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Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

bis010
I'm Here A Lot

I cannot access my Cisco DPC3825 wireless router. That is , the connection times out. No username/password prompted.

 

A direct LAN connection behaves the same.

 

Ping 192.168.0.1 works fine.

 

default gateway is correct: 192.168.0.1

 

Lastly, our household has used an unusual amount of internet the past few weeks (100G, normal 25G)...probably unrelated.

 

 

***edited labels***

44 REPLIES 44

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

Easiest thing to do in this case is to reset the modem by pressing the reset to default button on the back of the 3825 for 10 seconds or more and releasing it.  Only bad part is having to reset all of your previously set parameters.

 

At that point, accessing the login page at 192.168.0.1 shouldn't be a problem with the following credentials:

 

Username: cusadmin

Password:  password



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

I am sometimes not able to connect to router but when I ping 192.168.0.1 request times out for about 10% of the time.

I did speedcheck and here are the results, you can see how download speed is being interrupted.

http://s27.postimg.org/rfxd0gpyr/Router.jpg

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

What model of modem do you have and how are you connecting to it, wired, or wireless?



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

Its wireless and router is cisco dpc3825

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

It looks like you might have more than one issue going on.  You might have a cable signal issue combined with wireless connection issues. Its hard to tell without a clear delineation between the two. With that in mind, are you able to run a wired speedtest to see what the results are, and post the results from that?

 

Next, can you log into the modem and navigate to the STATUS….DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into this thread. Those include the cable signal levels and signal to noise ratios. Having a quick look at them will determine if there is a cable problem.  Don't worry if they look ugly due to formatting when they are pasted in, I'll clean them up to have a look at them.

 

For the wireless, the only way to determine what might be going on is to load a wifi monitoring program such as inSSIDer. If you load this on a wireless laptop, that application will allow you to see where your network sits among all of the other routers nearby. When the columns are sorted by received power, by selecting the top column titles, you should see your network sitting at the top of the network listings. If it’s not, or if there is only maybe 10 dBm difference or less, between your network and the next one down the list, you will have potential receive problems with your wifi. There is also the issue of overlapping channels which you can see on the graphical display. If there is another router running nearby, overlapping your router channel with power levels that are close to yours, that will also present problems. If this is clear as mud and you need help sorting out what the application is telling you, post a screenshot somewhere if you can so that I can have a look at it and let you know what might help, if anything.   Here’s the link to the last freebie version of the program which can display 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks, including a,b,g and n. Note that it can’t properly show 802.11 ac networks which run in the 5 Ghz region. A newer version is out which does that, and it is now a pay version:

 

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

 



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

Heres that table.

 

  Power Level: Signal to Noise Ratio: Channel 1: -10.0 dBmV 36.0 dB Channel 2: -10.4 dBmV 36.2 dB Channel 3: -10.2 dBmV 36.2 dB Channel 4: -10.7 dBmV 35.9 dB Channel 5: -10.7 dBmV 35.6 dB Channel 6: -9.6 dBmV 36.0 dB Channel 7: -10.0 dBmV 35.4 dB Channel 8: -9.9 dBmV 35.3 dB

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

That could be a big chunk of your issue.

A proper signal, should be as close to ZERO as possible.. with a +/- variance of 10.

With you at -10+ you are VERY low signal.. and could be actually droping out.

You need to get a tech out, to sort out the singal.



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

Looks like you have cable or connector problems. The downstream signal levels should be at 0 dBmV ideally.  Yours are all down around - 10 dBmV.  It would be good to see the upstream levels as well.  You should see three upstream channels with signal levels in the 36 to 40 dBmV range.  If you have less than three upstream channels, you do indeed have problems.  So, at this point you need to call tech support with the aim of having a tech come out to inspect the cable and connectors.  Tell the CSR that your downloads are slow and that your downstream signal levels are at -10dBmV.  That should get their attention. 

 

Edit:  lol....what Gdkitty said....



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

Ok I removed th splitters and here in the signal strength now for Down.

 

 

      Power Level: Signal to Noise Ratio: Channel 1: -5.9 dBmV 37.5 dB Channel 2: -5.9 dBmV 37.2 dB Channel 3: -5.6 dBmV 37.1 dB Channel 4: -6.5 dBmV 36.9 dB Channel 5: -6.3 dBmV 36.8 dB Channel 6: -5.4 dBmV 37.0 dB Channel 7: -5.6 dBmV 36.2 dB Channel 8: -5.6 dBmV 36.2 dB

 

Here is Up:

 

Power Level: Channel 1: 38.7 dBmV Channel 2: 43.7 dBmV Channel 3: 41.4 dBmV Channel 4: 0.0 dBmV

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around
What else can I do, I am still getting those timeouts when pinging the router. Every 10th or 11th ping times out.

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

Can you do the same tests on a WIRED connection? and are you getting the same?

And on another wireless device.



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

http://speedcheck.rogers.com/ seems to be down at the time and yes am getting same reults on other computer as well. Can it be a channel thing as Wifi annalyzer shows 3 different wifi connections on channel 6.

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

When you indicated that you removed the splitters, is that to indicate that the modem is now connected to the cable that comes in off of the street, or that the remaining splitter is still in place with the internet RG-6 cable connected and the remaining ports left unconnected.  Just want to be sure I understand the configuration.  Your seeing an average of -6 dBmV on the downstream and 41 dBmV on the upstream which should be survivable.  Of course, it does not help at all if you had to disconnect a number of items.



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

Its now connected to the direct cable from street as I was not using the other cable from splitter. I have changed the channel to 11 and still few connection timeouts here and there. Can it be a router issue?

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around
One more thing, 192.168.0.1 pings were not timing out on WIRED Connection.

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

Absolutely it could be a channel issue on wifi.  That is the problem with 2.4 Ghz wifi networks.  There are a ton of them transmitting, each one looking for a clear channel which is very difficult to find unless you live out in the country these days.  If you look at that graphical display, you might be able to determine if there is a better channel for you to be transmitting on.  The problem with that plan, is that many if not most routers run on auto mode, when it comes to channel selection, so, clear one minute, fighting with someone else the next.  If you have a 5 Ghz capable laptop, you could look at the 5 Ghz networks.  The problem with that inSSIDer version is that it does not properly display 802.11ac networks.  To see those you need to go to the paid version, which for $20 U.S., is worth it.  Looking at the channel availability in the 5 Ghz range might give you some ideas of moving up to that range.  In my neighborhood, there are about 40 routers running, split between the 2.4 and 5 Ghz range, with the vast majority in the 2.4 Ghz band.  As the channels in the 5 Ghz range do not overlap, it is much easier to find clear channels to operate with.

 

Your comment that a wired ping test does not time out is pretty indicative that you have wifi issues going on, due to interference from neighboring routers, and due to the performance of the modem.  Combo modem - routers do not for the most part have steller wifi performance.  Not that I am trying to get you to spend money, but, maybe the thing to do is bite the bullet and buy a good third party router and bridge the modem, so that it runs as a modem only.  That unfortunately is the typical solution that a majority of people here find, myself included.



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

brararsh
I Plan to Stick Around

Thanks man, will check that.

 

I am getting something Critical in Logs and many many entries, 

Received Response to Broadcast Maintenance Request, But no Unicast Maintenance opportunities received - T4 time out;CM-MAC=60:2a:d0:7b:11:b9;CMTS-MAC=68:ef:bd:86:3e:c5;CM-QOS=1.1;CM-VER=3.0;

 

Whats this?

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

The Modem and the Cable Modem Termination System communicate back and forth on a regular basis to adjust transmit timing and frequencies.  I believe that the modem initiates the request, which requires a response within a set time period, which I have forgotten.   If the response from the CMTS is not received with the allocated time, the modem basically raises a flag, resets and carries on, issuing another request shortly thereafter.  The fact that you have cable issues and you are seeing these is not surprising.  Even under normal operating levels, you will still see occasional alerts come up.  It will depend to some degree on how busy the CMTS is at the moment that the request arrives.  



Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

ichadwick
I Plan to Stick Around

Make sure you type http://192.168.0.1 in your browwser, too.

 

For come reason, I have the same problem accessing the modem interface unless I include the http:// prefix in the browser URL line. But I have no problem with it.

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

LegalNotice
I've Been Here Awhile

I have recently upgraded to a Hitron CGN3ACSMR modem from Rogers and everything has been working fine. I have been receiving emails from Rogers telling me that I have not changed my SSID and PassPhrase as of yet. I went to the help section that tells me to log in to http://192.168.0.1 using the given Username and password; however, whenever I enter http://192.168.0.1 I receive a message saying' "Hmm... we can not reach that page." Any help would be appreciated.

Re: Cannot Access 192.168.0.1

There seems to be a bug in the current firmware on that unit..

 

That after a while.. the web page access for the settings for it.. seem to lock up.

At this point until its fixed, the only real way is to do a reboot.  It should be available after the reboot.  You can then log in and change the settings.



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