Issue with Rogers 250/20 and Archer C50

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Issue with Rogers 250/20 and Archer C50

First off I am not even sure if anyone can help me as this may not be a Rogers issue but TP Links support is just terrible.

 

I recently upgraded my internet to 250u and I have the CGN3ACR router. When connected on wired connect directly to the router I am seeing download speeds from 270-320mbs and upload 20mbs. I did not see these at all when connected on 5ghz though so I blamed the Rogers router.

 

I recently got a good deal on a TP Link C50 Archer dual band router. This router got solid reviews and the price was right so I figured why not. I have been pulling my hair out trying to get everything working correctly tonight and it hasnt been an enjoyable expeirance. I have placed the CGN router into bridge mode and connected directly to my computer with an old cat5e cable...download speed is 42mbs/s so I switch to a new cat5e cable and I try again...280mb/s all seems good.

 

I set up the Archer C50, rename my wifi channels and connect my first device through the 5ghz wifi channel. I run my speed tests and 6mb/s, so I run another and I get 19mb/s. I run directly from the router wired and I get 60mb/s which doesn't surprise me because its only a 10/100. I have tried rebooting everything multiple times and running speed tests on another device but I cannot seem to be able to get over the 20mb/s on the 5ghz.

 

Any help is MUCH appreciated as I feel like the upgrade to 250u seems like a complete waste...

 

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,985

Re: Issue with Rogers 250/20 and Archer C50

Hmm, well, you're correct at this point.  The 250u is a complete waste with the C50 in place and if you're intending to run everything thru the C50.  Hate to say it, but, somethings gotta go, either the 250u or the C50.  The problem with upgrading to 250 or beyond at some point is that everything in the chain has to support those speeds if you're going to make the most out of the service that you're paying for, otherwise you end up paying for capability that will never be used.  I understand the point about the price of the C50, but, its going to bottleneck your network if you decide to keep it. 

 

The other problem with upgrading and expecting higher wifi speeds is that there are a good number of mobile devices out there, including brand new laptops that will not support higher wifi speeds.  That is due to the manufacturer cheaping out, building a really nice laptop, and then hobbling it with a limited wifi card.  We continually run into this problem.  Not saying that is the case here, but just raising the possibility.  Unfortunately, if you haven't done any homework and determined what your devices are capable of supporting, then yes, you might be surprised at the poor performance that you are seeing.

 

In any event, first things first.  Determine what cables you have on hand that will support 250 Mb/s by testing each one with your pc or laptop, using a direct connection to the modem, either in Gateway or Bridge mode.  Just be aware that running in Bridge mode, you are relying on the firewall  on the pc or laptop to protect it from external probing and hacking.  If you're not comfortable with that, run the modem in Gateway mode.  I never advise anyone to run in Bridge mode with just the pc or laptop connected unless its for a very short duration test, and then, back to a hardware firewall. 

 

When you have determined which cables support data rates above 100 mb/s, throw out the cables that don't.  What that test tells you is which cables use all 4 wire pairs to support data rates above 100 Mb/s and which don't use all 4 wire pairs, or which are possibly damaged, and therefore only run on 2 wire pairs, limiting the data rates. 

 

Set the modem into either Gateway mode or Bridge mode, connect a pc or laptop and run a speedtest using the www.speedtest.net Toronto or Montreal Telus server, depending on which is closer to your location.  That should give you in the order of 300 Mb/s or higher if the modem signal levels are where they should be, and if the pc or laptop will support those rates.  Just as an example, we have an Acer laptop that will not go much above 200 Mb/s wired or wireless.  So, you really have to know that your test platform will support higher rates in order to fully test the max data rates for your service. 

 

When you have confirmed that the modem supplies above 250 Mb/s, with the modem in Bridge mode, connect the router and run a full reset on it so that all of the router parameters are at their default settings.  At this point, any items such as QOS, traffic monitoring, or any function that requires the router CPU to do anything with or to the data should be turned off.  Turn the wifi on the router off at this point for test purposes.  The point here is to run the router for speed.  Connect your test pc or laptop via ethernet and run a speedtest again.  You should be at or very near 100 Mb/s.  If you see anything that is much less than that, go thru all of the router settings and ensure that everything is turned off, except for the firewall of course.  Please let us know if that happens.

 

When you have confirmed that the wired data rate is at 100 Mb/s its time to move onto the wifi problem.  This is where things get interesting.  The first thing that you should do is load inSSIDer onto a laptop.  This is a wifi monitoring application that will let you see who else you are competing with, in both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands.  This version linked below is the last freebie version.  It doesn't show the 802.11ac networks, but there is a newer pay version out that does.  For $20 US its worth it.  So, by looking at the display, you can determine if there is a wifi channel that is not occupied or, has the least amount of overlap which will cause interference and therefore slow down the wifi data rates.  Have a look at that first and then set up the router wifi using the channels that you have selected.  For the 5 Ghz network, use channel 149 or higher, as the power limits for the upper channels is higher, and therefore the received signal to noise ratios will be higher, as will the data rates. 

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

Set the router security to WPA2-PSK only, encryption to AES only.  Selecting TKIP will limit data rates if that is selected in any form.  Also consider what your wifi card is capable of.  If it doesn't support 802.11ac, then there is a good chance that for a 5 Ghz network, you might not see 250 Mb/s.  If it does support that, ensure that the router is set for 802.11ac, if it supports it.  I haven't perused the manual for the router yet.  Have a go at that and let us know how it turns out to this point. 

 

Can you also let us know what you are using for a wifi test platform and if possible, drill down into the device manager, copy the wifi card name and post it.  With that, we can look for the wifi card specs and determine if that is part of the problem.

 

Edit:  Just reviewing the specs for the C50.  From the web page, "Simultaneous 2.4GHz 300Mbps and 5GHz 867Mbps connections for 1.2Gbps of total available bandwidth".  And then, they go and install 10/100 Mb/s WAN and LAN ports.  So, for any internet speedtest, regardless of whether you run wired or wifi, you will only see a maximum of 100 Mb/s.  If you were to run a wifi server, or set up some test with a couple of laptops or pcs, using 802.11ac, you would see a much higher rate.  If you had laptops or pc's that matched the router 802.11ac rate, then you could conceivably see something up over 800 Mb/s.

 

For the 5 Ghz wifi:

Set the Mode to: 11a/n/ac mixed
Channel Width:  20/40/80 ??  this is not shown in the manual
Set "Enable WDS" to unchecked or disabled
WPS is disabled or deselected  (this is no longer secure)

WEP is also disabled or deselected  (this is no longer secure as well)

 

Having looked at the specs, my personal opinion would be to return the C50 and buy a router with external antenna and gigabit WAN and LAN ports.  I run an Asus RT-AC68U which is 802.11ac capable, and with the 250/20 service, I see 308 Mb/s down, 22 Mb/s up for max observed rates on a speedtest.  Those results are the same wired, or wifi, using 802.11ac wifi with a gaming laptop.

 

 



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Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,985

Re: Issue with Rogers 250/20 and Archer C50

Hmm, well, you're correct at this point.  The 250u is a complete waste with the C50 in place and if you're intending to run everything thru the C50.  Hate to say it, but, somethings gotta go, either the 250u or the C50.  The problem with upgrading to 250 or beyond at some point is that everything in the chain has to support those speeds if you're going to make the most out of the service that you're paying for, otherwise you end up paying for capability that will never be used.  I understand the point about the price of the C50, but, its going to bottleneck your network if you decide to keep it. 

 

The other problem with upgrading and expecting higher wifi speeds is that there are a good number of mobile devices out there, including brand new laptops that will not support higher wifi speeds.  That is due to the manufacturer cheaping out, building a really nice laptop, and then hobbling it with a limited wifi card.  We continually run into this problem.  Not saying that is the case here, but just raising the possibility.  Unfortunately, if you haven't done any homework and determined what your devices are capable of supporting, then yes, you might be surprised at the poor performance that you are seeing.

 

In any event, first things first.  Determine what cables you have on hand that will support 250 Mb/s by testing each one with your pc or laptop, using a direct connection to the modem, either in Gateway or Bridge mode.  Just be aware that running in Bridge mode, you are relying on the firewall  on the pc or laptop to protect it from external probing and hacking.  If you're not comfortable with that, run the modem in Gateway mode.  I never advise anyone to run in Bridge mode with just the pc or laptop connected unless its for a very short duration test, and then, back to a hardware firewall. 

 

When you have determined which cables support data rates above 100 mb/s, throw out the cables that don't.  What that test tells you is which cables use all 4 wire pairs to support data rates above 100 Mb/s and which don't use all 4 wire pairs, or which are possibly damaged, and therefore only run on 2 wire pairs, limiting the data rates. 

 

Set the modem into either Gateway mode or Bridge mode, connect a pc or laptop and run a speedtest using the www.speedtest.net Toronto or Montreal Telus server, depending on which is closer to your location.  That should give you in the order of 300 Mb/s or higher if the modem signal levels are where they should be, and if the pc or laptop will support those rates.  Just as an example, we have an Acer laptop that will not go much above 200 Mb/s wired or wireless.  So, you really have to know that your test platform will support higher rates in order to fully test the max data rates for your service. 

 

When you have confirmed that the modem supplies above 250 Mb/s, with the modem in Bridge mode, connect the router and run a full reset on it so that all of the router parameters are at their default settings.  At this point, any items such as QOS, traffic monitoring, or any function that requires the router CPU to do anything with or to the data should be turned off.  Turn the wifi on the router off at this point for test purposes.  The point here is to run the router for speed.  Connect your test pc or laptop via ethernet and run a speedtest again.  You should be at or very near 100 Mb/s.  If you see anything that is much less than that, go thru all of the router settings and ensure that everything is turned off, except for the firewall of course.  Please let us know if that happens.

 

When you have confirmed that the wired data rate is at 100 Mb/s its time to move onto the wifi problem.  This is where things get interesting.  The first thing that you should do is load inSSIDer onto a laptop.  This is a wifi monitoring application that will let you see who else you are competing with, in both the 2.4 and 5 Ghz bands.  This version linked below is the last freebie version.  It doesn't show the 802.11ac networks, but there is a newer pay version out that does.  For $20 US its worth it.  So, by looking at the display, you can determine if there is a wifi channel that is not occupied or, has the least amount of overlap which will cause interference and therefore slow down the wifi data rates.  Have a look at that first and then set up the router wifi using the channels that you have selected.  For the 5 Ghz network, use channel 149 or higher, as the power limits for the upper channels is higher, and therefore the received signal to noise ratios will be higher, as will the data rates. 

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 

Set the router security to WPA2-PSK only, encryption to AES only.  Selecting TKIP will limit data rates if that is selected in any form.  Also consider what your wifi card is capable of.  If it doesn't support 802.11ac, then there is a good chance that for a 5 Ghz network, you might not see 250 Mb/s.  If it does support that, ensure that the router is set for 802.11ac, if it supports it.  I haven't perused the manual for the router yet.  Have a go at that and let us know how it turns out to this point. 

 

Can you also let us know what you are using for a wifi test platform and if possible, drill down into the device manager, copy the wifi card name and post it.  With that, we can look for the wifi card specs and determine if that is part of the problem.

 

Edit:  Just reviewing the specs for the C50.  From the web page, "Simultaneous 2.4GHz 300Mbps and 5GHz 867Mbps connections for 1.2Gbps of total available bandwidth".  And then, they go and install 10/100 Mb/s WAN and LAN ports.  So, for any internet speedtest, regardless of whether you run wired or wifi, you will only see a maximum of 100 Mb/s.  If you were to run a wifi server, or set up some test with a couple of laptops or pcs, using 802.11ac, you would see a much higher rate.  If you had laptops or pc's that matched the router 802.11ac rate, then you could conceivably see something up over 800 Mb/s.

 

For the 5 Ghz wifi:

Set the Mode to: 11a/n/ac mixed
Channel Width:  20/40/80 ??  this is not shown in the manual
Set "Enable WDS" to unchecked or disabled
WPS is disabled or deselected  (this is no longer secure)

WEP is also disabled or deselected  (this is no longer secure as well)

 

Having looked at the specs, my personal opinion would be to return the C50 and buy a router with external antenna and gigabit WAN and LAN ports.  I run an Asus RT-AC68U which is 802.11ac capable, and with the 250/20 service, I see 308 Mb/s down, 22 Mb/s up for max observed rates on a speedtest.  Those results are the same wired, or wifi, using 802.11ac wifi with a gaming laptop.

 

 



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