cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Plugging modem surge protector?

lethalsniper
I'm an Enthusiast

Will it be okay to plug Rogers modem into a surge protector powerbar or will I notice any slow speeds? Remembered once when calling tech support they asked me if it plugged directly to wall?

 

***Edited Labels***

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions

Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Power bars usually contain Metal Oxide Varistors to protect the connected equipment from any over-voltage spikes.  They can operate without any problems for years, but, when they start to fail they can emit a large amount of RF noise into the RG-6 cable and power cable.  This can cause problems as the noise can overpower the cable signal.  Its not a typical failure, but when it does happen it can be difficult to detect as the vast majority of users think that the power bar is just a connecting device, without any internal components of its own, which may be subject to failure.  This has come up on other forums, and as it turned out, the power bar was the culprit.  So, just keep in mind that these can fail, and that a legitimate troubleshooting step is to disconnect the power bar completely from the wall socket and connected equipment and run the equipment off of an extension cord for the purpose of testing the theory that the power bar might be at fault.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varistor

 

Having said that, some power bars also have protection from lightning strikes on the cable as well, so, they will have an inbound and outbound cable connectors.  The problem with this is that you usually don't know if the system is designed for 50 ohm antenna systems or 75 ohm cable systems.  If its designed for 50 ohm systems, plugging the cable RG-6, which leads to your modem can result in feedback problems on the cable and reduced signal levels due to out of phase signal reflection.  Even if it is designed for 75 ohm systems, and it would have to specifically indicate that, you might see a signal level drop thru the protector before the signal hits the modem.  Under normal circumstances this might not be an issue, but if you start having problems, this is yet another item that you would have to troubleshoot.  I've run the cable to the modem directly connected to the wall cable port although my UPS has cable ports on it.  I've never had any issues running a direct connection although I can see that in an area where you see numerous lightning storms you would want to use something like this.

 



View solution in original post

6 REPLIES 6

Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Power bars usually contain Metal Oxide Varistors to protect the connected equipment from any over-voltage spikes.  They can operate without any problems for years, but, when they start to fail they can emit a large amount of RF noise into the RG-6 cable and power cable.  This can cause problems as the noise can overpower the cable signal.  Its not a typical failure, but when it does happen it can be difficult to detect as the vast majority of users think that the power bar is just a connecting device, without any internal components of its own, which may be subject to failure.  This has come up on other forums, and as it turned out, the power bar was the culprit.  So, just keep in mind that these can fail, and that a legitimate troubleshooting step is to disconnect the power bar completely from the wall socket and connected equipment and run the equipment off of an extension cord for the purpose of testing the theory that the power bar might be at fault.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Varistor

 

Having said that, some power bars also have protection from lightning strikes on the cable as well, so, they will have an inbound and outbound cable connectors.  The problem with this is that you usually don't know if the system is designed for 50 ohm antenna systems or 75 ohm cable systems.  If its designed for 50 ohm systems, plugging the cable RG-6, which leads to your modem can result in feedback problems on the cable and reduced signal levels due to out of phase signal reflection.  Even if it is designed for 75 ohm systems, and it would have to specifically indicate that, you might see a signal level drop thru the protector before the signal hits the modem.  Under normal circumstances this might not be an issue, but if you start having problems, this is yet another item that you would have to troubleshoot.  I've run the cable to the modem directly connected to the wall cable port although my UPS has cable ports on it.  I've never had any issues running a direct connection although I can see that in an area where you see numerous lightning storms you would want to use something like this.

 



Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

lethalsniper
I'm an Enthusiast
I'm not looking to plug the cable to the surge protector just the power from modem

Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

Yup, understand.  Normally not a problem, but keep in mind to run the modem off of the wall socket if something comes up and you need to troubleshoot the system.



Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

lethalsniper
I'm an Enthusiast
Okay thanks. I just always thought it would affect the modem performance that being said from rogers

Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

If an adjacent protector does not connect to every incoming wire, then it may even compromise what is superior protection  already inside the modem.  Cable and phone companies are quite clear and accurate about this.  Those 'magic boxes' are best not used.  If recommended, then you can say what it does.  Most who recommend those boxes only assume surge protector must be surge protection.  Reality - those are different.

 

If properly installed, cable already has a best connection to what does surge protection.  Protection is always about where hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly dissipate.  How many joules does your plug-in protector claim to absorb?

 

Protection of the modem means a dishwasher, refrigerator, bathroom GFCIs, dimmer switches, clocks, TV,  recharging phones  ... all need that protection.  Informed homeowners spend tens of times less money on the only solution that actually does that proection - a properly earthed 'whole house' protector.  Where the critical factor is number of feet from that protector to single point earth ground.

 

Again, best protection for cable is a hardwire low impedance (ie less than 10 feet) to earth ground.  Most common source of destructive surges is AC mains.  Those incoming wires cannot connect direct to earth.  So a 'whole house' protector must do what that hardware does better.  Protectoin is always about how a surge connects to earth.  Either harmlessly outside.  Or destructively through household appliances - including that modem.

 

Nothing here is new.  Even the Wikipedia article has noted this.  Described is how damage from direct lightning strikes were averted even 100 years ago.  Unfortunately most are not educated by science. Or did not see what  that wikipedia article says.  Many use junk science (advertising) to install near zero protectors (how many joules?).  Provided is how protection from all surges (even direct lightning strikes) is implemented.

 

They were right.  Do not use an adjacent protector. But if you do, then it must be on every incoming wire.   Spend many times less money.  Then have an answer to the question that defines protection: where are hundreds of thousands of joules harmlessly absorbed?

 

Re: Plugging modem surge protector?

WestPoint
I Plan to Stick Around

@Datalink can you recommend a surge portector bar that is within the 75ohm rating that would be sufficient if I wanted to move the modem to a power bar? I have long wanted to move my modem to a different location, but with the limited length of the power cable, I cant do that AND have it pullged into a wall outlet directly. Right now, its using an outlet with my USB HDD but I have many items connected to it that are all using extention cords and power bars around my room just to have them all in one location.


If I could put a sufficent power strip or such on this outlet, I would be able to stop using atleast one of my 15ft extention cords thats running around my room on the floor, and not comprimise my modem or HDD.

 

Thanks for any recommendations you have.

We Want Your Opinion
Would you be interested in becoming a Community Testing Lab member?
Topic Stats
  • 6 replies
  • 16940 views
  • 2 Likes
  • 4 in conversation