Slow upload speeds and connection drops

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Slow upload speeds and connection drops

My internet connection has been fluctuating a lot over the last 3-4 weeks. When it first began, it would lose the connection, disconnecting anything you had running (online game, video stream). I checked all devices, all were effected, but this disconnection was so quick I didn't realize it was the internet at first. The modem didn't show any signs of losing signal.

 

And as nothing has changed since I subscribed to Rogers, I can't see it being any other hardware. I checked my router and its logs, reconfigured it, checked Windows network reports, reset the modem, reconfigured it, swapped cables... I really did go through it all as I am fairly savvy with this sort of stuff. I also did a many speed tests via Rogers Speed Test and my down and up speeds were like being on dialup, most of the time timing out (losing the connection).

 

I then did speak with technical support, we went through most of everything I had already done, they checked the signals on the modem and noticed there was some low figures and a technician was arranged to come check things out. Between other things that happened and the problem disappearing overnight, I cancelled the appointment and had since been running at full speeds since. But now I'm back to where I was and the problem isn't my connectivity but my upload speeds and ping times to servers now. Using the Rogers Speed Test and other tools, my down speed is phenominal, it's my upload that is causing me issues now. Sometimes it shows I am uploading at full and others I'm bottoming out at 0.20Mbps or timing out.

 

I connected directly to the modem to see if there would be a change but it did not improve anything. While I did that, I grabbed some of the info off the modem which I'll put at the bottom here.

 

My setup is:

 

Cisco DPC3825, which is connected to my D-Link DIR-655 router (the modem is bridged though I ran it in DHCP for months and it was perfectly fine then). Wireless, WPS and all the unnecessary is disabled on the modem, the router is configured as it always has been (again I did try factory settings, no solution), as far as security: maxed out, it's nothing from an unknown device which I went over with billing on a separate note for an overage. Tried it with only my desktop connected (LAN), no difference.

 

Doing ping tests to different servers and sites, some are showing normal values and others are showing longer times (where normally ping time is 40ish and now it's 120+). Trace routes are showing many timeouts when I test to some of my most vistited servers and sites. I thought maybe it was a cross-border problem in the lines, but either way it keeps taking the same route and then either shows a very high latency or times out within the first twelve hops.

 

I'm just curious if there may be issues in the area and maybe I should have a tech come out and check the lines? I really can't see it being my setup as nothing has changed. It's sporadic and will go away and then happen again. 

 

DOC SIS WAN

 

Model: Cisco DPC3825

Hardware revision: 1.0

Bootloader revision: 2.3.0_R3

Current software revision: dpc3825-v302r125572-131113a-ROG

Firmware name: dpc3825-v302r125572-131113a-ROG.bin

 

DOCSIS downstream scanning:   Completed

DOCSIS ranging:                             Completed

DOCSIS DHCP:                               Completed

DOCSIS TFTP:                                 Completed

DOCSIS data reg complete:          Completed

DOCSIS privacy:                              Enabled

 

Downstream Channels

Channel 1:   -10.4dBmV      32.9dB

Channel 2:   -8.9dBmV        32.4dB

Channel 3:   -8.7dBmV        31.4dB

Channel 4:   -11.5dBmV      33.3dB

Channel 5:   -11.9dBmV      33.9dB

Channel 6:   -11.3dbmV      33.0dB

Channel 7:   -11.7dBmV      31.7dB

Channel 8:   -12.1dBmV      32.4dB

 

Upstream Channels

Channel 1:   0.0 dBmV

Channel 2:   50.9dBmV      -these seem high?

Channel 3:   50.9dBmV      -these seem high?

Channel 4:   0.0dBmV

 

The downstream seems acceptable though I'm not familiar with what is normal. The upstream seems to be too high and is where the issue lies, though my upstream shouldn't cause a triple latency on say gaming servers should it? I thought they would measure by download rate?

Here's a link to a screenshot of the DOC SIS log, showing a few critical events? http://i59.tinypic.com/1sf404.png

Not sure if normal or not. Anyway, thank you all for checking this out and for any input, I'm hopeful to resolve this soon.

 

Edit: Forgot to add that I am on Rogers 500Gb Extreme service that was bundled with phone and television for $99/month.

 

 

***edited labels***

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Resident Expert
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Posts: 6,944

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

You need a tech to check the cabling and its connectors.  Your downstream levels are very low and you only have two upstream channels instead of three. That normally translates to a cable / connector issue.  The downsteam levels should be at 0 dBmV with a signal to noise ratio of 36 to 40 dB.  The range is 0dBmV + / - 15 dBmV.  The upstream channels (there should be three) should normally be in the 36 to 40 dBmV range.  The max upper level is 51 dBmV.

 

There are three versions of the DIR-655.  Of the three versions, only the version certified last year by the Wifi Alliance will run mixed 20 / 40 MHz wide devices in the 2.4 GHz band.  The previous two are not mixed environment friendly, same as the CGN3.  The CGN3 will lock down to 20 MHz wide channels if there is a 20 MHz only device in the network.  I expect the same for the previous versions of the DIR-655.  As a result, you would notice a slow down in data rates if that was occuring.  By checking the models of the wifi mini-cards in the laptops for example, one can determine what to expect when they are in the network.  From there it becomes a matter of choice in possibly upgrading the mini-cards to one that provide better service.

 

 

I'm not sure what you have now for connected channel width, 20Mhz or 40Mhz, so that can make a difference.  I would need to know the connection rate to see what its doing.  If you open the Netwok and sharing Center and select the connection link in the middle of the page right handside it will take you to the connection panel which shows the connected rate with the CGN3.  That connected rate can be used to quickly determine if the laptop is using a 20 or 40 Mhz wide channel.  If you select the link for my user name that will take you to my public page with 3 jpgs.  One is the 802.11 Modulation Coding Scheme which shows the various combinations of numbers of antennas (streams) and bandwidths and guard times.  By looking at that chart and matching the connected data rate, normally you determine what channel width and guard times are in use as most but not all are very specific. There are a few cases where you have to be carefull as its possible to obtain the same data rate with 20 or 40 MHz wide channels.

 

Edit:  Normally there are three upstream channels running.  The Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS) and modem communicate during short maintenance intervales to set the upstream signal levels.  When the cable or connectors deteriorate, the upstream signal levels will move up, as the modem attempts to maintain three upstream channels.  As there is a limit to the maximum power output by the modem, at some point when three channels can't be maintained as it would take too much power, the modem drops one channel out.  If the cable  / connector deterioration becomes worse, you can end up with one upstream channel running.  In both cases, with one or two channels dropped out, you will notice a slow down as the modem doesn't have the same bandwidth to use for its acknowledgements of data packet arrivals.  When you're at that point, its time for a tech visit.



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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,944

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

You need a tech to check the cabling and its connectors.  Your downstream levels are very low and you only have two upstream channels instead of three. That normally translates to a cable / connector issue.  The downsteam levels should be at 0 dBmV with a signal to noise ratio of 36 to 40 dB.  The range is 0dBmV + / - 15 dBmV.  The upstream channels (there should be three) should normally be in the 36 to 40 dBmV range.  The max upper level is 51 dBmV.

 

There are three versions of the DIR-655.  Of the three versions, only the version certified last year by the Wifi Alliance will run mixed 20 / 40 MHz wide devices in the 2.4 GHz band.  The previous two are not mixed environment friendly, same as the CGN3.  The CGN3 will lock down to 20 MHz wide channels if there is a 20 MHz only device in the network.  I expect the same for the previous versions of the DIR-655.  As a result, you would notice a slow down in data rates if that was occuring.  By checking the models of the wifi mini-cards in the laptops for example, one can determine what to expect when they are in the network.  From there it becomes a matter of choice in possibly upgrading the mini-cards to one that provide better service.

 

 

I'm not sure what you have now for connected channel width, 20Mhz or 40Mhz, so that can make a difference.  I would need to know the connection rate to see what its doing.  If you open the Netwok and sharing Center and select the connection link in the middle of the page right handside it will take you to the connection panel which shows the connected rate with the CGN3.  That connected rate can be used to quickly determine if the laptop is using a 20 or 40 Mhz wide channel.  If you select the link for my user name that will take you to my public page with 3 jpgs.  One is the 802.11 Modulation Coding Scheme which shows the various combinations of numbers of antennas (streams) and bandwidths and guard times.  By looking at that chart and matching the connected data rate, normally you determine what channel width and guard times are in use as most but not all are very specific. There are a few cases where you have to be carefull as its possible to obtain the same data rate with 20 or 40 MHz wide channels.

 

Edit:  Normally there are three upstream channels running.  The Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS) and modem communicate during short maintenance intervales to set the upstream signal levels.  When the cable or connectors deteriorate, the upstream signal levels will move up, as the modem attempts to maintain three upstream channels.  As there is a limit to the maximum power output by the modem, at some point when three channels can't be maintained as it would take too much power, the modem drops one channel out.  If the cable  / connector deterioration becomes worse, you can end up with one upstream channel running.  In both cases, with one or two channels dropped out, you will notice a slow down as the modem doesn't have the same bandwidth to use for its acknowledgements of data packet arrivals.  When you're at that point, its time for a tech visit.



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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 8

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

Some progress was made early this morning. I decided to start from scratch again and moved the modem to different connection points in my home with some favorable results, with downstreams closer to 1-3dBmV but the upstreams only went down to 45dBmV but on three channels instead of only two. Thank you for pointing that out Datalink.

 

Strange though, even with the improved values, my ping times and trace routes are still showing the same results, but only from my desktop. When I do the same tests from the laptop (both wired - I don't use wireless when testing, too many variables) the results were normal. So I don't know where, how or why my desktop is the only device with the issue as it wasn't before.

 

So to delve deeper into it, I disabled my NIC and tried my wireless (desktop has both) and again, same negative results. Did the same with the laptop, better results though it is not Gigabit and the wireless is 'wireless' so I don't take much into account when compared to my desktop. But we'll consider them acceptable/normal.

 

Another test I did was ping'd all the same servers and sites directly from my router (DIR-655) and they all came back nominal, similar timings as the laptop showed when connected via CAT5. So this is narrowing down to my desktop although I still see poor results on the modem's signal. I have since moved it back to how I had it originally and the downstream values increased slightly to about 9-10dBmV and of course the upstream values skyrocketed to 51dBmV, but on three channels this time. As far as transfer speeds, I'm right where I should be at with 30Mbps down and 10Mbps up as the speed tests report with excellent latency.

 

My next steps are to recycle the drivers and then maybe try an additional NIC but I don't think that's it. I can't see both NIC and WiFi acting up at the very same time as they are separate devices and separate drivers. But you never know.

 

I don't really think a tech is going to solve this issue, but there still may be an issue in the main line or lines in the house causing the low signal and noise. That is something I cannot test as I don't have the tools and my leads won't reach. I'm also heading to where the main comes in and checking the splitter there (I live in an up/down duplex so I can't go ripping through stuff lol). So many factors, could even be EMI from all the wiring around my desk (though that should have corrected when I moved it away) and even this house kills WiFi outside for some reason. I'll check back in a couple days and in no success, call a tech in but would hate to see a bill for that.

 

Thanks again Datalink.

 

Update: I don't know what will make me bash my head in more, the original issue here or the mysterious fix? I've been tinkering with it all morning and disabled this and that, reinstalled this and that, making no progress, decided to toss in another NIC and couldn't find the drivers for it, couldn't remember the model anyway, plugged back into primary NIC, checked my stats and all are perfect again. Ha. I hate that. We'll see where this goes. Smiley Frustrated

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Posts: 6,944

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

If you connected the modem to the entry point cable and ended up with 1 to 3 dBmV down and 45 dBmV up, the tech would say that is fine and probably wouldn't touch anything. If you have a splitter at that point you automatically lose 3.5 dB on the downstream side. Any other losses are due to the cabling that runs from that entry point to your workstation. It sounds like there is a problem with that cable or with its connectors. If there is a splitter at that point, usually the internet cable is connected to the 3.5 db port. A dual port splitter will drop each port by 3.5 dB. When you move up to running more ports on the splitter, you would normally run the TV and phone modems on the 7 dB drop and leave the internet cable on the 3.5 dB port. So, in each case, you should normally see a 3.5 dB drop from the entry point to your modem location. Anything higher than that would mean that the wrong port is used, or that there is some issue with that specific cable. Is the house cable all RG-6? At the basement structured wiring cabinet, you should be able to read the cable data off the side of the cable to confirm that. You could inspect the cable ends and clean off any oxidation from the copper conductor. Ideally, if you had a cable compression tool handy, you could replace all of the compression connectors on the ends of that cable run, which would ensure clean connections all the way to the modem.

 

When the tech sets up your connections, he or she takes into account the incoming signal levels, the drops at each splitter port and the modem signal requirements in order to end up with the best overall result at each box.  Normally, there is enough signal excess at the cable entry point that an amplifier is not required.  The thing to remember is that the external cables and connectors don't last forever, and from the initial setup day, its all downhill from there.  It probably takes years for there to be enough degradation in either the cable or connectors to cause enough signal loss so that it becomes a problem.  Keeping an occasional eye on the signal levels at the internet modem can give you a good idea of the overall health of that external cabling, and when the time comes, call for a tech.



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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 28

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

upload speed so slow!!!

 

the upload speed was so slow since this morning.

by the way the cgn3 fireware was upgrade . now no more 2.4g light on birdge mode.

 

M1PVS}8JYUDQZ}[XQ`H$EHB.png

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Posts: 6,944

Re: Slow upload speeds and connection drops

  1. Can you have a look at the back of the modem and let me know which CGN3 series modem you have, CGN3, CGN3ACR, CGN3ACSMR or CGNM-3552?
  2. Please log into the modem and confirm which Software (Firmware) version is loaded.  I suspect that its 4.5.8.20
  3. Have a look on that same page, at the WAN address shown in the upper right hand corner. Are there two addresses shown side by side, one for IPV4 and one for IPV6 which a much longer address or does it show WAN IP Address: none, none ?
  4. Are you running the modem in Gateway mode or in Bridge mode with a router behind it?

To log into the modem, with a direct connection to the modem you can use 192.168.0.1 or 192.168.100.1 as the address in your web brower, and with the modem in Bridge mode with a router running behind it, you can only use 192.168.100.1