Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

So, I currently have the 25 GB package.  It has always been more than enough for me.  But just this week I became aware of a 'new' 25 GB offering called Internet 5, way cheaper than what I'm paying now for my current 25 GB plan.  I currently rent a high-speed modem from Rogers for $4 per month.   The only device in my home which is using the internet is my desktop computer which is connected to my high-speed modem via cable.  I know - "how quaint."   I don't have a smartphone, tablet, netbook, a smart tv, etc.  I don't own any bluetooth nor wi-fi enabled devices.  But Rogers is telling me that I need to have the $8 wi-fi modem in order to take advantage of the $25/month plan.

 

Could somebody please confirm that this is really the case, and explain why?  Also, if I were to swap my modem for the wi-fi one, am I going to be able to continue to connect my computer to that modem via a cable or am I then going to have to invest in a wireless adapter for my PC?

 

Thanks!

 

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Resident Expert
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Posts: 6,987

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

Thats an old modem.  My congrats on the fact that you still have it in operation.  I'm surprised that Rogers hasn't asked you to move to a newer modem prior to this.  Maybe they have?  The spec for that modem initially dates back to 1997.  It was certified originally with DOCSIS 1.0 (Data Over Cable Service Interface Specification) and possibly upgraded by Rogers to DOCSIS 2.0.  We're now at DOCSIS 3.0 and 3.1 modems (10 Gb/s) are now in the field undergoing testing, although probably not with Rogers at this time.  Each step up, from DOCSIS 1.0 to 2.0 and now to 3.0 has seen increased capacity in terms of the number of data channels that the modems support and the maximum data speeds that they will run.  Along with that has been increased security measures built into the modem to protect the customer and the ISP.  Basically you're running into the usual proverb "Time waits for no man" or in this case woman.  Time and technology has been moving forward in terms of the specs that govern the operation of the modems and Rogers has simply set a policy or minimum equipment standard which applies to the data plan that you are interested in.  Unfortunately the 2100 doesn't meet that minimum standard.  I have no doubt that technically it can run higher speeds, but in other aspects, such as security, it doesn't match the DOCSIS 3.0 specs that are in operation across the network.  However, you've certainly managed to get your money's worth out of it.



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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 357

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

Hey there @keltuc.

 

The modem you have is 'very' old. Within the last year or so, the $8.00 Wi-Fi Modem was introduced along with the $12.00 Advanced Wi-Fi Modem (themselves being outdone by the Rocket Modem that just came out recently). The Internet 5 package is designed only to work with the $8.00 Wi-Fi Modem, as the way things are currently set it is the only modem to support the Internet 5 service.  So yeah, that is indeed the case.

 

I'll leave the technical part of your question to one of the resident experts since I'm not any help on that end.

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I'm a Senior Advisor
Posts: 985

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

Yes, a computer can be connected directly to any Rogers modem.
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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,987

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

What modem do you currently have?  Rogers has been upgrading the modems from 4 channels down, 4 up, to 8 channels down, 4 up and now 24 channels down, 4 up, although only 20 out of 24 channels are used on the downstream and normally 3 of 4 on the upstream.  The decision has been made to move customers to modems which can use more channels on the downstream.  Although your modem is probably capable of running at a higher speed using 4 channels down, 4 up for example, that ties up the 4 downstream channels when people start running more data across those 4 specific channels.  Thus the move over time to run more channels down, allowing the data load to spread across a greater number of channels and avoid congestion for everyone.  When considering the network load it makes sense.  From a consumer aspect, many find this to be somewhat of a pain.  Your speeds aren't going up significantly yet you end up having to use a newer modem.  Knowing what modem you currently have and its channel capability might explain the reasons to move to a new modem.

 

As @Lurker indicated, you don't have to use the wireless capability of the modem at all, but it should be set to run encrypted wifi channels using long network names and passphrases just to ensure that if it ever goes live for any unknown reason, there would not be any chance of someone hopping onto an otherwise "default labelled" wifi network and using your bandwidth for unknown purposes.  Once the wifi networks are set, they can be disabled and forgotten about unless you decide to run a factory reset which puts everything back to their default settings.  The wifi settings are easy to take care of and we can help set those, just to ensure that they stay secure.



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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem


@lockdown2341 wrote:

Hey there @keltuc.

The Internet 5 package is designed only to work with the $8.00 Wi-Fi Modem, as the way things are currently set it is the only modem to support the Internet 5 service.  So yeah, that is indeed the case.


Whether or not it is designed to work that way is not really the point. The fact is that an older modem would easily support the Internet 5 package and in many ways, the "older" modems are better than some of the newer ones. As an example, Rogers has introduced the gateway modems such as SMC, Cisco and Hitron but none of them have been as rock solid as the older Motorola modems. My guess is that if you are pesistent and keep calling in you will eventally find someone at Rogers willing to authorize your older modem for the Internet 5 package and you will be better off for it. Some customers have had the same success in getting Rogers to authorize 3rd party stand alone modems (far superior to any gateway offered by Rogers) for use with Rogers. I know it is a pipe dream, but I cannot help but hope that Rogers will one day come to their senses and finally authorize a decent stand alone D3 modem. Just read the threads on here and all of the issues with ALL HITRON CGN models and you will know why!

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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 357

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

@Datalink

 

As the OP stated he is on the $4.00 rental modem. As far as what channels it uses, etc, I couldn't tell you. But I believe it was the modem used with the old Lite/Express/Extreme series of internet plans. Since the Hybrid Fibre packages came out last year, his modem is pre-2014, so whatever modems were being used at that time is what he would have, most likely.

 

We don't need to know the channel capability, etc, to explain why he needs to move to a new modem. As I stated above, the Internet 5 package will only work with the $8.00/month modem. Without that, we cannot change the package for him.

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

Thank you for the explanation -  I do understand it.  I don't however know what my modem's channel capabilities are, but these are it's specs: 

 

It's a Webstar by Scientific Atlanta,  DPX2100 Series.  Need I even mention the date of manufacture of January 2004?  Smiley Surprised  However, as I mentioned, it's perfectly fine for my internet usage purposes.  

 

It's simply aggravating when I'm trying to cut as many costs as possible that I'm limiting myself to 25 GB, that I have to actually upgrade my modem to one that's double the cost.   Kind of defeats the purpose.   

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Rogers Employee
Rogers Employee
Posts: 357

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

@JohhnyRockets It is the point though. The question from the OP wasn't whether or not his old modem could, theoretically, work with the new plan. He wanted to know why he had to change. I have explained this.

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I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 519

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

@lockdown2341

I have also explained that if persistent, she might find someone at Rogers willing to authorize and configure her older modem, just as some have been able to get 3rd party D3 modems configured with Rogers. 

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 13

Re: Rogers high speed modem versus wi-fi modem

I truly appreciate everyone's (ongoing!) input.  Just a wee note to @lockdown2341 that I'm a female.  Smiley Very Happy