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CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

Meowmix
I'm a Trusted Advisor

Hey guys!

So the CRTC made a ruling which all carriers MUST unlock all devices for free that are locked as of December 1st 2017. Any devices bought from the carriers that day forward must be unlocked for free as well upon buying it or doing a upgrade.

Just want to hear everyone's thoughts on this! I like the idea as it's not easy for someone to pay $50 for a unlocking fee and shouldn't be needed to begin with.

Let's stay on topic and please do not detail this thread. This is meant for the unlocking of devices. Thanks! 🙂

 

*Edited Labels*

48 REPLIES 48

Re: CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

Meowmix
I'm a Trusted Advisor
Hello @BS

Sadly some take it to the extent to want to argue / fight for no reason.

In the end i made this thread because the CRTC made the ruling that finally we get to unlock our devices for free and from December 1st, all devices come unlocked.

Rogers and all carriers will end up charging us with another fee or raise the pricing on the plans due to it but that is something we will see within the next couple of months.

Again as u said and i said, lets stay polite and on topic ( To the ones that want to change the topic to something else)

Re: CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

DominicB
I Plan to Stick Around

Folks, what I am saying is I have dealt with the CRTC on other issues and I can tell you, they are disingenuous at best.  This is all a smoke and mirrors game to make them look good and the carriers look bad.

I used to be with Bell (they had fiber right into the home), and the CRTC would use words like "destandardization", "forborne".  Destandardization means Bell could use string and paper cups for my landline if they wanted to.  "We are technology neutral", they would say.  Forborne meant Bell could do whatever it wanted.  We're talking about an essential service here folks.  I had a landline that would drop calls ALL THE TIME, because it was Voice over IP in disguise, from Bell!  And the kicker was Bell was charging the same as if it were a digital circuit landline on copper into a Nortel DMS 100.  It was scattered confetti over fiber.

You are paying the highest rates in the world for cellular service because of their policies.  Carriers can charge whatever they want, but have to due to market forces.  This cost will simply be moved somewhere else.  Your voice/data plans aren't regulated.  When I worked for Bell 20 years ago, every rate increase had to be approved by the CRTC.

So an iPhone costs a thousand bucks -- well, how is Rogers gonna recover that cost over two years if they can't lock you in? -- they add it on to your plan -- that's how.  Contract?  There were never any contracts in the olden days.

You're not getting a freebie or an iPhone at 80% off.  And they can charge the same for a BYOD that you bought from the Apple store -- THAT SHOULD BE DISALLOWED.  That's bonus points for the carrier.

I'm not even sure how they can do this -- they seem to make up the rules as they're going along.  If rate plans can be whatever, under what authority can they say X can't charge you extra?  I don't get it.  Perhaps the law should be, lockable cell phones are illegal in Canada commencing on date X.

Deregulated means deregulated.  They can't have it both ways.  Are you paying less than you did when it was a monopoly?  I sure ain't.  The only thing they can regulate are the frequencies, so someone explain under what authority they can do this.  They let the cat out of the bag long ago.

As for buying a new cell phone for a grand every two years, if people did that with wireline phones, they'd be locked up in a mental institution, but on cellular, it's OOOOOOOOOOKAY.  Man, that's $500 a year.  Now we know why everybody dropped landlines and where all that money went.

Look at what happened with skinny cable.  They obviously didn't think things through on that one.  They made it so I can't get a rock solid landline to back up my cell.  I don't hold Rogers to the same standard, because their wireline infrastructure was never capable of circuit switched calls.  Once my cell went kaput and I couldn't find a payphone.  So, now I need two cells?

That unlocking fee is a drop in the bucket compared to what you're overpaying, and it is the CRTC's fault ... because the market is so cut throat now.

Re: CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

DominicB
I Plan to Stick Around

@Meowmix  Nothing is for free.  Rogers is not giving you that phone for free.  They are spreading the cost over the contract.  Rogers bought those phones from Samsung, Apple, Blackberry and paid for them.

You're on a contract.  Your cancellation penalty reflects the cost of that phone.  The only reason to unlock is to switch carriers.  In Canada, you don't have much choice -- it's either Rogers/Fido, Bell, or Telus.

The only other reason to unlock is if you are travelling and want to pop in a SIM, assuming your phone can handle the bands in wherever-land.

However, this puts the carrier at risk that you can abandon the contract because you can use the phone they paid for on a competitor's network -- unless they can blacklist it.  I believe only stolen devices can be blacklisted.

I believe the phone should be unlocked free of charge when the contract is complete, but by then, you'll want the iPhone17, so you won't care.

I'm not trying to criticize anyone and you'll see a lot of humor in what I'm saying  -- I have dealt with the CRTC.  They were ... aloof over a matter of 911 ALI, which spoke volumes on their attitudes towards protecting Canadians.

Re: CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

DominicB
I Plan to Stick Around

@Meowmix @BS  It's just a PR move by the CRTC in an attempt to boost their image.  Nobody likes them and they're trying to change their image.  There's no reason to unlock unless you're a frequent overseas traveller who wants to pop in a SIM from a carrier there, provided your phone's frequency bands are compatible with theirs -- they always seem to be off by 50 or 100 MHz.

Bell and Telus -- good luck.  You may as well just get on your roof and send smoke signals instead.  I tried Telus once and they sent me a nano SIM instead of a micro.  Bell ... I shall withhold comment.  They don't even do CNAM (Caller ID Name) on cellular and they're ILECs.



Re: CRTC bans locked phones and carrier unlocking fees as of December 1st 2017

Meowmix
I'm a Trusted Advisor
Hello @DominicB

As my family members do travel a lot for them this is something for a win. They like this and thus i wont go disappoint them. For us, we know the truth and see other things.

in the end this is to each their own right. Even if i switch from Rogers, it wont be Bell or Telus. Not even