How to find cable signal strength reading

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

How to find cable signal strength reading

Hello,

I'm trying to find how I can measure the incoming cable signal strength going into my modem.  I'm thinking of relocating it to another jack in a different part of my house but only if the signal is adequate which it may not be (longer run, poorer cable).

 

When I had a Scientific Atlantic DOCSIS 2 modem, I was able to get into the menu of the modem from the browser on my PC and get the readings that way.

 

I have the CISCO DOCSIS 3 modem in bridge mode.  I thought there might be similar readings if I can get into the modem's menu but am unable to do so through the usual 192.168.0.1 route.  Is there any other way?

 

The other method would be to hook up a cable box and getting the readings through the service menu's at the two different jacks but I'd rather not have to do if I can avoid it.

 

Thanks.

 

 

***edited labels***

Solved! Go to Solution.

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,865

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Have a look at post #12 on the following linked page.  This was done with a CGN3 in bridge mode, but possibly it will work with the 3825 as well.

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/180...

 

If it does work, please come back and let us know.

 

If that does not work, you will probably have to switch the modem back into Gateway mode for a couple of minutes in order to log into it and look at the DOCSIS WAN data.



View solution in original post


All Replies
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,865

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Have a look at post #12 on the following linked page.  This was done with a CGN3 in bridge mode, but possibly it will work with the 3825 as well.

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/180...

 

If it does work, please come back and let us know.

 

If that does not work, you will probably have to switch the modem back into Gateway mode for a couple of minutes in order to log into it and look at the DOCSIS WAN data.



View solution in original post

Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Awesome!

I didn't have to do anything other than do the 192.168.100.1 from my brower with the cusadmin/password login.

 

I think all is good with my 8 downstream channels which range from -3.8 to -5.7dBmV with a S/N ratio range of 37.2 to 39dB.

3 of my 4 upstream power levels range from 39.7 to 44 dBmV.  One of the upstream channels is 0.0 however.  Is that a concern?

 

Now to compare that with the other jack readings.

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,865

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Here is an example of the power levels and signal to noise ratios from my CGN3:

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/176...

 

The target power level for the downstream is is 0 dBmV with a signal to noise ratio in the high 30's to low 40's.  The upstream power level target is 37 to 40 dBmV.

 

Your downstream levels appear to be low and the upstream levels range a little high.  Three bonded channels is typical.  You don't want to see flipping between 3 and 4 bonded upstream channels, which would indicate some issue with signal levels.  Your current levels are within spec, just not at the optimum.  There is usually some minor movement up and down for those power levels throughout the year but as long as they are stable and you don't have any momentary spikes which drive those levels out of tolerances, those levels could remain as they are for many months and never cause any issues.



Highlighted
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading


@Datalink wrote:

Have a look at post #12 on the following linked page.  This was done with a CGN3 in bridge mode, but possibly it will work with the 3825 as well.

 

http://communityforums.rogers.com/t5/forums/forumtopicpage/board-id/Getting_connected/message-id/180...

 

If it does work, please come back and let us know.

 

If that does not work, you will probably have to switch the modem back into Gateway mode for a couple of minutes in order to log into it and look at the DOCSIS WAN data.


The DPC3825, unlike the CGN3, should let anyone http://192.168.100.1 even when it's in bridge mode...

 

(oh how I wish the CGN3 had that feature...)

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,232

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

I would have to agree, that that signal is just a LITTLE on the low side.

You could give it a try at the other location in the house and see if its better/worse.

Especially if worse.. may be worth a test, RIGHT by the source where it comes into the house... it may be that some splitters/connectors/cables may be wearing out.. and worth a tech out to replace some.



Highlighted
I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

I would say for the most part that my internet is pretty fast and I can achieve the advertised speeds (60Mbps) and even higher.  Sometimes during peak hours it can go down to half and I can understand that.  I wish it was a bit more consistent though.  Sometimes, it seems like the internet will get stuck for several seconds or more, almost like a timeout, but then it will go back to be blazing fast.  I usually don't notice it though, for example if I'm watching a video, as the video will load up so much in advance, it can afford to timeout for a few seconds here and there.  But if I'm surfing between sites, and it happens, that's when I notice it.  Again, not frequent enough for me to complain but I have noticed it on occassion.

 

Maybe I will try and test it at another jack closer to the where the cable enters the home.  In my case though, the closer I can move the modem/separate router to the entry point, the farther I actually get from my wifi devices so it's a trade off.

 

I upgraded to the Hybrid 60 after Rogers allowed people to do so with the Cisco modem.  I notice that the Hitron has more downstream channels.  If I'm achieving my max speeds for the most part with only 8 downstream channels, does it even make sense to get the Hitron at all?

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,865

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Now that you’ve seen the performance of the 3825 at 60 Mb/s it would be interesting to see if you really noticed a difference with a 20/4 channel CGN3. I don’t think you will find anyone who will disagree in saying that you should see better performance, hopefully to the point where you don’t have any timeouts. Of course that is also site dependent. In theory you should absolutely see a difference as your incoming data is spread across 20 channels as opposed to 8. The question that should arise is how well the network is managed with 3825s now running at 60 Mb/s. Are the 3825s restricted to a very specific subset of the available channels, in which case you would expect to see slower data delivery as more customers ramp up to the 60 Mb/s service, or are their channel assignments spread out in order to minimize overloading any one subset of channels. That’s the part of the Cable Modem Termination System (CMTS) that we don’t have enough understanding about. Thinking like an engineer, I would expect the CMTS to dynamically manage the data loading and modem assignments per channel, taking into account the mixture of 4, 8 and 20 downstream channel modems supported at each node. How well that occurs is a good question. The only way for you to really see the difference is to give the Hitron CGN3 a test run for a month and come to a conclusion for or against. It would be an interesting experiment, theory versus reality.



Highlighted
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading


@Hwaiting wrote:

I would say for the most part that my internet is pretty fast and I can achieve the advertised speeds (60Mbps) and even higher.  Sometimes during peak hours it can go down to half and I can understand that.


I would not be satisfied with that. In my experience Rogers is pretty good at engineering a network that can still deliver the advertised speeds at peak times...

 

Time to try a CGN3?

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,232

Re: How to find cable signal strength reading

Yeah.. there are either TWO things going on.

A ) the channel saturation, as the others have expected above.  Which is even quite possible with the 8 channel modems now, with people getting faster and faster packages.. (how the heck did we... and some people DO still! live with the D2 single channel modems?)

 

B ) Check your signal levels at BOTH times.. durring a good time, and a BAD time, and see if there is any varrience.  Durring the peak times, there may be more of a load in the area, your house, etc all at that time.. and its possible you might see a BIGER drop in the signal strength.