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Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

Hi guys, I'm hoping someone can help us because technical support hasn't been able to find an issue.

 

Problem

  • Wired conenction to TVs: Pixelating, freezing, Youtube.Netflix fails to load
  • Wireless on Laptops and IPad: very slow loading of webpages.
  • Issue is not consistent and happens periodically:

Supporting Details:

  • So we recently upgraded to Rogers Hybrid30 and for some reason my internet slowed down considerably.  (We were previously supposed to get 25Mbps DL and now are at 30Mbps). 
  • I called Rogers Technical Support the next day and they said I would need to upgrade to the newer Modem so I did that even though it cost more to rent. 
  • After upgrading seems the problem is still the same if not worst.
  • My modem is on main floor so wired conenction to TV and wirelss interference should not be an issue.
  • Ran Rogers Speed Test and download rate is conistantly above 30Mbps.
  • Modem = Hitron CGN3ROG

What have we tried:

  • Rogers Tech replaced splitters
  • Rebooted modem (Many times)
  • Changed cables.
  • I have changed the channels for the Hitron to Channel 11 and the second D-Link Router to Channel 1 to avoid inerference.  They were both on 'auto' before but this hasn't made a difference.

Other details:

  • Hitron modem is enabled as wireless router for main floor and second floor.
  • We have a second D-Link wireless router conencted to the Hirton Modem to act as a router for the basement.  Conenction for this router is a lot slower less than 10Mbps consitently.  Not sure why but coul dit have to do with the length of the ethernet cable used to connect it?

 

Are there any other setting I can look into?

 

Thanks fro your help!

Kaki

 

 

***edited labels***

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Good Day,

 

That’s a pile of info to digest, but here goes . I’ve copied the various questions and pasted them into a list near the bottom:

 

Your signal levels and signal to noise ratios on the RG-6 cable are really good. They’re at good levels to start, as from now on, over time, the downstream numbers will drop very slowly as the external cable and connectors age. At the same time the modem upstream signal levels will slowly rise to compensate for the cables and connectors. It should be a few years before they need any attention.

 

The firmware on the CGN3 is the latest version so you won’t suffer from any throttling effects that the last version had due to a firmware bug. For the cable that runs down to the D-Link router you should end up seeing 100 Mb/s max on a wired speedtest through the D-Link router.

 

Ports:

 

Port 1: Rogers SHM. It is what it is. Can’t do much about that although it is possible to run it off of a single modem, which could be food for thought later on. Running at 100 Mb/s

 

Port 2: This looks to be a combination issue of wiring enroute to the downstairs location and the router itself. Running at 100 Mb/s

 

Port 3: Looks ok, running at 1 Gb/s Does your family do much streaming off of the Western Digital drive to the tv or other devices? I’m wondering if that streaming demand through the CGN3 comes into play when you are trying to watch Netflix on the tv.

 

Port 4: Only running at 100 Mb/s which is a little surprising to me. I’d like to confirm the specs just to be sure of the tv Ethernet port rate.

 

Wireless connections: I’m assuming here that these all run off of the CGN3? Please correct me if I am wrong. Do you migrate any of them back and forth from the D-Link router or are they always running off of the CGN3? I would say that if you are happy with running these off of the 5 Ghz network, I would leave them as is. The only thing I would change is to set the CGN3 channel to 155 or higher, as the allowable wifi output power levels are higher for the higher channels. That will help your reception for the mobile devices, unless of course you have a neighbour already running on that channel. This is where the latest version of inSSIDer comes in handy in determining if anyone is using those upper channels. Is the Google Chrome Cast connected to the Sharp 70 inch tv, or does that run another tv?

 

D-Link Configuration: You’ve taken care to ensure that there are no IP address conflicts between the CGN3 and the D-Link. Do you run anything wireless off of this router, or do you use it mainly for wired connections? I’m just wondering how this fits into picture when the CGN3 wireless is up and running. As Gdkitty indicated, running a second router as an access point is simpler in the bigger scheme of the network. As part of testing tv performance I would definitely disconnect this at the CGN3 and see if there are any positive effects from that disconnection.

 

You could also run an experiment fairly easily. If you save the configuration of the D-Link in a backup file, you can then try to reconfigure it to run as an access point. When I did this I left the firewall on, but I was connecting through a LAN port instead of the WAN port and it never seemed to cause any issues. Unplugging this router for a test should already have given you some indication as to whether or not it was causing problems for the tv. If you are not satisfied with the access point results, you would simply reload the configuration file, reboot the router and you’re back in business.

 

Items to check and confirm:

 

“So when I bring my D-Link upstairs and connect with another cable the speeds double to about 22-23Mbps.  The light on the back of the Hitron is still Green.” So, it looks like that router only has a 10/100 WAN port. Does the cable that you used for that test actually support gigabit rates (amber LED). What model is the router and was that a wired or wireless speedtest? I’m wondering why that test result is so low and I’m thinking that you are running the 30 mb/s down, 5 Mb/s up plan? Is that correct?

 

It looks like you are only seeing 100 Mb/s on the cable downstairs. Is that cable buried in the wall with a proper RJ-45 port in a wall plate, or did the contractor cheat and use a purchased single piece cable with RJ-45 ends on it and somehow install that? If it’s a single piece cable I would expect it to support gigabit data rates. If its installed Cat-5e cable it might simply be a matter of correctly installing new keystones (connectors) at both ends of the cable. Ethernet cables are comprised of 4 wire pairs. Two wire pairs are all that is needed to support 100 Mb/s. All four wire pairs must be connected end to end, connector to connector to support gigabit data rates. In the past, I think it was common to install two of the four wire pairs on a connector and just wrap the other two pairs back along the cable or cut them to get them out of the way. Along comes a new owner who doesn’t know how the connectors were installed and he or she ends up having to correct the installation. Too bad it wasn’t done right the first time around.

 

If this is a typical wallplate port installation, take the wallplate off the wall and have a look at the back of the connector to see if two or four wire pairs are used. The old style of connector uses screw attachment points. New keystones are punch down type connectors, where the wires are individually pushed down into an assembly that locks the wires in place. If only two wire pairs are used, it isn’t a hard task to cut the end of the cable off of the connector and install a new keystone, using all four wire pairs. If all four pairs are already used, then one or both of the wire pairs that are needed to support gigabit rates are not installed correctly or not punched down correctly. We can figure that out when you see what is buried in the wall. Here is a link to a video that shows how to install a keystone on an Ethernet cable:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gxNZoPcnP4

 

While you are there you can also check to see if there is structured wiring installed but not used.  That is a wire bundle comprised of two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable, one Cat 5e for data and one Cat 3 (or maybe Cat 5e) for telephone.  Contractors will typically connect a cable connector or phone connector on one line and leave the rest tucked in behind the wallplate.  It’s up to the home owner to install the remaining connectors.  The other end of the structured wiring should terminate downstairs in a structured wiring cabinet, which is where your incoming phone and RG-6 cable from external connection points also terminate.

 

Gigabit switch: I use a D-Link DGS-1008D which I see is now up to a DGS-1008G model. There are a few manufactures of these, but in short you want an unmanaged 10/100/1000 Mb/s switch. Depending on what you find with the structured wiring, you might decide that you want to complete the wiring to all of the rooms in the house if it is installed, in which case something like an 8 port switch would probably come close to supporting all of the rooms. That is what I did, finish all of the cabling to the rooms where the wiring was installed and plug the Ethernet cabling into an 8 port switch. The switch is in the basement while the CGN3 is in the main floor office. If you don’t need 8 ports now or in the future, something like a 5 port gigabit switch would suffice.

 

 

Questions:

 

Do you run all of your mobile devices off of the 5 Ghz CGN3 network?

 

Do you migrate any of them back and forth from the D-Link router at any time or are they always running off of the CGN3?

 

Is the Google Chrome Cast connected to the Sharp 70 inch tv, or does that run another tv?

 

When you brought the D-Link router upstairs to test it, were the 22-23Mbps test results from a wired or wireless test?

 

Does the cable that you used for that test actually support gigabit rates (amber LED)?

 

What model is the router?

 

Are you running the 30 mb/s down, 5 Mb/s up plan?

 

Does the Ethernet cable that is buried in the wall have a proper RJ-45 port in a wall plate, or did the contractor cheat and use a purchased single piece cable with RJ-45 ends on it and somehow install that?

 

If the Ethernet cable that runs downstairs is actual installed cabling, can you determine if two or all four wire pairs of the Ethernet cable are used and physically attached to the connector?

 

Is that the same situation downstairs?

 

Were you able to determine if there is structured wiring installed but not used, ie extra cables hidden behind the wallplate?

 

Can you run a speed test on port 4 with a short Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable and then run another speedtest at the tv end of CGN3 to tv cable and post those results.

 

Is there any chance that the tv ethernet cable runs close to any electrical or electronic equipment on its way to the tv, picking up electrical noise that might be generated by that equipment?

 

 

Thoughts:

 

After all of this, I’m still perplexed by the pixelating issue with the tv, so I’m wondering what the port 4 speedtests will show. I can’t imagine that you are running Netflix at high resolutions, unless you are paying extra for unlimited usage, but I wonder about the combined load of running Netflix, and streaming video or data off of the hard drive at the same time. Running tests to isolate the ports should help in coming to a possible conclusion on this. Maybe the CGN3 just simply isn’t cutting it with everything running, in which case, another, more capable router is in order. If I’ve done the math correctly, even at the highest resolution, its only 2 Mb/s, so its not terribly demanding. We run Netflix on low resolution on a 60 inch with other members of the family watching twitch and gaming and whatever else and have never had any issues with pixilation. Low res on the 60 inch looks fine but one of these days I’ll try a higher resolution. We’ve run the CGN3 in both gateway and bridge modes as well and have never had any issues with pixilation.

 

I would consider replacing the D-Link with another router. If you didn’t want something as expensive as the RT-AC68U, ensure that you buy a router that has external antenna and gigabit WAN and LAN ports. If the reason for placing the D-Link router downstairs is to support wired connections then you would see much better service from a gigabit switch. I’m not sure what the goal is, so its hard to make an absolute recommendation. Depending on what you are trying to do, you could consider the following. Buy something like an RT-AC68U dual band router and a gigabit switch. Bridge the CGN3 modem. Connect the router to PORT 1 of the CGN3. Connect the home monitoring Netgear router to Port 2 of the CGN3. Connect the TV, hard drive and downstairs cable to the router LAN ports. Run both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks off of the router. It is most likely that whatever you buy, it will have better wifi performance than the CGN3, which is why I would run the CGN3 in bridge mode.

 

I would also look at changing the connector ends of the Ethernet cable that runs downstairs. While using a gigabit switch will allow more devices to run off the switch, you would still be limited to 100 Mb/s max if you did not solve the issue with the cable. If you do any streaming off the hard drive, having that cable running at 1 Gb/s will give you much faster transfers downstairs.  If you were only accessing the internet that would be more than sufficient if you are only running 30 Mb/s down, and 5 Mb/s up. 



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15 REPLIES 15

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Can you log into the modem, navigate to the DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into this thread.  Those tables contain the RG-6 signal levels and signal to noise ratios for the modem feed cable.  So, thats a starting point. 

 

Can you also confirm from the front STATUS page if you have firmware version 4.2.4.5 loaded, which is the latest version.

 

Can you also list by port number, the cables (Cat 5e, Cat 6) and devices that are connected to the CGN3 ports.  Port 1 is on the bottom if the CGN3 is standing vertically.  Also look at the port LED that is shown next to the connected cables.  Amber means that the port is connected to a cable and device port that supports 1 Gb/s.  Green means that the port is connected to a cable or device port that only supports 10/100 Mb/s.  Also estimate the cable length if you can. 

 

Can you also list the wireless networks, 2.4 and 5 Ghz and what devices you have running on those networks.

 

That will give me a better idea of how everything connects to the CGN3.

 

Can you also list the D_Link router model number.  Is the D-Link router situated really close to the CGN3, or is it connected via long ethernet cable or house ethernet so that they don't interfere with each other?

 

While you are looking at that I'll keep pondering over your list  🙂

 

Edit:  Please show the CGN3 Port LED colour in your port list.

 

Please use this thread, I'll ask the Mods to delete the other post.



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Ok, continuing on here…..

 

One point to consider is whether or not the D-Link router is set to run properly behind another router. Normally, a router has a straight modem sitting in front of it, so the router does everything, including firewall, packet inspection, port forwarding etc, etc. In your case you have a router sitting in front of the D-Link router. If you haven’t done it already, you need to do the following:

 

  1. Assign a separate LAN IP address to it which is outside of the range of the CGN3 IP Address Range. That will allow you to log into the D-Link router to change any settings if necessary.
  2. Turn off the D-Link DHCP server, allowing the CGN3 to assign LAN addresses to all devices on the network, except of course of the D-Link router itself. If you still wanted to run the D-Link DHCP server for some reason, you would have to assign a separate IP address range to the D-Link router so that there is never any address conflict between the CGN3 and the D-Link router. If you do any port forwarding on the D-Link Router, running it behind another router makes port forwarding more difficult to set up and run properly.
  3. If you only use the D-Link router for wifi purposes, you can turn it into an access point by setting it up as indicated above (DHCP off preferred), set up your wifi parameters, and when everything is saved, reboot the D-Link router and while it is rebooting change the inbound connection from the WAN port to one of the LAN ports.

I ran that configuration for many years with a D-Link 655 router and never had any problems with it. Running a wired speedtest through the router, which was connected through the house ethernet cabling and a gigabit switch to the CGN3, I would see 320+ Mb/s while the wireless would top out around 50 or 60 Mb/s.



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Further thoughts on troubleshooting…..

 

You’ve indicated poor performance on both wired TV and wireless devices. I suspect that part of the wireless issue is due to the performance of the CGN3 itself as well as possible interference from neighbouring routers. First though, I’d like to tackle the wired connections. Without knowing how the D-Link router is set up, my first thoughts are to disconnect it, and disconnect everything else but the TV. Turn off the CGN3 wifi as well. This is to allow you to test each port and device one by one. There was a case not so very long ago where adding devices port by port would have make things much easier to sort out, so that is what I would recommend. In that particular case the CGN3 was kept busy by a malfunctioning device, degrading service to all of the other connected devices. Moral of the story, disconnect everything if necessary and then add them one by one.

 

I’m making an assumption here that the CGN3 is running as it should. If there are any doubts, run a factory reset and re-enter the parameters as required.

 

If you have a laptop with a gigabit Ethernet port on it, you can use that as a test platform to check cabling. First thing I would do is disconnect the TV end of the Ethernet cable and connect it to the laptop. Take a look at the back of the CGN3 and confirm that the port LED is amber, indicating a 1 Gb/s interconnect rate with the laptop. If it turns out to be green, then the port is only running at 100 Mb/s, and if it is a Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable, then the cable is either damaged or not connecting properly at either end. I’m assuming that the TV has a gigabit port on it, but I could be wrong as I don’t know what model it is. If the cable turns out to run only at 100 Mb/s, then the question is, does it need replacing, and that will depend on the TV Ethernet port. If the cable tests fine, and the port LED on the CGN3 is amber, reconnect the cable to the TV and check to determine if the port LED is still amber. If so, success, the CGN3, Ethernet cable and TV port are running at 1 Gb/s. Take a seat and test out the TV, looking for Pixelating, freezing, Youtube and Netflix failing to load. Hopefully with only a single device connected, you should be ok. The only other hiccup on Netflix could be the resolution, which I don’t have at the top of my head, in terms of the data rates that are required. That might be something you need to look up and compare with your Rogers internet plan speeds. If the port LED changes to green after connecting to the TV, I would look up the TV specs to determine if 100 Mb/s is the max data rate for the port. I would think that it should run higher, but I haven’t looked at any smart TV specs to know what to expect.

 

Next step, next port. Same procedure, use a gigabit port equipped laptop to prove out the Ethernet cable to the next device. If its fine or if you have to replace it, once checked, connect to the next device and check to determine the CGN3 port LED colour so that you know what data rate the device is connecting at. Test out the device and retest the TV looking for performance issues on both.

 

Next step, next port. Same procedure. When you have finally connected the port three device, test that device, the other device and TV once again, looking for performance issues.

 

Last step. D-Link router. Check the specs to determine if the router has gigabit WAN and LAN ports. Reconfigure the router as I had previously indicated so that it will operate with another router sitting in front of it. When that is done, and you have tested the connecting cable, reconnect to a D-Link LAN port and restart the router (Power off…..Power on). Test one of the wireless devices that you normally use with that router and then return to testing the other connected devices and TV.

 

Hopefully all is going well at this point, or, you have found the cause of the issue.

 

Wireless performance issues: Combo modem / routers don’t have steller wifi reputations or performance unfortunately. I know that the 5 Ghz network runs well enough on the CGN3 but I can’t vouch for the 2.4 Ghz network as I never used it. I had the D-Link up and running instead. This has since been replaced with the CGN3 running in Bridge mode with an ASUS RT-AC68U router, which is a common configuration for many people here. If you have any 802.11ac devices, that is the way to go, not that you want to spend any money on routers, but consider the results that you get after troubleshooting the problems you are having now. You might come to the conclusion that a newer third party router might be the solution to wifi issues. Food for thought as they say.

 

Just to note, the CGN3 does not support mixed 20 Mhz / 40 Mhz environments on its 2.4 Ghz networks. To run higher data rates, routers and devices use channel bonding on 2.4 Ghz networks to run two 20 Mhz wide channels together and push more data. Most but not all routers support mixed environments where you have some devices that can do that and some that can’t. The CGN3 does not support a mixed environment and it will throttle down to the slowest device on the network. So if that happens to be a single channel device, then your dual channel laptops and tablets will only be able to use a single channel and as a result will appear to be running slower than what you would expect. Also note, the CGN3 is not certified for concurrent 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks. The Wifi Alliance certificate only shows one or the other. Take that into consideration when you are looking at wifi issues with the CGN3. I can attest that it runs really well with just the 5 Ghz network running. 

 

For now however, the way to check wifi issues is to look at your wifi environment by loading inSSIDer on a laptop and checking the network display. That display will show you how many other routers are running nearby and whether or not any of them are running on the same channel and causing problems for you. If you can post a screen capture somewhere, that really helps when it comes to diagnosing wifi issues. Here is the link to the last freebie version of inSSIDer. It does not do 802.11ac, which is becoming more prevalent these days, so my advice to anyone who really wants to continue using inSSIDer is to spend the $20 to buy the latest version. You might be amazed to see how many people are using 802.11ac nearby. You don’t need an 802.11ac laptop as the header data shows the transmission type, and that can be read and displayed by a non 802.11ac laptop.

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

That’s it for now. There is a little homework ahead of you to track down the issues. Please keeping posting your results and questions.



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

@Datalink, Wow! Great, you have covered all aspects, hats off!Smiley Happy

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

Wow... Thanks for the very detailed response!!!  Here is my best try in answering all the questions:

 

  1. Copy/Paste of the DOCSIS WAN:

Downstream Overview Port ID Frequency (MHz) Modulation Signal strength (dBmV) Signal noise ratio (dB) Channel ID 1 591000000 256QAM 3.400 38.983 1 2 597000000 256QAM 3.500 38.605 2 3 603000000 256QAM 3.000 38.983 3 4 609000000 256QAM 2.600 38.983 4 5 615000000 256QAM 2.600 38.983 5 6 621000000 256QAM 2.700 38.983 6 7 633000000 256QAM 2.900 38.605 7 8 639000000 256QAM 2.600 38.605 8 9 645000000 256QAM 3.000 38.983 9 10 651000000 256QAM 3.600 38.605 10 11 657000000 256QAM 3.200 38.605 11 12 663000000 256QAM 2.600 37.636 12 13 669000000 256QAM 2.600 38.605 13 14 675000000 256QAM 2.600 37.636 14 15 681000000 256QAM 3.000 37.636 15 16 687000000 256QAM 3.200 37.636 16 17 693000000 256QAM 3.100 37.636 17 18 699000000 256QAM 2.800 37.636 18 19 705000000 256QAM 2.500 37.636 19 20 711000000 256QAM 2.800 37.636 20

 
Upstream Overview Port ID Frequency (MHz) BandWidth Modulation Type Signal Strength (dBmV) Channel ID 1 23700000 6400000 ATDMA 39.000 3 2 30596000 6400000 ATDMA 39.000 2 3 38596000 3200000 ATDMA 40.500

1

 
2. CGN3 Firmware:
 
HW Version 1A SW Version 4.2.4.5
 
3. Port Connections & LED Color & Cable Type (Bottom to Top):
 
  • Port 1: Netgear Wireless N150 WNR1000 Router for Rogers SHM & Green LED & No Indicator on Cable type (Rogers Yellow Cable)
  • Port 2: D-Link Wireless N300 Router & Green LED & CAT 5E
  • Port 3: Western Digital My Cloud Hard Drive & Amber & CAT 5E
  • Port 4: 70" Sharp Smart tv (222u1302091) & Green LED & CAT 5

 

4. My other devices that I conenct to using my 5Ghz connection (Should I be using the 2.4Ghz conenction?):

  • Ipad Mini 2nd Gen
  • HP Elitebook 2540p
  • HP Elitebook 8470p
  • Blackberry Z10
  • Iphone 5S
  • Sony PS3
  • Google Chrome Cast

 

5. D-Link Configuration:

 

  • It is on a seperate subnet then my Hirton.  Hirton is on 192.168.0.1 & D-Link is on 192.168.1.1  I wanted to have them on separate networks but if this is the cause of the issue I will change them onto one network.
  • D-Link is currently setup to assign IP addresses
  • D-Link is conencted using a 25ft CAT5E cable on another floor on different channels
  • D-Link has a different SSID then the Hitron
  • D-Link is setup as a Router and not Access point

 

6. What are my options?

  • Can you recommend another wireless router that would work better with the Hitron?  I just bought D-Link and can return it as it is no better than my old lynksys.
  • I read that buying a Gigabyte swtich can help, can you recommend one?

I hope I covered everything if not I will read through your post again and reply in a different post..

 

Thanks a million for your help!

-Kaki

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

Following up to my previous post, I tested each port using my laptop and the results are below:

 

Port 1: Light turns Amber when Laptop Connected - Netgear Router for SHM

 

Port 2: Light stays Green when Laptop Connected - D-Link Router

  • So I looked into this further and switched the cable and the light turned Amber.  So it looks like the cable I currently have run to the basement is only able to support 10/100.  The problem is I can't; change this cable easily, as it was run by the builder.  Would a Gigbyte switch help fix this issue?

Port 3: Light stays Amber when Laptop Connected - Western Digital My Cloud Hard Drive

 

Port 4: Light turns Amber when Laptop Connected - 70" Sharp Smart tv (222u1302091)

 

Thanks,

-Kaki

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

So when I brign my D-Link upstairs and connect with anotehr cable the speeds double to about 22-23Mbps.  The light on the back of the Hitron is still Green.  Is there a router that has a GigaByte port that I can buy, would this potentially increase the speeds?  Thx.

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Yeah, if your only getting green no matter what with the DLINK router.. than its only 10/100 ports on it likely.

(your cabling MIGHT be fine then for gigabit.. only real test would be to plug in a KNOWN gigabit device in the other location and see if it shows up right).

 

Switching with a better router with gigabit ports, should work fine.

As for doing the different subnet, etc...
Unless absolutely necessary.. (to seperate networks, etc)... personally would not do it.
You are then DOUBLE routing the information.. through the dlink AND the CGN3.. its doing twice the work, going through TWO NAT's, two firewalls, etc... its just asking for trouble.

You would be best, to set the unit there as an ACCESS POINT only, and let the CGN3 then do the assignments, etc.



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Hi, I'm still reviewing your responses, but yes, there definitely are routers with gigabit ports available.  My vote, and probably the same for many others here is for the ASUS RT-AC68U.  Its around $230 these days, but, seeing the difference in peak speedtest data rates for our gaming laptop (CGN3: 200 Mp/s wireless, AC68U: 325+ Mb/s wireless) I don't have any regrets buying it. 

 

What model is the D-Link router?

 

Can you also confirm the specific model number of the tv?  Is that a LC-70LE640U, or LC-70C6400U by chance?  I'm trying to find the specs for the ethernet port, but just want to confirm that I'm looking for the correct tv.



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Good Day,

 

That’s a pile of info to digest, but here goes . I’ve copied the various questions and pasted them into a list near the bottom:

 

Your signal levels and signal to noise ratios on the RG-6 cable are really good. They’re at good levels to start, as from now on, over time, the downstream numbers will drop very slowly as the external cable and connectors age. At the same time the modem upstream signal levels will slowly rise to compensate for the cables and connectors. It should be a few years before they need any attention.

 

The firmware on the CGN3 is the latest version so you won’t suffer from any throttling effects that the last version had due to a firmware bug. For the cable that runs down to the D-Link router you should end up seeing 100 Mb/s max on a wired speedtest through the D-Link router.

 

Ports:

 

Port 1: Rogers SHM. It is what it is. Can’t do much about that although it is possible to run it off of a single modem, which could be food for thought later on. Running at 100 Mb/s

 

Port 2: This looks to be a combination issue of wiring enroute to the downstairs location and the router itself. Running at 100 Mb/s

 

Port 3: Looks ok, running at 1 Gb/s Does your family do much streaming off of the Western Digital drive to the tv or other devices? I’m wondering if that streaming demand through the CGN3 comes into play when you are trying to watch Netflix on the tv.

 

Port 4: Only running at 100 Mb/s which is a little surprising to me. I’d like to confirm the specs just to be sure of the tv Ethernet port rate.

 

Wireless connections: I’m assuming here that these all run off of the CGN3? Please correct me if I am wrong. Do you migrate any of them back and forth from the D-Link router or are they always running off of the CGN3? I would say that if you are happy with running these off of the 5 Ghz network, I would leave them as is. The only thing I would change is to set the CGN3 channel to 155 or higher, as the allowable wifi output power levels are higher for the higher channels. That will help your reception for the mobile devices, unless of course you have a neighbour already running on that channel. This is where the latest version of inSSIDer comes in handy in determining if anyone is using those upper channels. Is the Google Chrome Cast connected to the Sharp 70 inch tv, or does that run another tv?

 

D-Link Configuration: You’ve taken care to ensure that there are no IP address conflicts between the CGN3 and the D-Link. Do you run anything wireless off of this router, or do you use it mainly for wired connections? I’m just wondering how this fits into picture when the CGN3 wireless is up and running. As Gdkitty indicated, running a second router as an access point is simpler in the bigger scheme of the network. As part of testing tv performance I would definitely disconnect this at the CGN3 and see if there are any positive effects from that disconnection.

 

You could also run an experiment fairly easily. If you save the configuration of the D-Link in a backup file, you can then try to reconfigure it to run as an access point. When I did this I left the firewall on, but I was connecting through a LAN port instead of the WAN port and it never seemed to cause any issues. Unplugging this router for a test should already have given you some indication as to whether or not it was causing problems for the tv. If you are not satisfied with the access point results, you would simply reload the configuration file, reboot the router and you’re back in business.

 

Items to check and confirm:

 

“So when I bring my D-Link upstairs and connect with another cable the speeds double to about 22-23Mbps.  The light on the back of the Hitron is still Green.” So, it looks like that router only has a 10/100 WAN port. Does the cable that you used for that test actually support gigabit rates (amber LED). What model is the router and was that a wired or wireless speedtest? I’m wondering why that test result is so low and I’m thinking that you are running the 30 mb/s down, 5 Mb/s up plan? Is that correct?

 

It looks like you are only seeing 100 Mb/s on the cable downstairs. Is that cable buried in the wall with a proper RJ-45 port in a wall plate, or did the contractor cheat and use a purchased single piece cable with RJ-45 ends on it and somehow install that? If it’s a single piece cable I would expect it to support gigabit data rates. If its installed Cat-5e cable it might simply be a matter of correctly installing new keystones (connectors) at both ends of the cable. Ethernet cables are comprised of 4 wire pairs. Two wire pairs are all that is needed to support 100 Mb/s. All four wire pairs must be connected end to end, connector to connector to support gigabit data rates. In the past, I think it was common to install two of the four wire pairs on a connector and just wrap the other two pairs back along the cable or cut them to get them out of the way. Along comes a new owner who doesn’t know how the connectors were installed and he or she ends up having to correct the installation. Too bad it wasn’t done right the first time around.

 

If this is a typical wallplate port installation, take the wallplate off the wall and have a look at the back of the connector to see if two or four wire pairs are used. The old style of connector uses screw attachment points. New keystones are punch down type connectors, where the wires are individually pushed down into an assembly that locks the wires in place. If only two wire pairs are used, it isn’t a hard task to cut the end of the cable off of the connector and install a new keystone, using all four wire pairs. If all four pairs are already used, then one or both of the wire pairs that are needed to support gigabit rates are not installed correctly or not punched down correctly. We can figure that out when you see what is buried in the wall. Here is a link to a video that shows how to install a keystone on an Ethernet cable:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0gxNZoPcnP4

 

While you are there you can also check to see if there is structured wiring installed but not used.  That is a wire bundle comprised of two RG-6 cables for satellite or cable, one Cat 5e for data and one Cat 3 (or maybe Cat 5e) for telephone.  Contractors will typically connect a cable connector or phone connector on one line and leave the rest tucked in behind the wallplate.  It’s up to the home owner to install the remaining connectors.  The other end of the structured wiring should terminate downstairs in a structured wiring cabinet, which is where your incoming phone and RG-6 cable from external connection points also terminate.

 

Gigabit switch: I use a D-Link DGS-1008D which I see is now up to a DGS-1008G model. There are a few manufactures of these, but in short you want an unmanaged 10/100/1000 Mb/s switch. Depending on what you find with the structured wiring, you might decide that you want to complete the wiring to all of the rooms in the house if it is installed, in which case something like an 8 port switch would probably come close to supporting all of the rooms. That is what I did, finish all of the cabling to the rooms where the wiring was installed and plug the Ethernet cabling into an 8 port switch. The switch is in the basement while the CGN3 is in the main floor office. If you don’t need 8 ports now or in the future, something like a 5 port gigabit switch would suffice.

 

 

Questions:

 

Do you run all of your mobile devices off of the 5 Ghz CGN3 network?

 

Do you migrate any of them back and forth from the D-Link router at any time or are they always running off of the CGN3?

 

Is the Google Chrome Cast connected to the Sharp 70 inch tv, or does that run another tv?

 

When you brought the D-Link router upstairs to test it, were the 22-23Mbps test results from a wired or wireless test?

 

Does the cable that you used for that test actually support gigabit rates (amber LED)?

 

What model is the router?

 

Are you running the 30 mb/s down, 5 Mb/s up plan?

 

Does the Ethernet cable that is buried in the wall have a proper RJ-45 port in a wall plate, or did the contractor cheat and use a purchased single piece cable with RJ-45 ends on it and somehow install that?

 

If the Ethernet cable that runs downstairs is actual installed cabling, can you determine if two or all four wire pairs of the Ethernet cable are used and physically attached to the connector?

 

Is that the same situation downstairs?

 

Were you able to determine if there is structured wiring installed but not used, ie extra cables hidden behind the wallplate?

 

Can you run a speed test on port 4 with a short Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable and then run another speedtest at the tv end of CGN3 to tv cable and post those results.

 

Is there any chance that the tv ethernet cable runs close to any electrical or electronic equipment on its way to the tv, picking up electrical noise that might be generated by that equipment?

 

 

Thoughts:

 

After all of this, I’m still perplexed by the pixelating issue with the tv, so I’m wondering what the port 4 speedtests will show. I can’t imagine that you are running Netflix at high resolutions, unless you are paying extra for unlimited usage, but I wonder about the combined load of running Netflix, and streaming video or data off of the hard drive at the same time. Running tests to isolate the ports should help in coming to a possible conclusion on this. Maybe the CGN3 just simply isn’t cutting it with everything running, in which case, another, more capable router is in order. If I’ve done the math correctly, even at the highest resolution, its only 2 Mb/s, so its not terribly demanding. We run Netflix on low resolution on a 60 inch with other members of the family watching twitch and gaming and whatever else and have never had any issues with pixilation. Low res on the 60 inch looks fine but one of these days I’ll try a higher resolution. We’ve run the CGN3 in both gateway and bridge modes as well and have never had any issues with pixilation.

 

I would consider replacing the D-Link with another router. If you didn’t want something as expensive as the RT-AC68U, ensure that you buy a router that has external antenna and gigabit WAN and LAN ports. If the reason for placing the D-Link router downstairs is to support wired connections then you would see much better service from a gigabit switch. I’m not sure what the goal is, so its hard to make an absolute recommendation. Depending on what you are trying to do, you could consider the following. Buy something like an RT-AC68U dual band router and a gigabit switch. Bridge the CGN3 modem. Connect the router to PORT 1 of the CGN3. Connect the home monitoring Netgear router to Port 2 of the CGN3. Connect the TV, hard drive and downstairs cable to the router LAN ports. Run both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks off of the router. It is most likely that whatever you buy, it will have better wifi performance than the CGN3, which is why I would run the CGN3 in bridge mode.

 

I would also look at changing the connector ends of the Ethernet cable that runs downstairs. While using a gigabit switch will allow more devices to run off the switch, you would still be limited to 100 Mb/s max if you did not solve the issue with the cable. If you do any streaming off the hard drive, having that cable running at 1 Gb/s will give you much faster transfers downstairs.  If you were only accessing the internet that would be more than sufficient if you are only running 30 Mb/s down, and 5 Mb/s up. 



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Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

Thank you everyone for the help!  I'm going to do some further investigating and wil get back to you guys shortly!  Thx,

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

@Kaki , thank you for responding back, you are definitely at the right place with lot of expertise in this ForumSmiley Happy

 

@Datalink , I can’t stop myself from appreciating the detailed replies and helping out the community. Thank you and to all who always eager to help the community!Smiley Happy

 

I am little confused, regarding the below passage:

-------------

Bridge the CGN3 modem. Connect the router to PORT 1 of the CGN3. Connect the home monitoring Netgear router to Port 2 of the CGN3. Connect the TV, hard drive and downstairs cable to the router LAN ports. Run both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks off of the router. It is most likely that whatever you buy, it will have better wifi performance than the CGN3, which is why I would run the CGN3 in bridge mode.

------------

Do you mean disable wireless(wifi) on CGN3? So that all Ethernet ports can be used?

Or do you actually meant bridge(disable Residential Gateway Function)? Because when modem in bridge mode only 1 Ethernet port is technically available i.e. 1 public IP per mode. In some cases, in bridge mode utilizing more than 1 port will work for little while, then it will stop or becomes intermittent.

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Hi RogersMoin,

 

Thanks for the kind words. Yes, my advice or instruction was to kick the CGN3 into bridge mode and use ports one and two to support Kaki’s router and the Home Monitoring Netgear router. That was based on comments that I’ve seen from other RE’s and forum members who do just that, use a modem in bridge mode and end up with two IP addresses by using more than one port. I haven’t seen any comments indicating that there were any issues, so your comments are the first. If that is what will happen, then it’s a case of good idea, no cigar, and back to the drawing board. It’s easy enough to connect the Netgear router to whatever router Kaki decides to purchase, but I thought this was a good case to try this out. There are still a number of other issues to sort out, so this may not come to fruition at all. 🙂



Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Kaki
I'm Here A Lot

@Datalink & @RogersMoin, so in regards to the Ethernet cable I have running into the basement the builder ran this but I had a friend crimp on the ends.  Builder just ran the cable, no jacks.

 

I also want to note that they ran the same cable for the telephone so this cable may be a bit different.  I cut the cabel to re-crimp them and noticed that it's not your traditional twisted pair.  It has all the colours but no white wires with a stripe, they have dark orange and light orange, dark blue and light blue, etc.

 

Could that be the issue?  Thx.

Re: Slow speeds with Hybrid Fibre 30 & Hitron CNG3

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

It might be more a question of "Is this a Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable?"  Is there enough slack in the cable that you can pull out enough length to read the data printed on the cable?  That would be the first thing that I would do, just to confirm what cable type it is.  The colours you see are probably due to the manufacturers choice of colours.  Instead of a solid orange and white with orange stripe, you see a dark orange, light orange.  The dark and light colour should form a twisted pair, and you should have 4 twisted pairs in the cable, and those 4 pairs (8 individual wires) should be physically attached to a keystone (ethernet port).  From the keystone, which sits in the wallplate, you would then run a short, commercially produced Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable to the pc or laptop or tv ethernet port. 

 

When you say that there is a crimped end, it sounds like there is an RJ-45 connector on the end of the cable instead of a keystone.  If so, its really easy to end up with a wire that isn't pushed all the way to the end of the connector or, one or more individual wires that end up in the wrong order, despite your best attempts to order them correctly and push them into the connector.  Installing and crimping RJ-45 connectors takes patience, practice, and a test device to make sure that its crimped properly.  Here is what you would need to make sure that the cable ends, RJ-45 connectors, or keystones are correctly installed:

 

http://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/ideal-linkmastertrade-tester_g1199379.html

 

http://www.lowes.ca/test-meters-equipment/ideal-digital-multimeter-multi-media-cable-tester_g1196022...

 

The test devices allow you to check a cable, end to end and make sure that the individual wires are connected in the correct order, and that there is no short circuit or open circuit in the event that the end connectors are not installed properly.  They are worth having around and can show in a few seconds if an installed or purchased cable is operating properly, end to end.

 

Fwiw, keystones are much easier to install.  From the keystone, you then run a short Cat 5e or Cat 6 cable or patch cable to the device.

 

Edit:  If you are recrimping connectors on the ends of the cable, here are a few images or diagrams which show the 568B standard which is used for ethernet cables:

 

https://www.google.ca/search?q=rj45+568b&tbm=isch&imgil=lQOt9qI5MGKrrM%253A%253BV0oRz9STVYDGlM%253Bh...

 

if you look at those images, you will see that there are a couple of staggered wires within the cable, so its not a matter of inserting each wire pair into the connector so that they all sit side by side.