Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

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I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 44

Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

Just upgraded from Extreme to the new Hybrid FIber 60. I got the new modem  yesterday which is the CGN2. Reading on here it sounds like there is another model CGN3.

 

My question is, which should I have?

 

Internet was really fast initially but seems to have slowed down.

Downstream
Port	1	2	3	4	5	6	7	8
Frequency (MHz)	621.000	615.000	633.000	639.000	645.000	651.000	657.000	663.000
Modulation	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM
Signal power (dBmV)	-10.2	-10.7	-10.5	-11.2	-11.3	-11.5	-11.2	-11.8
Signal noise ratio (dB)	35.417	34.773	35.417	34.773	34.925	34.773	35.083	34.212
Channel ID	6	5	7	8	9	10	11	12

Upstream Port 1 2 3 4 Frequency (Hz) 30596000 Bandwidth (kbps/KHz) 6400000 ModulationType ATDMA Signal power (dBmV) 58.2100 Channel ID 6

 

 

 

***edited labels***

 

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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 928

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?


@hansm0leman wrote:

Just upgraded from Extreme to the new Hybrid FIber 60. I got the new modem  yesterday which is the CGN2. Reading on here it sounds like there is another model CGN3.

 

My question is, which should I have?

 

Internet was really fast initially but seems to have slowed down.

Downstream
Port	1	2	3	4	5	6	7	8
Frequency (MHz)	621.000	615.000	633.000	639.000	645.000	651.000	657.000	663.000
Modulation	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM
Signal power (dBmV)	-10.2	-10.7	-10.5	-11.2	-11.3	-11.5	-11.2	-11.8
Signal noise ratio (dB)	35.417	34.773	35.417	34.773	34.925	34.773	35.083	34.212
Channel ID	6	5	7	8	9	10	11	12

Upstream Port 1 2 3 4 Frequency (Hz) 30596000 Bandwidth (kbps/KHz) 6400000 ModulationType ATDMA Signal power (dBmV) 58.2100 Channel ID 6

 

 


 

Rogers initially required the CGN3 for the Hybrid Fibre 60 plan, then they quietly changed their mind, perhaps due to insufficient stock of CGN3s.

 

If you're using it as a modem in bridge mode, the CGN3's biggest advantage is that it can bond up to 24 D3 channels (18-21 seems to be what Rogers currently has deployed) instead of the 8 that you see your CGN2 using. Other things being equal, this should lead to more consistent performance at busy times of the day.

 

If you're using it as a router/gateway, then the CGN3 adds 5GHz wireless (very important if you live in an apartment building or other dense environment and you have 5GHz-capable client devices) and other things. Frankly, based on my (short-lived) experience trying to use the CGN2 as a router at my parents', I don't consider its router functionality to be particularly usable. I've heard the CGN3's router functionality is much more reliable.

 

Downside to the CGN3 is that it costs $4/month more. Note that the Rogers posted prices on Hybrid 60 include the $12/month GCN3 rental fee; if you have a CGN2 you should be paying $4 less than that...

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Posts: 6,263

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

Your Signal Power levels are bad.  The Downstream is averaging around -11dBmV, it should be at 0 dBmV.  The operating range is spec'd at +15 to -15, but realistically they should normally be well within +10 to -10.  You're only showing one upstream channel as well.  Don't know if you were not able to copy everything but there should normally be 3 upstream channels, possibly even 4 for higher rate service plans.  That channel is also showing a very high signal power level of +58 dBmV.  It should typicallly be in the 37 to 40 dBmV range.  So, you need a tech to inspect the external cable and connectors.  They don't last forever and every once in a while need replacing.  Do you have any other services with Rogers and if so, do you notice any problems with those services? 

 

Do you happen to use any type of surge suppressers for your RG6 cable which connects to the modem?  If so, disconnect the cable from the surge supresser and connect the modem directly to the connector on the wall outlet.  Surge suppressers can cause numerous problem, mainly reduced signal power levels at the modem.  If you use a power bar of any type, disconnect the power bar completely from your devices and the wall outlet.  I've seen cases recently where the power bar generated enough RF noise that it was bleeding into the RG6 cable into the modem, dropping the signal to noise ratios to the point of being a real problem.  Connect your devices directly to the wall outlet if you can, or use an extension cord for test purposes until this is sorted out.  If and when you have disconnected from any power bar and surge suppresser, have a look at your signal power levels.  They should be closer to 0 dBmV on the downstream side and you should see three upstream channels with signal power much closer to the 37 to 40 dBmV range.  If that doesn't happen, its time to call tech support and arrange for a tech visit.  In either case, with or without a power bar or surge suppresser, can you have a look at your upstream channels and confirm for us that you only show one channel up?  Can you also repost the numbers if you were previously using a power bar and surge suppresser?

 

The issue of using a power bar or surge suppresser is important.  If you have a tech come in to check out a problem, and it turns out that the cause is one of those two items, you will most likely end up paying for the visit as the problem is with customer equipment.  If the issue is with the cabling and connectors it will be a freebie visit which should clear up your data rate issues.

 

Edit:  Fwiw, if you do any online gaming, give the CGN2 a go first before deciding to move up to the CGN3.  There are issues with latency within the CGN3 among other issues.  So, yes, faster data rates are possible with the CGN3, but latency issues may make you wish you hadn't moved up.  Hopefully the next firmware release will solve some of those issues.  Here's a link to a summery that I posted on the CGN3. 

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/190...

 



I'm an Advisor
Posts: 928

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?


@Datalink wrote:

You're only showing one upstream channel as well.  Don't know if you were not able to copy everything but there should normally be 3 upstream channels, possibly even 4 for higher rate service plans.

 


I've seen that (only one D3 upstream) happen before for a few days/weeks. If I had to guess, Rogers had to temporarily rejig equipment at the headend and as a result some nodes lose a few upstream channels for a while...

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Posts: 6,263

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

In this case, with the power levels where they are, I'd call it an issue with the cable or connectors.  Because the output level is so high, its probable that the modem shuts down the upstream channels one by one in order to stay within its output power envelope.  I wouldn't think twice about calling tech support.



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Posts: 14,015

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

I would agree. Get rogers out to look at the power levels.
Make sure they check every point.
Street
Entry into the house
Where it splits inside.
At the modem.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 44

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

Thanks. The modem is connected to the cable directly with no surge protector on the cable line.

 

I have had a tech out once before with my old modem rebooting all the time on it's own. He did mention low levels last time but his solution then was to change a splitter inside. The modem still reboot but not as often. I couldnt be bothered to call again and leave work early.

 

I will call them again and ask them to check the outsdie line as well. I dont think the last tech checked that but could be wrong. I max out around 40Mbps on speed tests i've done.

 

 

 

I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 44

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

So I deciided to move the modem to another outlet in the house. MUCH better. Noticeably faster now. 🙂

 

Downstream
Port	1	2	3	4	5	6	7	8
Frequency (MHz)	621.000	591.000	597.000	603.000	609.000	615.000	633.000	639.000
Modulation	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM	256 QAM
Signal power (dBmV)	-2.88	-2.02	-2.51	-2.45	-2.42	-2.73	-2.85	-2.98
Signal noise ratio (dB)	38.257	38.257	37.935	37.935	36.844	37.935	38.605	38.257
Channel ID	6	1	2	3	4	5	7	8

Upstream Port 1 2 3 4 Frequency (Hz) 38596000 30596000 23700000 Bandwidth (kbps/KHz) 3200000 6400000 6400000 ModulationType ATDMA ATDMA ATDMA Signal power (dBmV) 52.0000 52.0000 52.0000 Channel ID 5 6 7

 

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Posts: 6,263

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

Ok, it sounds like you have more than one service in your home. If you have a laptop handy and don’t mind doing some of your own troubleshooting you could try the following just to check out your house cabling. Disconnect your modem and connect it to the cable that comes into the house, specifically, take that incoming cable off of the splitter input and connect it to the modem. Fire up the modem and have a look at the power levels and number of bonded upstream channels with your laptop. That will show what the power levels are at when the cable first arrives in the home , and, prove or disprove the idea that there is a possible problem with either the current splitter or with the cable that heads off to your normal connection point.

 

1.   If the signal levels on the incoming cable are as bad as what you have already seen and you still have only one bonded upstream channel, call it a day, and call in the tech. There isn’t anything that you can do about the external cabling and connectors.

 

2.   If the signal power levels were normal, ie. 0 dBmV on the downstream and 37 to 40 dBmV on the upstream, and you have three bonded upstream channels, I would then go ahead one step, disconnect the modem, connect the splitter input back onto the incoming cable and then connect the splitter output to your modem using a short cable, say the one that you use normally upstairs (assumption of a basement of course and assumption that the short RG6 cable is ok). Again, at this point fire up the modem and have a look at the power levels and number of bonded upstream channels in order to determine if the splitter is ok. You should see a 3.5 dB drop in downstream power through the splitter I believe. It could be as high as 7 dB depending on how many ports there are on the splitter but I believe that even with a multiport splitter the 3.5 dB drop is normally used for internet purposes. You can see right on the splitter what the drop is, as it is stamped on the front of the splitter. If all you saw at that point was the 3.5 dB drop for example then you know that the problem is with the internal house cable that goes from the cable entry point in the basement(?) to the connection point upstairs . That problem could be as simple as a connector at either end, or as difficult as a problem with the cable. At least you will know at this point where the problem is, either external or internal.

 

Having said all of that, I would expect at this point that the power levels will still be down. If that is the case I would also expect the tech to check all of the connectors and power levels along the way as something is definitely amiss. You should not be left with cable power levels below -11 dBmV and a situation where all you have is single channel operation on the upstream side. That is probably your limiting factor. The worst case scenario would see the tech replace an overhead cable, or run a temp above ground cable and call in a cable crew to bury a new cable.

 

Out of curiosity, what plan are you on? Just wondering what you’re supposed to see in comparison to what you are actually seeing. Are you seeing any problems with any other service? Your comment on your old modem rebooting is interesting as it is a possible sign of a cable problem, where the modem reboots in order to try and reacquire the cable signals. I had a DPC-3825 that did that, where it was normally rock solid. Replace the underground cable and it went back to being rock solid once again.

 

Fwiw…….



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Posts: 6,263

Re: Just upgraded to Hybrid Fibre 60 - CGN2 or CGN3?

Ok, you've done close to what I was suggesting.  Must be reading my mind.  Your downstream levels are much better but the upstream levels are still too high.  If you can, go one step further and connect your modem to the cable that comes into the house.  If you do that, while you are there, look for an inline cable ampilfier, probably white in colour.  They tend to mask problems like this.  That test will really show if that upstream issue is internal or external to the house.  With three upstream channels you should see a definite improvement in your download / upload rates. 

 

That test also shows that you have some issue with the original cable that comes up from the basement (?), or with the connectors that are on the cable or with the wallplate barrel connector.  The wallplate barrel connectors should be rated for a minimum of 1 Ghz for cable, 2 Ghz or higher for satellite.  Typically the internal dielectric for those higher rated connectors is blue in colour.  If you do a google search for "RG6 satellite barrel connector" and then select images at the top of the search page you will see what they look like.  That connector is one small piece of the puzzle when it comes to maintaining power levels in your house cable system.  You might have to look at all of your house cables with the idea of replacing the compression connectors on the cable ends.