takes another 4-5 seconds until it snaps into clarity. When speaking to Ignite tech support, he was saying he tried it in the office and it did take about 7 seconds for the picture to be really clear, and that this was part of having internet TV. I must admit that if I knew this would happen, not sure I would have switched.  As I mentioned they are installing a MESH tomorrow morning, but this TV is only about 12-13 feet from the modem, so wouldn't think it would be needed for this one. 

 

I would appreciate hearing if anyone else is having this issue, and will update the board tomorrow if it improves after they put the MESH in.

 

Thanks.

Re: X1 IPTV service

More than likely the tech will move the modem so that is close enough to the existing alarm system phone plug and then install a mesh network router or remote device somewhere else in the home so that you end up with adequate wifi service throughout the home.  

 

Or, do you happen to have a phone port on a wallplate that is fairly close the modem's current location.  If so, the modem can stay where it is and it can connect to the house phone system at that point.  From there its just a matter of bridging the alarm system into the house phone system.  That shouldn't be terribly difficult to do. 



Re: X1 IPTV service

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

oh very true no one really mentioned it but it is the same as non ignite if u were to have the existing rogers home phone modem the same would apply. your modem would need to be located near your d-marc to utilize the seizure if you are paying for alarm monitoring over the phone lines or another thing you can do is move the RJ31X jack elsewhere in your house, this is more complex and costly but CAN be achieved and will work.   this only applies if you have an alarm system and are monitoring it via the traditional phone lines if you monitor your alarm system thru the internet or wireless cellular then this does not apply to you.



Re: X1 IPTV service


@Kyrawoudstra wrote:

Hey, quick question for those who have gotten the IPTV service.

 

I had it installed this morning, and they do need to some back to fix something related to our alarm system and install a MESH and fix the connection to the alarm, but I am finding when I change channels the following happens--the logo of the channels appears and there are three dots in the middle of the screen, with the dots cycling for about 2 seconds or so, then the channel comes up, but it is blurry and it takes another 4-5 seconds until it snaps into clarity. When speaking to Ignite tech support, he was saying he tried it in the office and it did take about 7 seconds for the picture to be really clear, and that this was part of having internet TV. I must admit that if I knew this would happen, not sure I would have switched.  As I mentioned they are installing a MESH tomorrow morning, but this TV is only about 12-13 feet from the modem, so wouldn't think it would be needed for this one. 

 

I would appreciate hearing if anyone else is having this issue, and will update the board tomorrow if it improves after they put the MESH in.

 

Thanks.


 

The clear up, may be a side effect of a FULL IPTV based service.
(Bell doesnt have it with theirs, i THINK? But theirs is a little different too, as the main box is still doing the tuning, etc.. perhaps helps eliminate the issue)

Compare it to say Netflix (if you have ever used it).  It does the exact same thing.  It starts off at a lower bandwidth, then ramps up assuming its available, and the picture goes into the better quality you can get with the the faster speed.

Mine doesnt seem to take quite that long.. but there is a few seconds most of the time.  But I do have the mesh installed.  A better signal, should help with it establishing the faster speed quicker I would think.

This may be a bit of a mixed blessing for say issues with bad internet times.. which will allow it to still watch, at a lower quality.. other then buffering?



Re: X1 IPTV service

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Food for thought.  Have a look at the following diagram:

 

https://help.brinkshome.com/hc/en-us/articles/225669707-RJ31X-jack-wiring-diagram-for-line-seizure

 

If that RJ31X jack is already installed and connected to the phone system, then it might just be a matter of connecting the alarms systems connector, if it happens to be an RJ-11.  When the Rogers tech installed our home phone modem years ago, he installed an RJ31X which was connected to the home's 66 block, and then simply connected the phone modem to the RJ31X using a short telephone cable.  Very simple.  If the same situation exists here, with that RJ31X and possibly an RJ-11 connector on the alarm system phone cable, then those two can be connected.  The only remaining question is whether or not there is a phone port on a wallplate that is close to where the modem currently sits.  If so, complete the connection and that should work. 

 

It might be possible to avoid moving the modem and installing the mesh network as well. 



Re: X1 IPTV service

Sundog1966
I Plan to Stick Around

Up is down and down is up. Down arrow leads to higher upper channels and the up arrow leads to lower channels. Makes perfect non-sense to me!

Re: X1 IPTV service

57
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

@Sundog1966 wrote:

Up is down and down is up. Down arrow leads to higher upper channels and the up arrow leads to lower channels. Makes perfect non-sense to me!


Since it's the way the guide is laid out, it does make perfect sense.    Most people don't channel surf any more, it's way too slow, so use the guide or record your programmes.  If you want to go up a channel, use the channel button to go up or down



Re: X1 IPTV service

SimplePanda
I Plan to Stick Around

@Gdkitty wrote:

The clear up, may be a side effect of a FULL IPTV based service.
(Bell doesnt have it with theirs, i THINK? But theirs is a little different too, as the main box is still doing the tuning, etc.. perhaps helps eliminate the issue)

Compare it to say Netflix (if you have ever used it).  It does the exact same thing.  It starts off at a lower bandwidth, then ramps up assuming its available, and the picture goes into the better quality you can get with the the faster speed.


Bell's service doesn't do this if you are watching on an actual hardware receiver issued by Bell. Full-freight Fibe TV works using a fixed rate UDP stream delivered over multicast IP. It has no picture quality variability; you're either watching the stream or you're not, and as soon as a channel is tuned you're watching full quality television. 

 

Alternatively, if you are watching FibeTV on an Apple TV / Android TV / Smartphone / Tablet, rather than using multicast IPTV you are watching via HLS (HTTP Live Streaming). This works similarly to Netflix and as a result it can start at a lower quality to quickly start the stream, then cycle up to higher quality as connection stability is observed. This is also done to support watching on mobile networks where connectivity can be variable.

 

In practice it's pretty quick when watching on a real Bell internet connection via Wifi; you're basically watching full quality TV immediately in my experience.

 

I'm not sure if Ignite TV / X1 is deployed to the actual Ignite TV receivers using the first method (multicast IP streaming) or the second (HLS) when running in full-IP mode (a la Ignite TV). It would be interesting to know more if someone has specifics.

 

It reads like Rogers is using HLS for all TV delivery though, which is interesting. 

Re: X1 IPTV service

andrew9446
I Plan to Stick Around

Now, my question is, can Bell Fibe PQ drop to a lower quality if Network Issues arise, without totally losing the stream altogether?? It seems Ignite can adapt itself depending on network quality without losing a watchable picture. 

Re: X1 IPTV service

SimplePanda
I Plan to Stick Around

@andrew9446 wrote:

Now, my question is, can Bell Fibe PQ drop to a lower quality if Network Issues arise, without totally losing the stream altogether?? It seems Ignite can adapt itself depending on network quality without losing a watchable picture. 


Fibe TV to a receiver doesn't do this but network issues don't really exist there (at least in general practice). The FibeTV stream is received regardless of what is happening on the internet connectivity side as FibeTV is delivered over a dedicated, private VLAN which is given priority on the service side. You could completely saturate your internet connection and FibeTV would still work fine.

 

The only thing that would really disrupt a Fibe TV stream is physical connectivity issues (DSL problems if you're on FTTN).

 

All bets are off if you're streaming wirelessly of course, though in my experience a wireless Bell receiver tends to be reasonably stable as long as you have decent signal strength.

 

FibeTV to devices (Apple TV, tablet, phone) will drop to lower quality if it has to (wireless congestion, etc).

Re: X1 IPTV service

ablatt
I Plan to Stick Around

Sorry if this is a silly question, but if IPTV is totally IP-based, why couldn't they deliver it with the CODA?  What does the XB6 do that it can't? 

Re: X1 IPTV service


@ablatt wrote:

Sorry if this is a silly question, but if IPTV is totally IP-based, why couldn't they deliver it with the CODA?  What does the XB6 do that it can't? 


Well, it does the home phone, at least...

 

... but fundamentally, there is a huge shift in the backend to the 'Comcast' back end systems. The XB6 is set up in those new back end systems, while the older modems are not. Could they have made the older modems work? Perhaps, but I think one benefit of this switch is that it will wildly simply the hardware that is in the field, at least at first - one modem, one TV box, and that's basically it, compared to the however many modems, STBs, voice modems, etc that they support now.

 

IIRC, in Shawland, they replace modems with 'identical' modems when you sign up for Blue Sky, but the new modems are set up in the correct Comcastic backend systems.

Re: X1 IPTV service

SimplePanda
I Plan to Stick Around

@ablatt wrote:

Sorry if this is a silly question, but if IPTV is totally IP-based, why couldn't they deliver it with the CODA?  What does the XB6 do that it can't? 


The XB6 has a telephone EMTA integrated into it.

 

But beyond that, there's no technical reason. It's likely just due to the provisioning system Rogers deployed for Ignite TV.


That said, you probably would rather have an XB6 than a CODA anyways, or better still, wait for the "other" XB6 to enter circulation (there is a second identical looking XB6 modem in testing that uses a better chipset than the Intel/Puma chipset that is shared between the current XB6 and the CODA). 

 

OTOH, Rogers may never release the "other" XB6 units or if they do, they may provide no clear means of "upgrading" to it if you already have an Intel based XB6. Anyones guess.

Re: X1 IPTV service

The XB6 that Rogers is currently installing is the Arris version which has an Intel Puma 7 Chipset.  That chipset is also used in the Hitron CODA-4582.  I suspect that Hitron is much further ahead in terms of dealing with the Puma 7 idiosyncrasies, compared to Arris, simply due to the fact that the Hitron modem was out before the Arris version.  Hitron has also been very active in releasing updates to correct various problems as well.  

 

https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Arris_TG3482ER

 

Apparently, the Techicolour XB6 is out for employee testing.  This uses the Broadcom BCM-3390 chipset which should result in a much better modem when compared to the Intel Puma 7, simply due to the overall design.

 

https://wikidevi.com/wiki/Technicolor_CGM4140COM

 



Re: X1 IPTV service

Sundog1966
I Plan to Stick Around

I wonder if we can install linux Mint on it. Then all we need is Kodi or plex! LOL.