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Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Dire
I Plan to Stick Around

After 43 years with Bell my mother is seriously considering leaving for rogers phone service. But after doing a little research for her, I found myself slightly confused. I was hoping someone here might have a simple straight answer.

 

i kept reading on some sites about Rogers Home phone, but noticed that on other web sites they would use the term wireless home phone. Is it the same service? If not what would be the difference?

 

my second question is about installation. She already has both digital cable and high speed internet. Would this new service require a technician to come out? She now lives alone, and is quite fearful of anyone at the door asking to get in. Would it be possible to just receive the equipment from a Rogers Store, and allow me a day or so later to plug in any equipment for her. Or does a technician need to work on the box outside for all this to work.

 

any input would be appreciated.

 

***EDITED LABELS***

16 REPLIES 16

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Not sure about the Wireless Home Phone, perhaps one of the moderators or other REs could comment on that one.

 

There are a couple of scenarios that could happen, just depends on the current provider for your mother’s existing cable and internet.  In either case, it would require a technician if the Home Phone installation is the same as what I currently have, which is a fixed landline number running off of a dedicated Home Phone modem.

 

If the current provider is Rogers, then a tech would install a different cable splitter, install the Home Phone cable modem at the same location where the home’s telephone connector block sits, and then cut the existing Bell connection to patch in to the output cable from the Home Phone modem.  That’s only two wires that have be cut and patched over.  The existing phone service in the home would be used in the same manner as with the Bell service.  After patching in the Home Phone modem cable, the existing phone system wouldn’t know the difference between the two services.  You could park a cordless phone near one of the current phone outlets and connect that cordless phone to the outlet.  

 

The other scenario would come about if the cable and high speed internet provider was with a different company.  If it was a TPIA, using cable, then the same scenario as above would probably apply.  If this was provided by Bell for example, using fibre or DSL, then its possible that the Rogers tech would also have to run a cable from the local tap, which could be from a utility pole, or from a pedestal located near the home in the case of underground cabling in the neighborhood.  The connection to the pedestal would require a cable burial at some point.  As that requires a permit and locating the existing underground services, that could be several weeks down the road.  

 

So, it just depends on who the current provider is.  Either way, a technician will require access to the home, to install the Home Phone modem, and possibly to install a new cable to connect the modem.

 

There is one important difference to note between the Bell and Rogers systems.  The Bell service will continue to operate during a power outage as it uses external power supplied by the nearest Bell power backup.  That could be battery system or generator depending on the local system.  The phone will operate as long at that backup power system supplies power which I think would be more than a day or two.  On the other hand, the Rogers Home Phone modem contains a backup battery.  I have no idea how long that backup battery will last but I would be surprised if it lasted any longer than 3 to 4 hours.  I might be completely wrong on that one but, the battery isn’t very big.  So, one thing to consider is the necessity of a wired phone in the home.  If it turns out that this is a definite requirement, you might want to reconsider switching from Bell.  Same goes for VOIP.



Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

The battery is supposed to go up to 6 hours.. 

One thing to remember, is that with either system, you need to have a plain old wired phone to work.  Any wireless phone, or even wired ones which have display which require power, the phone wont work with no power.

I do agree though, that it is worth getting a tech out.

To ensure that everything is wired properly, signals are good, etc.
And that its connected in to the phone system within the house properly as well.

The main advantage of having the rogers home phone, would be that a possible cheaper bundle might be able to be attained, having the 3 services.

 


Wireless home phone.. thats a different beast alltogether.
While yes, in some cases can be CHEAPER than landline phone based..  it does have many more pitfalls.
Its pretty much a cell phone, in a box, which then provides dialtone, etc to make calls, etc.  The box needs to have a GOOD wireless signal to work, often requiring it to be then upstairs, etc.  It will be much more prone to issues when the power goes out, etc.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

My Godfather had the Wired Home Phone (The Traditional one) but recently switched to the Wireless Home Phone.

 

-He kept the same #,

-The monthly fee Decreased on wireless

-Wireless is Self Install - they treat it as a rogers wireless product so there is no tech dispatch for issues

-Wired home phone had a technician install a modem, so it had to be a professional install, not something you can do yourself

-both use the same phone jacks in your home

-not all reps were knowledgeable a bout the wireless home phone so he needed to push a bit to get to speak to a knowledgeable retail store rep who could answer questions and sell him one (not sure how someone could get a job at a rogers retail store and not know what they sell, but thats another story)

-you need good cellular signal for it to work good, so if ur cellphones typically get good coverage u should be ok, otherwise it might not be worth it.



Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

BS
I'm a Senior Advisor

I would add only one more thing to the comments so far - the others have covered all I have looked into on the comparison of Home Phone versus Wireless Home Phone.

 

If you have a third party provider of services, they will actually give you instructions on how to do it and the required cross-over cable verus straight through (I won't try to explain that), a slitter and the connection hardware and you can do yourself.

 

Rogers will send out their techs and do the work for you, and third party companies will do the same.

 

If existing services are through a third party service provider of cable, most will discount your digital home phone connection and do phone number transfer for you.  Be sure to have the outside party do the port of the phone number and cancel service with Bell - don't do it yourself, as you will lose the number.

 

Third party providers will facilitate connection, and it is not necessary for them to involve Rogers at all, as it is nothing but a VOIP set up off your Internet connection, attaching to a VOIP server with all the phone features available.

 

Finally, I would suggest that unless you are knowledgeable of connections to traditional in home phone lines and how to properly patch from the box to your lines, I would suggest a professional install from whichever company.  If you are comfortable with researching the Internet, the company will give you instructions and phone support on self installs, and are comfortable with some trial and error to get it complete functional - example, if backwards on the wiring, you will have no phone services, but plugging into the box, a phone works, you then switch the wiring and low and behold it can work - even many Rogers techs have demonstrated their lack of knowledge, but if they get it wrong, you can call them back until it is right.

 

This issue with wireless home phone is signal strentgh, I have poor signal for cell in my home, so it is not an option, so be clear what your signal strength is like - it is cheaper though for sure.

 

Good luck - let us know how it goes.

 

Bruce

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Dire
I Plan to Stick Around

Thank you all for your insight on this. I just thought it was a  voip box that you connected to your Rogers modem/router then just attached an existing phone, plugged it in and done.

 

 you’ve given me Great information thank you again.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Dire
I Plan to Stick Around

A follow up question.

 

would anyone know if the wireless home phone service is available to everyone,or is it only for regions that don’t have landline/cable access such as rural areas of the country. I’ve gotten mixed signals on this point, and the Rogers web site doesn’t really answer my question. Thank you

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Just took a peek at the site..

When it FIRST came out, it was only available to places NOT covered by wired service.

I am not seeing anything on the page anymore saying this restriction anymore.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Dire
I Plan to Stick Around

Yes that’s the first place I went. It doesn’t say anything about restrictions But on the forum several threads say the opposite, but they are 4 to 5 years old. I was hoping kind soul could confirm if it has restrictions or not rather than me calling up Rogers and asking. Thanks for having a look for me on the website.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Yeah. most of those posts in that time would have been when it first came out, and there was that restriction.

Maybe one of the MODS might be able to come by and confirm or not.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Hello, @Dire

 

I appreciate your queries in the Community. If you are inside our cable footprint then the cable Home Phone is preferred, however, there are no restrictions anymore you can opt for the Wireless Home Phone service. Hope this helps.

 

Cheers,

RogersMoin

 

PS: @Gdkitty - Thank you for all your contribution to the Community. 

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
I can not comment on their official policy because I am not an employee of Rogers Wireless, so I do not know it.

That said, my Godfather WAS a customer of their Cable Home Phone service, thus living in the Cable Footprint (Etobicoke/Toronto to be exact), and switched to Wireless Home phone, still living in the same city, and he was able to sign up and even port his number over too, so yeah its possible now, as to when the switch happened I do not know, I am not privy to this information.


Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Dire
I Plan to Stick Around

Update........

 

My mother was still on the fence about the move over to Rogers. But three days before thanksgiving a garbage truck rammed its way through the back lane tearing multiple houses utilities out including hers. So no phone, tv, or internet.

 

her neighbour assured her that a call had been made to Rogers for both of them. So all she had was a radio to keep her company, and no way to tell her friends or family what was going on.

 

the next day  in the afternoon I was there, and noticed work being done in the back, but only to my mothers neighbours home. I asked the technician, and was told it was only for that home. If I wanted a repair I would have to phone Rogers.  (how was I to phone with no phone service) My brother has my mother’s account information for both Bell and Rogers, so I went out on a search for a pay phone.(finding one is more difficult than finding chicken dentures) after relaying the issue to my brother, he began going after both companies.

 

Bell seemed rather uninterested in my mother’s problem, because after 17 minutes of complaining to them they responded with a “I’m sorry sir”and telling my brother it would be another 48 hours before anyone “could be out there.”

 

Next came Rogers. After he complained to them about the issue and the technicians unwillingness to help. They to apologized, but also offered my mother a reduction in her service fees for the month, and told my brother a technician would be at her house in 3 hours. And good to their word Rogers had a tech there, who repaired everything in slightly more than an hour. My mother was very satisfied with Rogers service.

 

2 days later the Bell technician came out, and seemed clueless. Asking my aged mother to enter her home when there was no need, looking for the “main”which she kept telling him was in the back with the torn out cabling. Then finally getting to the back and looking up he exclaimed “oh you don’t have a drop” he then proceeded to go back to his truck and sit... and sit...and sit. After 3 hours of him getting in and out of his truck to look at the damage and I guess talk to a supervisor her finally got to work.

 

another hour and a half passed, my mother went to check up on the technician. The new lines were in place. He and his truck were gone. He didn’t ask if the phone was working or even a “madame I’ve repaired the line” ,just gone.

 

after that my mother’s mind was made up, she was going to switch to Rogers.

 

yesterday the Rogers technician came in and within 40 minutes had it up and running. If Bell had supplied even a little bit better service my mom would have stayed with them. I guess they thought after 40 plus years she would never move. 

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

BS
I'm a Senior Advisor

Message in this story - there are choices to us when we end up in this situation, and sometimes it is best to just say, it was nice working with you in the past, but not anymore.

 

Nice thing about transferring your line from Bell to Rogers or any alternative is that you don't have do even deal with Bell.  You can expect a few phone calls - tell them to take you off their phone list.

 

Glad you got satisfaction,

 

Bruce

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

DominicB
I Plan to Stick Around

Rogers Home Phone ... why doesn't anybody know

 

I'm sorry Rogers, but if your eMTAs are supposed to emulate or "fake" a landline, they're doing a horrible job.  Just get rid of RHP.  Wireless HP was worse.

A telephone line is supposed to be able to handle 5 REN.  Your eMTA can't.  It is supposed to send out 88-90 volts AC RMS superimposed over -48v DC during a ring ... not 60-ish.  I measured it.

It should interrupt the power on the phone line for 0.8 seconds when the other guy hangs up first -- this is standard and tells answering machines to hang up (and speakerphones, and PBXs to release lines).

My brother ordered it, and I saw it fall back to dial tone, but there was no wink.  When I tried it at the pharmacy, I got dead AIR .  That is not proper treatment.

Caller ID ... one format is dialable with a leading 1 or not.  Does it support Message Type 2, or 3.  What about 6?  Your tech. guys don't know.  Well 1 is mandatory on RHP for LD and you cannot dial loal 10D with a leading 1.  It's not permissive at all.  The switch looks through a local call screening area table to determine what is local or toll.

The battery -- 5 hours is insufficient.  In the US, this would be illegal.  The minimum is 24 hours, according to the FCC.  The old network could run for days off generator power while the batteries would go for 24 hours.  I asked if Rogers provides a longer lasting battery ... no.

Rogers is 5 hrs standby ... think about that.  Your phone will not be able to dial out after 5 hrs even if you don't use it.  What about the ice storm a few years ago that knocked out power for days?  What if someone has to call 911 after that?  I've had power outages more than 5 hrs.

I guess those people are supposed to die or use a ham radio set?  A new cell phone has a standby of 10 days in some cases, and recharging USB packs can extend that.  There's just one problem.

People have strokes and when they do they can't speak their location on cell phones -- sure 911 can narrow it down to a street if they can get your GPS or triangulate -- it takes minutes sometimes.   Not good enough.  I have better standby on a cell than Rogers Home Phone.

RHP is supposed to be a backup for a cell -- a lifeline.

Why do I want it? -- because it can block callers, 911 gets my address without me saying a word, etc.

I blame the CRTC here, but these are easy fixes.  Get an eMTA that does it right, and yes, that includes rotary dial support.  That chip costs 25 cents.  Some people still use them as novelty devices or for nostalgic reasons.  A modern modem can't count clicks on a line?

I can't believe you guys could have implemented such a mediocre service but offer selective call rejection, anonymous call rejection, distinctive ringing call waiting -- but talking call waiting is left out.  Who's Calling is left out.  ANI delivery to eliminate spoofing is left out.  Call Waiting Options is left out.  Voice dialing is left out.  Giving your landline and cell the same # is left out.  We had all this 20 years ago!

Why not offer IP phones if you can't do analog right?  I'm so fed up because you didn't move to allow customers to use VoIP/SIP phones, and your equipment causes the advanced analog phones to malfunction.

Then your technical dept has the nerve to suggest my sets are defective -- yeah, I only forked out $500 a piece for them.  They worked fine on Bell, but Bell pulled copper too.

I had a cell call drop on me SIX times ... SIX ... at home -- gotta get a landline when calling at home I said.  Put three phones in and the ringers stutter and Caller ID is hit and miss because the phones look to see if an extension is off hook.  If it's not 600 ohms.

CRTC says text to 911 will be out.  I'm sure people will be able to text 911 during a heart attack.  This is truly laughable.  People are panicked when calling 911 that they can't even dial 911.  I remember switches were programmed to direct 9911 or 9111 or 99111 to 911 but if you dialed 912125551212 (New York) but dialed the first three as 911 instead of 912 it was smart enough to not send your call to 911 and ignore the rest.

These comments may seem harsh, but, wake up.  Offer a service that is solid, or get rid of it.  911 is serious business.  A phone line always has to work.

Once my cell went kaput -- good luck finding a pay phone.

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

guru
I Plan to Stick Around

Can this be installed and work properly by disconnecting the outside land line wire at the box so you can still use all the phone jacks in the house?  So in theory, you plug the wireless device into any of the house wall jacks and can you can use any of your home phones within your house regardless if they are the corded phone or the portable wireless phones just as long as the box is plugged into any wall jack as the rest of the house phones. 

Re: Home phone versus wireless home phone and installation

Pauly
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Yes it can work exactly that way, but like I have said in the past, you MUST make sure the Dialtone or Battery from the previous landline provider is FULLY DISCONNECTED from the point of demarcation before doing such.  Most houses in the last 15 years or more have a set of modular demarcation jack inside their house so it basically the bell lines can be disconnected from all the existing jacks by a small rj11 phone cable.    In the case of my parents house, the bell demarcation jack was labelled by bell and they had even installed the modular rj11 jack which we disconnected.  Then there was the other jack that fed the rest of the phone jacks in the house, we simply patched the Rogers Home Phone telephony modem into that jack and all the jacks had the dial tone. This works the same way for wireless home phone however once you disconnect the bell phone signal, you do not have to use the demarcation jack to feed dialtone to all your jacks, you can use ANY existing jack in your house so even the phone jack in your master bed room can feed the dialtone to all the other jacks in your house. 



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