New Router configuration

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I've Been Here Awhile
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New Router configuration

I just upgraded to the Ignite 100 plan and picked up a CGN3AC modem which I am running in bridge mode. It feeds a D-Link 825 router which is several years old. The majority of the network clients connect via the LAN as I have wired the house with Cat6 cable and have a gigabit switch on each floor. To help with WiFi coverage on the 2nd floor, I have a second router (D-Link 810 from my son's university apartment) connected to one of the switches. The primary users of the WiFi are my kids with their laptops (usually on the 2nd floor).

 

On the LAN, my download speeds are about 130 Mbps while on WiFi, they are about 20 Mbps.

 

I am thinking of purchasing an ASUS AC68U router. My question is, should I connect the router directly to the modem (which is in a back corner of the basement with quite a bit of computer casing surrounding it), or would I be better to connect it to a centrally located switch and continue to connect the D-Link to the modem? Thanks.

 

 

 

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Re: New Router configuration

Firstly, buy the RT-AC68P which replaces the AC68U version.  This has a slightly faster processor and proper shielding around the USB ports.  I have an RT-AC68U which is located on the main floor and provides wifi coverage for both main floor and upstairs.  With the 250/20 Mb/s service, I see 328/22 Mb/s wired or wifi (using 802.11ac) on a speedtest, so I can attest that this router works very well. 

 

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/32609-asus-rt-ac68p-dual-band-wireless-ac19...

 

For placement you're much better off parking the router in a central location.  What I have done is to park the modem on the main floor in my office, connected via house RG-6 to the incoming cable from the outside tap (located in the basement), and then connect the router via short Cat 6 cable.  From the router, I backhaul the data feed downstairs to a gigabit switch which is then connected to all of the rooms.  Our house has structured wiring which is a cable bundle consisting of two R6-6 cables for satellite or cable, one Cat 5e for data and one cat 3 fot telephones.  That bundle originates in the basement at the structured wiring cabinet and runs to every room. 

 

If you can park the modem upstairs somewhere so that its connected via RG-6 cable and have an ethernet cable available that runs back downstairs you would be able to do the same thing.  I'm assuming here that you want to run the modem in Bridge mode so that the RT-AC68P provides the firewall for the house.  If so, then you need to park both modem and router upstairs so that the wifi coverage from the router will be effective for the entire house and allow you to run the modem in Bridge mode and run the router in full router mode.  Hopefully you might have a combo RG-6 and Cat 6 pair available, or, if you had a pair of house Cat 6 cables available, you could run the modem in Bridge mode in the basement, feed the router (located upstairs) via the first Cat 6 and then backhaul to a basement switch via the other Cat 6 so that you can feed the rest of the house and use the router as the house firewall. 

 

So, there are options available depending on what cabling you have in your home.  Ideally, you want to park the router in a central location.  It will depend to a degree on what other devices you have, cable tv and home phone and how the house cabling runs off of the splitter in the basement.  That might take a little reorganizing to run the internet modem upstairs.



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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,987

Re: New Router configuration

Firstly, buy the RT-AC68P which replaces the AC68U version.  This has a slightly faster processor and proper shielding around the USB ports.  I have an RT-AC68U which is located on the main floor and provides wifi coverage for both main floor and upstairs.  With the 250/20 Mb/s service, I see 328/22 Mb/s wired or wifi (using 802.11ac) on a speedtest, so I can attest that this router works very well. 

 

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-reviews/32609-asus-rt-ac68p-dual-band-wireless-ac19...

 

For placement you're much better off parking the router in a central location.  What I have done is to park the modem on the main floor in my office, connected via house RG-6 to the incoming cable from the outside tap (located in the basement), and then connect the router via short Cat 6 cable.  From the router, I backhaul the data feed downstairs to a gigabit switch which is then connected to all of the rooms.  Our house has structured wiring which is a cable bundle consisting of two R6-6 cables for satellite or cable, one Cat 5e for data and one cat 3 fot telephones.  That bundle originates in the basement at the structured wiring cabinet and runs to every room. 

 

If you can park the modem upstairs somewhere so that its connected via RG-6 cable and have an ethernet cable available that runs back downstairs you would be able to do the same thing.  I'm assuming here that you want to run the modem in Bridge mode so that the RT-AC68P provides the firewall for the house.  If so, then you need to park both modem and router upstairs so that the wifi coverage from the router will be effective for the entire house and allow you to run the modem in Bridge mode and run the router in full router mode.  Hopefully you might have a combo RG-6 and Cat 6 pair available, or, if you had a pair of house Cat 6 cables available, you could run the modem in Bridge mode in the basement, feed the router (located upstairs) via the first Cat 6 and then backhaul to a basement switch via the other Cat 6 so that you can feed the rest of the house and use the router as the house firewall. 

 

So, there are options available depending on what cabling you have in your home.  Ideally, you want to park the router in a central location.  It will depend to a degree on what other devices you have, cable tv and home phone and how the house cabling runs off of the splitter in the basement.  That might take a little reorganizing to run the internet modem upstairs.



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I've Been Here Awhile
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Re: New Router configuration

Thanks very much for prompt and detailed response. Moving the modem out of the basement may not be an option. It does have RG6 cable running into it BTW. So my question is, should I keep the AC68 next to the modem (in the basement) or connected to a switch in a more central location?

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Re: New Router configuration

The problem is the firewall.  If the modem is in Gateway mode, that means that the modem provides the firewall and DHCP services.  Any other router has to run in Access point mode, although in theory you could run a follow-on router in full router mode and treat it as a network within a network.  The problem with that is the fact that any port forwarding for gaming or VOIP phones becomes complicated and might not work at all.  In Gateway mode, connected to a switch, you can run whatever devices you want from the switch as everything is protected by the modem firewall.

 

If the modem is in Bridge mode, then you need a router to provide the firewall services.  The modem will apparently give you two IP addresses with its running in Bridge mode.  There have been users indicate that they do this.  @RogersMoin has indicated that this can lead to stability issues but I've never seen any comments from anyone that support this.  So, what this means is that in theory, you can run the modem in Bridge mode, and run two networks off of it, using the Asus and Dlink routers in full router mode.  They would run separate networks that wouldn't able to communicate with each other.  You would run the modem in Bridge mode, connected to the Asus router via house Cat 6, connect to a switch (if necessary) and run the other upstairs devices from the Asus router or switch, depending on how many ethernet ports you need.

 

Do you have Rogers Cable TV service?  If so, I assume that you have a Nextbox somewhere upstairs.  You could feed the internet modem off of that same cable by splitting it just before the Nextbox.  From there you would connect the modem, Asus Router (short cable) and then a switch to feed the other devices in your network.

 

Somehow, you want to park the router upstairs where it will be the most effective in terms of its wifi coverage.  It sounds like you might have to become imaginative to figure out an RG-6 / Cat 6 path to all of the devices in your home.  Keep in mind that where ever you have an RG-6 cable outlet upstairs, you could park the modem in that location.  Parking the modem in the basement is a typical problem as most people seem to need it upstairs to connect to a router or other devices.  Sometimes it actually works out if you have an office or man cave in the basement.  Your preference should be to use the Asus router as your main router as its much easier to work with in terms of the NAT situation.  The NAT on the Hitron modem is restrictive and causes a good number of issues.  Running the Asus router gives you full access to all of the router settings at your convenience instead of having some which are available to the user and some which are only available to tech support as is the case with the Hitron modem. 

 

Hope this helps.