Wireless Routers and dropped connections

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xplornetsucks
I'm a Trusted Enthusiast
Posts: 225

Wireless Routers and dropped connections

Please all REMEMBER many wireless things work on the same frequency as your wireless routers, 2.4 GHZ phones, baby monitors etc etc..to reduce the postings please make sure you dont have an issue with another wireless device such as items mentioned above. Not sure? Spread the distance of all wireless base stations apart from your router... cordless phone.. turn it on and see if your computer disconnects... there are many wireless items in your house that run  or can interfere with the 2.4 network....google it and see what may make a difference

 

OH and ONE MAJOR issue... is your new HYDRO smart meter... move your router as far away as possible... it uses up ALL bands/and is unregulated... nasty device as is, but could provide internet to all of Ontario...( you dont think seeing your energy usage online is done by magic do you?)

 

 

***edited labels***

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,951

Re: Wireless Routers and dropped connections

@xplornetsucks, 

 

One thing you can do is change the channel easily of your wireless router to one that is unused or has the least interference.   This is something people forget to do and typically leave their router on the defaut channel.   Another thing to note the Hydro Smart meter, although some of them operate at 2.4 Ghz, they use channels 11 to 26, which is well beyond the range of Wi-Fi.  Just a fyi, Wi-Fi goes up to channel 11, so they do not overlap.  Also depending on your Hydro company, some Hydro meters operate at 900 mhz, which shouldn't affect the 2.4 Ghz band at all. 

 

So my recommendation is to use a diagnostics program in your computer/laptop and scan to see which channels are available or the least congested, and then set your router to use this channel. I did this and noticed a 80% improvement and my area is saturated with all kinds of wifis and such



skinorth
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 842

Re: Wireless Routers and dropped connections

@xplornetsucks and Pauly:

 

I have just learned something new from you both.  Thanks.  I was not aware of Hydro smart meters doing this.

 

OK, so Pauly mentions that the Hydro meters use channels above 11, and should not interfere with 2.4 GHz WiFi.  But that is as long as they are working correctly.  I really do not wish to raise any paranoia's, but we all know that technology can fail, so this is just another potential problem area to keep in mind when analyzing a WiFi issue.  All the more reason to do use wired ethernet connections for general troubleshooting until it is established that things are working properly..

 

@Pauly:

 

I agree that it is easy to change the channel used by your WiFi router.  But most people won't know this, or think of doing the analysis of interference.

 

Good suggestions and something to keep in mind.

 

skinorth

 

xplornetsucks
I'm a Trusted Enthusiast
Posts: 225

Re: Wireless Routers and dropped connections

Honestly my First smart meter... installed and during hydro ones testing Rang a 900mhz phone not plugged into telephone just charging... they replaced that smart meter with a 2.4 meter... my LCD TV changes channels when it sends out signals!!

 

My Forum name... xplornetsucks is for a reason.. xplornet uses 2.4 and 900  receivers to send out internet connections... guess who created a new network which interferes with the motorolla canopy systems....

skinorth
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 842

Re: Wireless Routers and dropped connections; things that go "thump" in the night

 

 

@all:

 

Radio Frequency interference is and will be a growing problem for all of us as we and everyone around us use more and more wireless devices.  I remember that when cordless phones first came out, they were a lot simpler implementations than todays cordless phones.  Back then, I believe they used 900 MHz frequencies, and did not use encryption or scrambling.  This meant that if you lived in a heavily populated area, for example, a large apartment building, you might get other people's cordless phones interfering with, and connecting to, your base station.  Or you could connect to someone else's base system and phone line in a nearby apartment.

 

Today, the devices we use also have their own issues.  For example, I have noticed that my RocketHub caused interference with the sound on a TV I own when we take it to our trailer at the lake.  Every so often, maybe once a minute or so, there is a distinct, rapid "thump-thump-thump-thump" noise coming out of the speakers on the TV.  The TV is actually turned off at that time.  The RocketHub is maybe 5 - 6 feet away from the TV.

 

At home, the RocketHub makes has a similar effect on the subwoofer for my home theatre system.  The subwoofer, which turns on automatically when it "senses" an audio signal coming from the AV system, stays turned on, and every minute or so, there will be the same rapid "thump-thump-thump-thump" noise coming from the subwoofer as I heard from theTV at the trailer.  This does not happen if the RocketHub is turned off or removed from my home.  The cable between the AV receiver and the subwoofer is about 20 feet long, and pass right below where the RocketHub is located.  As well, the RocketHub draws its AC power from the same circuit as the subwoofer.

 

So, is this a serious issue?  Not really, but it is annoying, and it also needlessly uses up some small amount of electric power, because normally the subwoofer would automatically turn itself off, and it would stay of until I used the AV system.

 

Further I refer you to the following URL which contains a copy of a report" The Effects of Interference on
General WLAN Traffic", on WiFi performance when interference from various sources is present:

 

http://media.techtarget.com/searchNetworking/downloads/Effects_of_Interference_on_General_WLAN_Traff...

 

Here is a quote from the summary of the report:

 

"We found that some common wireless devices could severely degrade the performance of a
wireless LAN. For example, we saw throughput reductions of more than 62% caused by a microwave
oven, 89% from another wireless LAN, and almost 20% from a Bluetooth headset.
We also saw the complete obliteration (100% degradation) of a Wi-Fi link caused by a cordless
phone. While not all of the devices tested resulted in reduced throughput, we verified that
the threat from both Wi-Fi and non-Wi-Fi devices is real."

 

So as mentioned previously in this thread, and as the above-mentioned report points out, the undoubted benefits of wireless devices also bring with them potential problems which are difficult to understand and appreciate, as we cannot see or feel that wireless energy that flows from and between these devices.

 

Keep this in mind when you encounter problems with your wireless devices.

 

skinorth