Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

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I've Been Here Awhile
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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

Can we setup the 3825 to bridge mode on our own instead of paying $50 for a Rogers technician to do it?

I'm not a techy person, can anyone post step-by-step instructions if it can be done by ourselves?  Appreciate the help!!!

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

The Cisco, yes is relatively easy to change, it's right in the main router settings page.

You should not have to pay for this, calling them on the phone they should be able to help with this for free


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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

How necessary is this bridging thing?  I have a DLink DIR-825 router that has much better wireless coverage than the Cisco 3825 from Rogers.  Both devices had the same default IP address so I went into the setting of the DLink and changed it to 192.168.1.1 from 192.168.0.1.  Then I just connected "Internet" port on the DLink into one of the LAN ports of the Cisco using a regular ethernet cable and changed nothing else.  Now I have 3 ports remaining on the Cisco (which two computers are plugged into), and 4 on the DLink ( which are occupied by game consoles and a Blu-ray player).  Both wireless networks also work.  So why go through all these settings changes when all you have to do is plug your extra router directly into the one provided by Rogers?

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

@tooober:

 

as you suggest, you can in fact just use an external router outboard from the Cisco (or any of the other Rogers D3 offerings) and hook it up as a wireless switch/Access Point.

 

You must ensure that the IP address assigned to the external router is in the subnet of the Cisco, and does not conflict with it's IP address.

 

You need explicitly to turn off the WiFi on the Cisco, and set it up properly on the external router, just like you would otherwise.

 

You need to ensure that either the Cisco, or the external router, has the dhcp services enabled, but not both, as you could get IP addressing conflicts otherwise.

 

And, of course you need to ensure that you connect the appropriate port on the Cisco to one of the LAN (not the WAN) ports on the external router by ethernet cable.

 

Much of the above is not required if the Cisco is put into bridge mode.

 

Not all of the above steps are intuitively obvious to a non-technical person.  And even the more technical amongst us Smiley Surprised has been known to overlook something.


So, when you say: "....all you have to do is plug your extra router directly into the one provided by Rogers...", that is probably a bit of an oversimplification.  The devil is in the details.  If one or the other of these details is not done correctly, there will likely be problems.  As a result, there are quite a few postings here from people who have run into issues.

 

Glad to hear your experience was relatively straightforward, and I hope it keeps working well for you.

 

skinorth

 

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

@skinorth

 

Thanks for your reply.  I've been using this set up for quite some time, so truth be told, I don't think I'll make any changes to try and fix something that doesn't seem broken, but out of curiosity, I have a couple of questions.

Why do I have to turn off the WiFi on the Cisco?  I left both the WiFi on both devices active and they both work, the DLink just has a wider range.

I've never touched a DCHP setting, because I'm not even sure what that is.  If there has been IP conflicts, it hasn't been evident to me, despite all of the things hard wired to the routers and the multiple gaming devices, phones, laptops and tablets that connect wirelessly when they come into the house.

Finally, the DLink WAN port IS connected to a Cisco LAN port by a standard ethernet cable.  I did that because I thought it was something like WAN is "internet in" and the LAN is "internet out".  Would it really work if I went LAN to LAN?

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

@tooober:

 

I think it is good to turn off the WiFi on the Cisco, if only to reduce the amount of radio frequency clutter that you have around you.  If in fact both the Cisco and the external router use the same WiFi channel, you might get some serious signal interference and reduced data throughput on your WiFi.

 

dhcp = dynamic host configuration protocol, and is what gets you your IP address and other IP parameters so your devices can communicate on the network.  The external router will receive the dhcp request first, and will respond and not allow it to get to the Cisco.  But again, it will reduce the likelihood for problems if you have one and only one dhcp server in the mix.

 

Connecting to the WAN port on the external router is problematic in many cases, but it could be that your router takes care of that.  If/when you do connect the Cisco to a LAN port on the external router, you may have the aforementioned dhcp problems.  And yes, it will work if you do the connection that way.

 

I do agree with the "if it ain't broke don't fix it" idea, but we do not always know what is actually happening on the wire or on the radio waves.  So making an effort to do a proper setup will yield positive results, possibly sooner, possibly later.

 

skinorth

 

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

How do you find the source port?

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

@GraceMemme:

 

I would like to answer your question, but I need some context: to what do you refer when you say "source port".

 

skinorth

 

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

Hi I exchanged the old modem to DPC3825.

Internet is working on my desktop. I have 2 laptops. One is working, but the other is not connected.

Technician told I need to pay to resolve the problem. ($49.xx)

Becasue every laptop worked without any problem, I told him the help should be free.

 

Anyway, in my case, do I have to change DPC3825 to bridge mode?

I used the old Rogers modem and a router before I exchanged.

 

Thanks in advance.

 

Happy9

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Re: Cisco DPC3825 Gateway

The $50 thing as because they don't really troubleshoot any pc problems, outside making sure the gateway is working. That fee would e for their other tech support, like geek squad type of thing.

As to your issue, guessing both of the laptops are on wireless? What exactly happens when you try to connect? (What failures/errors)

One option in the long run would be to put in bridged mode , giving you the same setup as before, if you know your laptop worked with that router.