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Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Had my install today!
Tech was really good and knowledgeable (well as much as they can be this early)

I need to head out shortly, so this will be just a QUICK overview, go into MUCH more detail about all the stuff when I get back later tonight.

Modem set up,  put at demarc.  Built in range was decent, but not great for my 3rd box, so installed a MESH wireless.  Seems to work well from what I can see.  (I am running NOT bridged right now.. as my RT-N66U is getting a little long in the tooth.)  I was able to get 300+/25 on wireless (on 500u).  Wired seems fine.

X1 boxes are TINY, like android box sized.  
Seem to work well though, VERY fast to respond.  Recording work.  Playback works.  Playback via cell/ipad works.
Cant seem to find where to change the wifi network right now.. will ask the concierge when I talk to them tomorrow.

Again, will write a much larger review later tonight.  If you have questions, let me know and I can try and see/check about it.

 

*Edited Labels*

1,081 REPLIES 1,081

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

OLDYELLR
I'm a Senior Advisor

@JeromeM I'm following this thread because I inquired about this service but declined because it would probably give me less channels than my VIP at twice the price and I wasn't willing to abandon my landline and email address I've had with my ISP for over 30 years just to get faster Internet. Given the $150 installation fee, you would think that the tech would ensure that all your other services would still work after switching to this. Keep after Rogers to get it fixed, or you just got ripped off for $150.


Rogers PayGo. Location: S-W Ontario

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

wcs222
I've Been Around

Anybody successfully connected to a 3rd-party VOIP service ... e.g., voip.ms, ooma, vonage (i.e., not Rogers Home Phone)?  If the modem/router has SIP/ALG enabled, then that would be a problem.  I have Ignite 150U and had to bridge my Hitron to connect a Cisco SPA112 ethernet box to voip.ms.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Sounds like the tech was a little flakey. 

At min they should have put the mesh in. 

If the bridging isn’t figured soon I would call in and get a tech out to add it in. 

 

Looks like Ike I am having a bit of a service outage here. Internet and phone fine, but no channels tuning. 

Called in and they were getting 3-4 other reports of the same. 

Tried the re intitalze, etc but no go. 

 

One interesting thing hang with the cloud PVR tho.. even tho couldn’t watch anything here, the stuff recorded tonight while the outage, plays back back fine. So YOUR connection really doesn’t come into play. You could have no power and it will still record your scheduled recordings. 

 

I did did see one thing tho.. one box didn’t want to connect to the wifi for some reason so rebooted it. It didn’t stay there, but for a brief second came up to a pairing screen. Looks like it wanted to do via WPS.  Wondering if that’s the way to connect these boxes?

(and then if so, how to do it, reset the box or whatever)

Though with the wired port, if some has the cabling, would be the easiest with their own router in place. 

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

JeromeM
I Plan to Stick Around
Same here I had a live TV issue, just a black screen with error with XRE03090 that popped up. Spent 30min with tech support but after trying to reboot everything still nothing.
***Service is back on now 12am June 12th***

I asked him about bridge mode as well, he said in a previous release you could update the network in the settings but now we can just "see" the network it's on. The TV boxes pair with the modem using WPS however Google WiFi doesn't support that but neither does Eero so they either didn't have the instructions or didn't want to share how to setup the mesh network. In my mind whether it's Eero or Google WiFi mesh it shouldn't matter. Will keep digging.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

I wonder, if you connected the X1 via ethernet for the first time that its fired up, or if you reset the box and then connected it via ethernet cable back to any router, or perhaps the modem, if the X1 would simply recognize the ethernet as the valid connection and operate as expected, via ethernet.  Don't pair the X1 with the modem or router, simply connect it to the modem or router.  That leaves the possibility of the wifi adapter on the X1 running, looking for a modem or router to pair with.  Is it possible to shut off the X1's wifi? 

 

Might be time for anyone who has an X1 to run an experiment to find out.  Can't believe that this isn't already sorted out and available for the customers.



Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

JeromeM
I Plan to Stick Around
@Datalink

It does state that if Ethernet is plugged in it will trump WiFi, I could try and connect the cable to my router/switch that I have behind the Google WiFi to see if it would still work. If it does the only thing I would need to know how to do is re-set the WiFi network on the TV box.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Maybe if you reset the box it might give you a choice of wifi networks after the restart.  Somehow it doesn't make sense that it would take a tech visit or call into tech support to select a wifi network and that only a Rogers selected network transmitting only from the XB6 would work.  Thinking logically that doesn't make sense unless the firmware options in the X1 were coded as being completely restrictive to prevent anyone from using a router.  That would make Intel's dream of the "Intel" modem becoming the gateway to the home come true.  Not sure that I trust Intel to pull that one off just yet.   Personal opinion, you wouldn't think that any product like the X1would be released in that state, but hey, who knows??



Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Sundog1966
I Plan to Stick Around

The easiest way for them to lock  the Wi-Fi to them would be to implement a VPN with an SSL encryption where they hold the private key and you hold the public on the RB6. In order to connect to the secure tunnel you would need the public key. If it is hard coded into the firmware of the modem and not publicly visible it might be possible to lock it easily enough. you are not actually locking the wi-fi connection for the traffic flowing on it using an encrypted VPN channel that you set up where your holding the private key on the SDN controller. You would have to  do some protocol analyser  investigation to see the traffic and find out what it is transmitting  on rogers wi-fi connection versus yours. The other possibility is they generate a key pair every so often and handout the public key for authentication

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

I'll maybe later tonight give a try with the wired connection..
See if the box comes up with anything different. (as some screens the display will show a wifi symbol, so might show something different?)
Problem would be that the box is set to connect to my wifi.. so would keep maybe trying that?? I dont know.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

57
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Just a quick note to let posters in this thread know that I have found very little useful information in the thread.

 

1. Many people spent a large number of posts complaining about the $150 install fee. We get it, we don't need lots of posts on that topic - one suffices.

 

2. Many recent posts have been discussing alternate installations. Although there are some geeks who enjoy that, why can't we discuss how Rogers installs it and how it works instead.

 

I'm sure that lots of people would far prefer to understand the features of IgniteTV vs Navigatr, etc.  For example, I don't recall seeing a reply regarding the first paragraph of post 10 (link below), although I could have missed it with all the WiFi/Ethernet discussions (which perhaps could use their own thread?)

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/TV/Rogers-Ignite-TV-Installation-Experiences-Questions/m-p/4235...



Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

With this service.. its hard NOT to talk about the internet.. at least partially.
At least in how/what is set up with, what was installed, whats needed, etc.  
Since its vital to the service.

 

I'll see if I can make another thread right now, to cover stuff like that, so this thread can keep at least to the core standard installs, which the majority of standard users will be using.


I havent got 'skip' as a word to work, but you can say "fast forward" X period.

I hope to towards the end of this week, do a more in depth review of the guide itself, pictures, etc.
I just dont have the time right this second to.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

BS
I'm a Senior Advisor

Great idea @Gdkitty

 

In this new world model, it is not just TV and standard installs, although currently, the range of what one can do is limited because this is in my view, the soft rollout that was discussed to go to a limited number of customers after the first soft rollout to limited employees, then to all employees.

 

It makes sense that they keep the options very restricted in the early stages, but of course, there are going to be people who are going to push outside the umbrella of the basic install and layout, because you can't avoid things like alternative monitored security systems, choices to maintain an existing VOIP, bridging, alternative Mesh systems and routers to support server or NAS systems or the preference by some to have the full internal speed capability of their internal LAN's they have put in place.

 

So, yes two threads - one for basic installs - but note, I only see three installs here so far, you are certainly doing as I would expect and evaluating as much as you can and pushing the limits of the system and providing your thoughts.

 

As for the complaints and discussion about install and self install, they probably belong in back in the older X1 discussion, as these are future possibilities, as well as alternative application and casting devices, like Roku or Apple TV. 

 

And the other reality is that for anyone thinking about this system, or has got this system, it is all so intermeshed the thoughts that will flow - what is the impact on Internet, what is the future, what are the limitations, how do I use the phone, TV, Internet, setting up all my devices, how to change the IP addressing, and so on, along with complaints about pricing, once you start talking about your experience, it all just flows.

 

Definitely interesting information so far on 4 installs, and questions of a whole range, some answered, some not.

 

Keep it coming.

 

Bruce

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

VivienM
I'm an Advisor

@57 wrote:

Just a quick note to let posters in this thread know that I have found very little useful information in the thread.

 

1. Many people spent a large number of posts complaining about the $150 install fee. We get it, we don't need lots of posts on that topic - one suffices.

 

2. Many recent posts have been discussing alternate installations. Although there are some geeks who enjoy that, why can't we discuss how Rogers installs it and how it works instead.

 

I'm sure that lots of people would far prefer to understand the features of IgniteTV vs Navigatr, etc.  For example, I don't recall seeing a reply regarding the first paragraph of post 10 (link below), although I could have missed it with all the WiFi/Ethernet discussions (which perhaps could use their own thread?)

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/TV/Rogers-Ignite-TV-Installation-Experiences-Questions/m-p/4235...


Maybe the forums should be reorganized to create an Ignite TV section. 

 

 

Here is the way I see it (as someone who is mostly waiting for feedback from @Gdkitty and others before making a decision about whether to pay a lot more money to be an early adopter of this) - this is NOT just a new TV service. The new TV service portion of this, frankly, is the most boring part of this - you can google and see what Comcast's X1 software is like, either on Comcast or Shaw's BlueSky. 

 

 

Then there are the radical aspects of this, which in my view are:

- the all-wireless (allegedly) nature of this product. I'm in a condo where I can pick up over 20-30 5GHz networks (oh, how I miss the days before Bell/Rogers started handing out dual-band gateways), so the idea of TV going from coax to wifi is a serious concern. I very, very, very much want to know what wired options still exist.

Also, Rogers is heavily pushing the new remote, but... what about for people who have Harmony remotes? Do these tiny modern boxes still have IR receivers? Etc. 

- the new Internet product, which may or may not have the bridge mode option the way it used to be (and which may or may not interfere with the new TV world), and which, frankly, is a main reason why I am using Rogers and not either of the fiber alternatives available in my building.

- the new unified modem thing. That's a huge single point of failure, say, if the firmware has the same bugs that some people experienced with the first firmware releases on the CODA-4582.

- the new home phone product, which seems to be more like VoIP carriers than the old RHP that was designed to emulate an old-fashioned land line as far as possible. I know they don't offer TV call display (awesome feature); I have no idea what the options for voicemail management, say, in the new world are.

... and maybe other things too. It's important to remember that when you move over, your account dies... and is then reborn in the new Comcast-powered world. Who knows what other differences lurk out there as a result.

 

I, certainly, have found basically zero information about those radical aspects out there. It is worth noting that most, if not all, of those radical aspects are different in Comcast or Shawland, so we can't import knowledge from there. 

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

OLDYELLR
I'm a Senior Advisor

@Gdkitty wrote:

I havent got 'skip' as a word to work, but you can say "fast forward" X period.


You likely never will. I have an old DVD recorder with a "CM SKIP" button on the remote that skips 30 seconds per press. Once I got familiar with the different programs I was recording I knew exactly how many presses the commercials needed. But I believe that feature was frowned upon by the broadcast industry and disappeared. You're lucky you're getting it now under the guise of Fast Forward.


Rogers PayGo. Location: S-W Ontario

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

1) According to the tech, he said wired is an option.  I have not tested it yet though.  its on my many list of things to do for these boxes 😛

2) Remote - No.. as far as I am aware.. they is NO IR 😞  That its internet connected, may be methods/apps that could work?  But IR harmony may be out of luck.  it looks like all the X1 stuff (comcasts old boxes and their new ones), are all RF now too.  Seems like the norm 😞

4) I agree.. the single unit, is a little worrysome as a single point of failure. But in some ways can understand now.
That many peoples houses, mine included, is not wired for ethernet.. and even the coax barely can keep a clean signal.  Going to a wifi setup and all in one.. can help eliminate some of these worries.  One connection in, going to one spot, no splitters, etc to worry about, etc.

 

5) other than the TV display, i havent noticed any other differences in the home phone.  Mind you dont have anything weird on it (phone based security system, etc) either which may act different.

 

 

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@Gdkitty wrote:

1) According to the tech, he said wired is an option.  I have not tested it yet though.  its on my many list of things to do for these boxes 😛

2) Remote - No.. as far as I am aware.. they is NO IR 😞  That its internet connected, may be methods/apps that could work?  But IR harmony may be out of luck.  it looks like all the X1 stuff (comcasts old boxes and their new ones), are all RF now too.  Seems like the norm 😞

4) I agree.. the single unit, is a little worrysome as a single point of failure. But in some ways can understand now.
That many peoples houses, mine included, is not wired for ethernet.. and even the coax barely can keep a clean signal.  Going to a wifi setup and all in one.. can help eliminate some of these worries.  One connection in, going to one spot, no splitters, etc to worry about, etc.

 

5) other than the TV display, i havent noticed any other differences in the home phone.  Mind you dont have anything weird on it (phone based security system, etc) either which may act different.

 

 


2) WHAT?!? I actually had included that item as an afterthought when I edited my post because when I googled, every Comcast box I could find seemed to have IR. If there is no IR on this and no other way to control it with a Harmony hub, then I hate to say it, but Rogers and Comcast may have to pry my Cisco STBs out of my cold dead hands. I never thought I'd say that about Navigatr.

 

I'm sure the new remote is amazing, but hey, if I can (and do) control my Apple TVs with a harmony, I should be able to control this thing as well.

 

4) Sure, but... this means that a bug in this new magical unified box takes everything down. Instability with the TV product, sure, I can live with, but my Internet going up and down like an early firmware CGN3ACSMR on a Casa CMTS would be catastrophic. 

 

5) What about voicemail? Is there a web interface to retrieve voicemails? Are they emailed to you? Etc.

 

What I am starting to learn about this thing is that there is a certain radical vision behind it. (Interestingly, I don't think Comcast or Shaw had that kind of radical vision at all.) Wireless, meshy, cloudy, voice-controlled, etc. - i.e. what you get when 50-year-old executives try to design something that stereotypical cord-cutting millennials might find cool. A big part of the questions I, and likely others, have is how well this thing plays with things that are outside that radical vision (e.g. Harmony remotes, bridge mode, etc). 

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

andrew9446
I Plan to Stick Around

Has anyone noticed that the X1 remote lights up when you touch it. This is great when using in a dark room. This particular remote is much easier to use and memorize keys than the older style remote, and its way more intuitive.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@andrew9446 wrote:

Has anyone noticed that the X1 remote lights up when you touch it. This is great when using in a dark room. This particular remote is much easier to use and memorize keys than the older style remote, and its way more intuitive.


The newest remote for the NB3 (well, you could use it with others, but the RF part of it only worked with the NB3), lit up as well.

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@VivienM wrote:

@Gdkitty wrote:

1) According to the tech, he said wired is an option.  I have not tested it yet though.  its on my many list of things to do for these boxes 😛

2) Remote - No.. as far as I am aware.. they is NO IR 😞  That its internet connected, may be methods/apps that could work?  But IR harmony may be out of luck.  it looks like all the X1 stuff (comcasts old boxes and their new ones), are all RF now too.  Seems like the norm 😞

4) I agree.. the single unit, is a little worrysome as a single point of failure. But in some ways can understand now.
That many peoples houses, mine included, is not wired for ethernet.. and even the coax barely can keep a clean signal.  Going to a wifi setup and all in one.. can help eliminate some of these worries.  One connection in, going to one spot, no splitters, etc to worry about, etc.

 

5) other than the TV display, i havent noticed any other differences in the home phone.  Mind you dont have anything weird on it (phone based security system, etc) either which may act different.

 

 


2) WHAT?!? I actually had included that item as an afterthought when I edited my post because when I googled, every Comcast box I could find seemed to have IR. If there is no IR on this and no other way to control it with a Harmony hub, then I hate to say it, but Rogers and Comcast may have to pry my Cisco STBs out of my cold dead hands. I never thought I'd say that about Navigatr.

 

I'm sure the new remote is amazing, but hey, if I can (and do) control my Apple TVs with a harmony, I should be able to control this thing as well.

 

4) Sure, but... this means that a bug in this new magical unified box takes everything down. Instability with the TV product, sure, I can live with, but my Internet going up and down like an early firmware CGN3ACSMR on a Casa CMTS would be catastrophic. 

 

5) What about voicemail? Is there a web interface to retrieve voicemails? Are they emailed to you? Etc.

 

What I am starting to learn about this thing is that there is a certain radical vision behind it. (Interestingly, I don't think Comcast or Shaw had that kind of radical vision at all.) Wireless, meshy, cloudy, voice-controlled, etc. - i.e. what you get when 50-year-old executives try to design something that stereotypical cord-cutting millennials might find cool. A big part of the questions I, and likely others, have is how well this thing plays with things that are outside that radical vision (e.g. Harmony remotes, bridge mode, etc). 


And that will always be the struggle.
They may never make 100% of the people happy 100% of the time.

Look at ALL their cable subscribers, what portion of them have/use a harmony remote.  Even if up to 10%? (and probably being liberal on that number), is it really worth them worrying that this box may not work with them? I mean if they could, sure.. but would it be worth not going with the newest box for their platform, etc, just because it might effect that smaller %?

 

I am not trying to be mean.. but trying to look at this from the more global perspective.
The majority of their users, I guarantee use everything just out of the box.  (Heck, out of let say 30 odd friends that I regularly communicate with, they have their TV, and cable/sat/stream box.. and thats it (maybe other than a game system).. No AVR, no other fancy equipment.. maybe 3-4 of them have something else)

But it leaves the 10% frustrated sometimes.  I normally is in the 10% often.  Had to re-configure my network here again to get everything up and running nicely (extra switch, etc). Took me a whole day to get everything back up and the way it was, all connected, etc again 😛

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions

@VivienM

 

Sorry, forgot to answer the phone stuff.

The phone stuff, was seamless.

Apparently it has to be 'ported', so it is changing system of some form? Maybe?

But beyond that?  It just works, and didnt have to change anything.
Our voicemail which we had before, is still there.. still had the same saved messages, same password.

Notification, etc are all still done via the rogers home and away voicemail page.
(where you set up email settings to send you a notification, copy of the message, etc)

Makes me think with the same back end.. that it may NOT be changing platforms/how it sends?
It may be identical to the type of system as before, its just built in to the modem?

Re: Rogers Ignite TV Installation/Experiences/Questions


@Gdkitty wrote:


And that will always be the struggle.
They may never make 100% of the people happy 100% of the time.

Look at ALL their cable subscribers, what portion of them have/use a harmony remote.  Even if up to 10%? (and probably being liberal on that number), is it really worth them worrying that this box may not work with them? I mean if they could, sure.. but would it be worth not going with the newest box for their platform, etc, just because it might effect that smaller %?

 

I am not trying to be mean.. but trying to look at this from the more global perspective.
The majority of their users, I guarantee use everything just out of the box.  (Heck, out of let say 30 odd friends that I regularly communicate with, they have their TV, and cable/sat/stream box.. and thats it (maybe other than a game system).. No AVR, no other fancy equipment.. maybe 3-4 of them have something else)

But it leaves the 10% frustrated sometimes.  I normally is in the 10% often.  Had to re-configure my network here again to get everything up and running nicely (extra switch, etc). Took me a whole day to get everything back up and the way it was, all connected, etc again 😛


And the 10% is usually willing to pay more and/or is what they would call an 'influencer', i.e. someone whom others in their social circle trust for advice about this kind of product. 

 

The thing is, I don't think this was architected based on the comfort level/preferences of a majority of their users. If it was, they'd be using big, legacy-compatible boxes like Comcast and Shaw. Tech comes in, plugs new box into the coax jack, backend is switched, tech goes home. Much easier to get working right than something that is expected to be deployed over wifi with mesh networking and whatnot.

 

This is someone's idea of 'cool', 'modern' and 'futurist', i.e. how do you convince 25-year-olds in massively-overpriced housing to spend $200/month on a cable subscription. This thing is designed to scream "not your grandparents' cable TV"... and in the process, they dropped 'legacy' features (coax jacks, apparently IR, etc.) until you have a box that looks like some tiny generic android TV box.