Port blocking in business vs residential

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Port blocking in business vs residential

I just switched to Rogers Extreme in an effort to save some money over my previous ISP.  I'm self-employed and do web design from my home.  Consequently, I run a small development web server that houses the development and build copies of websites I'm working on for clients.  It doesn't get a high amount of traffic at all, but it has to be accessible so clients can preview the work I've done before it's uploaded to my server farm in Edmonton.  I also use my home server to receive weekly FTP backups from the server farm.  I'm using DynDNS to keep my domain routable despite a dynamic IP (previously had a static IP).

 

Since I've switched, clients cannot reach my server - it appears that Rogers is blocking ALL incoming traffic on my connection.  I have an SMCD3GN gateway/router and read online that it could be reverted to modem-only mode, which I've done.  But now my connectivity has actually gotten worse as the daily emails that my home server used to send (and emails generated by web scripts on my server) now never reach their destination.

 

I have asked Rogers tech support if their business packages remove the port blocking restriction but cannot get a clear answer.  They only say that they don't block ports on any of their packages, but I'm thinking this is inaccurate at best and dishonest at worst.   Their Network Management Policy states only that "Rogers does block or limit certain types of traffic or activity to protect network integrity and the security of our customers. These include, spam, viruses, malware, denial of service attacks and other malicious activities."  It does not clearly indicate what they are blocking, though, and I believe that to be an unfair and dishonest practice on their part.  They could at least make some of this information clear to help their customers make an informed decision.

 

I realize that having my own server is a violation of Rogers' Acceptible Use Policy and I'm willing to change to the business package to alleviate that violation, but not if I'm still going to have my ports blocked - if that's the case, I'm going to have to go to a new provider.

 

Does anyone have any direct experience with this?  Anyone have the business package and host their own web/email server?  I'm effectively out of business until I can get this resolved.

 

 

***edited labels***

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,612

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

is there any reason you dont want to pay a provider to host your files for you?  hosting is virtually cheap, and for your level of business to your clients, im sure the extra cost of hosting and having 100% uptime will outweigh having your own server and suffering from having downtime.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

I already own the production servers in Edmonton - I don't need to pay anyone to host files for me because I am the host.

 

What I'm using my home server for is to speed up the development cycle - working on a locally networked machine saves me countless hours of FTP, file synchronization, DB copying, etc, etc.  And it means I don't need to have three versions of my work (development, client preview and production) which further streamlines the process from my end.

 

Every other ISP I've been with has given me free reign to run a server at my home and has never tampered with access to same.  I recently switched to Rogers in an effort to reduce costs for my connectivity, and I was also able to bundle with Rogers home phone and cable services (and bundle which I'll lose if I change my internet package to a business one since you can't bundle business and residential services together).

 

So, back to the original question - can anyone here with experience with Rogers' business packages tell me whether or not they have been able to successfully run a web and email server onsite?  Unfortunately, their tech support has been less than savvy and a few seem to have a hard time understanding the most basic elements of my issue.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

I was never able to get Rogers to directly confirm that they were port blocking, but their senior business tech support implied that this was the case when they acknowledged that, with the business package, I would not experience any of these issues.

 

As the Roger's business package was $73/mo for an 8Mbps/1Mbps line, I switched to TekSavvy, who offers a residential package featuring a 15Mbps/1Mbps cable line for only $43/mo.  Despite TekSavvy requiring the purchase of the modem, the lower monthly cost will result in significant savings after only 4 months.

 

Immediately upon activating my TekSavvy account, I saw full restoration of all inbound connectivity, which further confirms that Rogers was blocking everything on the residental side.

 

And, no, I do not work for TekSavvy.  I'm posting this only as a follow up to my initial post in case anyone does a search for this type of information in the future. and needs a solution.

I've Been Around
Posts: 1

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

I ran some elementary tests out of curiousity.  It appears to me that Rogers does NOT block ports but DOES block incoming HTML traffic.  Whether or not this extend to SOAP protocols I did not pursue.  The SLA is not clear on this so I felt I was within my rights to quantify what Rogers meant by a 'server'.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,069

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

Define 'block incomming html traffic'

I am currently running a small web server, for personal/development use only.  Its not a production environment, its just to test stuff, that then gets  put on hosting otherwise.

I have a no-ip dns address (similar to dyndns), that points to my rogers IP address.  I have my gateway configured to forward port 80 traffic, to the server.
I am able to connect and view that webpage right this moment.

 

Now running certian protocols via that.. i am not sure.  Most of what i have done is simple HTML, ASP and javascripting, but all have worked fine.

 

TECHNIALY rogers does not support this.. but it works. 



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

It wasn't that they were blocking incoming HTML traffic - that would have been easier to mitigate as I could have used different ports for my webserver - they were blocking all incoming traffic.  I couldn't connect in via HTTP, SSL, Telnet or FTP.

 

Rogers basically assumes that if you've got a residential connection, you have no legit need for an inbound connection.  Oh, and I was told you can't get a business account at a residential address - you would need to have your residence rezoned accordingly (and take a huge hit in property tax, rezoning fees, etc).

 

The simple solution was to switch to TekSavvy, get all functionality restored and save money in the process.  The irony is that TS houses their equipment in Rogers' racks but because they get raw, unfiltered bandwidth from Rogers they can pass that on to their customers.  It's noteworthy because anybody who resells DSL from Bell gets their bandwith after Bell has filtered and shaped it so the consumers have no choice.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,069

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

Thats just what i am saying... they ARENT.. well at least in my case.

 

I am at a residential address.. on residential service (express).

I am currently running IIS7, with a webserver on port 80.
I am also running an FTP on the default port.
I have not tried connecting a telnet or SSL connection.
Both are forwarded through my router.. external 80 to 80 on the server, etc.

(these are both for my personal use.. web testing, and FTP for uploading stuff from work to home)


I am able to access my webserver/ftp, both via my no-ip dns address and ip directly.

 

I am not saying to switch back.  Techsavvy is a great company 🙂  IF they were available in my area, i would consider it. (though, i now have the rogers unlimited which ends up about the same price as techsavvys..)

glad to hear you got it working, one way or the other.



I'm a Trusted Contributor
Posts: 255

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

The only port Rogers does blocking on is 25. I've run virtually everything (DNS, FTP, HTTP, IRC, etc) on a Rogers connection with no problems. The only thing you can't do is SMTP on 25, or use any other SMTP server than Rogers. They do that for spam blocking which makes sense, but is also a pain in the butt.

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,069

Re: Port blocking in business vs residential

Yeah, used to have a 3rd party mail from a web host, and couldn't use their outgoing mail server.
BUT you could use the Rogers one to send out from it.

The tech I talked to today on the phone actually confirmed it. Was switching some stuff on my home security and needed help re connecting it to the wifi, and did a firmware upgrade on my smc, and restored my port forwarding. I asked him while I was there if any were blocked.
(And surprisingly this tech knew what he was doing 100%! One of the rare ones)

The only thing I have seen from users on here, is the Hitron firmware seems a bit flakey with forwarding.


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