CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Just got the Rocket Model (CGN3ACSMR ) as part of my new Rogers unlimited 100/10 internet package. Anyway, I am trying to setup the Parental controls to restrict when my two boys can access the internet - or rather stopping them from accessing in the wee hours of the morning!

 

So, I found the Security Device Filter settings and have successfully set the time they are allowed to access the internet.

 

UNFORTUNATELY, it appears I can only set the same time every day! 

 

I want to have different access times on week / school days versus weekend / non schooldays? It seems like a pretty basic request, but I can't find a way to do this. For example on schooldays I want access to finish at 10:00 pm and on weekends at 11:30 pm. Right now it appears it has to be either 10:00 pm OR 11:30 pm for all days.

 

Am I missing something, or do I need to buy my own wifi router (e.g. dlink) which does support different times on different days. If I do need to purchase my own wifi router (shame as the CGN3ACSMR Rocket modem already has wifi!) can anyone recommend a fairly cheap and basic wifi router which I can use to provide internet access to my kids devices, while keeping the CGN3ACSMR wifi unlimited for my devices?

 

Thanks in advance.

 

 

***Edited Labels***

Solved! Go to Solution.

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Hopefully someone else with this modem in Gateway mode can chime in here.  

 

My personal opinion is that if anyone wants better control over the modem functions, the best way to do this is to buy your own router.  On the surface is seems like a waste to do so, but, if you buy a router with external antenna you will see better wifi performance.  You will also see better control over the router functions and have access to all of those functions, as opposed to some accessed by the end user, and some accessed by tech support only.

 

I run the same modem in Bridge mode with a Asus RT-AC68U.  That router and other routers in the Asus line have the same user interface or very very close.  With the latest changes in the firmware, you can now restrict the bandwidth (Mb/s) of each device by using QOS as well as use the parental controls which have existed for some time now.  Something like the RT-AC56U might do for your kids.  It depends on what they are using.  If they have laptops, or are going to be getting new laptops anytime in the not so distant future, those laptops might come with 802.11ac wifi capability, so an ac capable router might be in order.  With the Asus routers, you can also load Merlin instead of the stock firmware.  Merlin gives you the ability to set the Domain Name Server for each device, which you could use to restrict the kids DNS use to the familiy friendly OpenDNS if you decided to use the router as your main router.  you could always restrict the kids to the router, with the family friendly OpenDNS address used, and use the modem for yourself, running Rogers, Google, OpenDNS or any other DNS, if you wanted to.  In that event, its just a matter of connecting the modem and router correctly and setting the router to run correctly as an Access Point instead of full Router Mode.  Here are some screen shots for the Merlin User Interface, which looks very very close to the Asus User Interface.

 

http://asuswrt.lostrealm.ca/screenshots

 

The only thing that isn't clear is whether or not the same bandwidth limitation capability is built into Merlin.  It looks like Merlin does baseline off of the Asus interface at some point, and then adds capability, which at some time might be rolled back into the Asus baseline.  Almost a feedback loop.  So, its not clear from the screenshots and change log if the limiter is built in.

 

Here is the user interface for Asus routers.  This is from the latest router which is the newest Multi User Multi-Input, Multi-Output router from Asus.  Go AI Protection..... Parental Control to see what the interface looks like to set the Web (content)  Apps Filters and the time filtering. 

 

http://ec2-54-202-251-7.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com:8080/index.asp

 

This looks identical to my router except that it has added a Smart Connect Rule tab under Network tools.  This is for the newest router and is not required for the existing routers.

 

Here is the Asus Youtube video that goes along with the Parental Filtering page:

 

https://www.youtube.com/v/IbsuvSjG0xM

 

 



View solution in original post


All Replies
Highlighted
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 2,291

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Good day @RSPALL,

 

Thank you for your post & Welcome to the Rogers Community Forums! 

 

I can totally understand that you wish to personalize your settings in order to prevent your children from using the Internet wireless connectivity at night.

 

The modem offers basic limitations such as time of day but you can certainly install an independent router for more options.

 

@Datalink@VivienM, or @Gdkitty - Any third party routers to offer @RSPALL?

 

Thanks in advance!

 

 

 

 

RogersMaude

 

 

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Hopefully someone else with this modem in Gateway mode can chime in here.  

 

My personal opinion is that if anyone wants better control over the modem functions, the best way to do this is to buy your own router.  On the surface is seems like a waste to do so, but, if you buy a router with external antenna you will see better wifi performance.  You will also see better control over the router functions and have access to all of those functions, as opposed to some accessed by the end user, and some accessed by tech support only.

 

I run the same modem in Bridge mode with a Asus RT-AC68U.  That router and other routers in the Asus line have the same user interface or very very close.  With the latest changes in the firmware, you can now restrict the bandwidth (Mb/s) of each device by using QOS as well as use the parental controls which have existed for some time now.  Something like the RT-AC56U might do for your kids.  It depends on what they are using.  If they have laptops, or are going to be getting new laptops anytime in the not so distant future, those laptops might come with 802.11ac wifi capability, so an ac capable router might be in order.  With the Asus routers, you can also load Merlin instead of the stock firmware.  Merlin gives you the ability to set the Domain Name Server for each device, which you could use to restrict the kids DNS use to the familiy friendly OpenDNS if you decided to use the router as your main router.  you could always restrict the kids to the router, with the family friendly OpenDNS address used, and use the modem for yourself, running Rogers, Google, OpenDNS or any other DNS, if you wanted to.  In that event, its just a matter of connecting the modem and router correctly and setting the router to run correctly as an Access Point instead of full Router Mode.  Here are some screen shots for the Merlin User Interface, which looks very very close to the Asus User Interface.

 

http://asuswrt.lostrealm.ca/screenshots

 

The only thing that isn't clear is whether or not the same bandwidth limitation capability is built into Merlin.  It looks like Merlin does baseline off of the Asus interface at some point, and then adds capability, which at some time might be rolled back into the Asus baseline.  Almost a feedback loop.  So, its not clear from the screenshots and change log if the limiter is built in.

 

Here is the user interface for Asus routers.  This is from the latest router which is the newest Multi User Multi-Input, Multi-Output router from Asus.  Go AI Protection..... Parental Control to see what the interface looks like to set the Web (content)  Apps Filters and the time filtering. 

 

http://ec2-54-202-251-7.us-west-2.compute.amazonaws.com:8080/index.asp

 

This looks identical to my router except that it has added a Smart Connect Rule tab under Network tools.  This is for the newest router and is not required for the existing routers.

 

Here is the Asus Youtube video that goes along with the Parental Filtering page:

 

https://www.youtube.com/v/IbsuvSjG0xM

 

 



View solution in original post

Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Very helpful.. thank you.

 

It really is unfortunate that the CGN3ACSMR  doesn't support different times on different days. This one feature would give me the parental control I need, and leave me happy to use this wifi router / cable modem as my main device!

 

I am guessing that Roger's / Hitron isn't interested in adding  this feature 🙂

 

So, which wifi router to buy?

 

My last Dlink router (DIR-655) was a great unit until it stopped working last month! It's Parental controls gave me different time for different days, and at the assigned time it stopped all network traffic for the assigned MAC. When this broke, I purchased another Dlink (the AC1200 / DIR 820). Unfortunately it was a Canadian version with a newer hardware revision and different firmware than the old DIR-655. I could still set different times for different days, but now it was limited to 1 hour blocks! Also a major weakness of the Parental controls on this DIR 820, were that it wouldn't cut off an existing connection at the assigned time! My kids soon learned that if they started a game session or youtube connection before the cut-off time, it would continue working after the cutoff! New connections couldn't be made, but existing connections continued to work!

 

So Here is what I need...

 

1) Bridging

- I think most wifi routers support bridging to other routers, i.e. my CGN3ACSMR 

 

2) Controls to limit different times on different days for specific MAC addresses

- Half hour interval minimums

 

3) When the cutoff time occurs, I want the unit to not just prevent new internet connections for the assigned MAC, but also to kill all existing connections

 

4) Under 100 bucks Canadian!

 

Any suggestions?

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Is there any chance that the problem is with the power adapter and not with the DIR-655 itself?  Thats an old router which shouldn't be used as a router anymore as D-Link hasn't produced any meaningful security updates for it.  For some reason it appears to be an orphan among the group of routers that D-Link produced over the years.

 

Are you looking for both 2.4 Ghz and 5 Ghz networking capability?

 

Here are a couple of ideas to look at.  Since the D-Link does cut access at the specified time and it looks like the Asus routers only run in hourly blocks, that narrows the field.  I didn't do a wide search, but TP-Link comes to mind.  Of course, the question is, do they cut access at the specified times.  Have a look at the following manuals for a couple of TP-Link routers, and look specifically at the parental controls.  The first one looks like its a little more work in terms of defining time schedules that can be enabled, the second look more like what one would expect these days in terms of defining a schedule and looks like it allows half-hour time blocks.  Unless you can find some comments on a forum somewhere, I suspect that you might have to try out a router or two and determine if they cut the access to the internet at the specified times, regardless of when that access was established prior to the cut-off time.

 

TP-Link TL-WR841N V11    page 61

 

http://www.tp-link.com/res/down/doc/TL-WR841N_V11_UG.pdf

 

TP-Link site:  http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/details/cat-9_TL-WR841N.html

 

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=27_1046_365&item_id=034287

 

 

TP-Link Archer C2 V1   page 85

 

http://www.tp-link.com/resources/document/Archer_C2_V1_User_Guide_1910010993.pdf

 

TP-Link Site:  http://www.tp-link.com/en/products/details/cat-9_Archer-C2.html

 

http://www.canadacomputers.com/product_info.php?cPath=27_1046_1047&item_id=074288

 

At Canada Computers the TP-LINK N300 TL-WR841N  is $27.99.  This is probably closer to the 2.4 Ghz DIR-655 that you were using.  The TP-Link Archer C2 V1 which is a dual band gigabit router is $69.99.  This has an easier scheduling capability as shown in the user manual. 

 

So, what your asking can be done for under $100, its just a question of whether or not the router cuts off access to the internet when the appointed time arrives.  There are also Netgear routers to consider.  Here's a search link at Canada Computers.  You might have to hit the sort by "Lowest Price" to get the listed sorted bottom to top

 

http://www.canadacomputers.com/index.php?cPath=27_1046&bsort=0&brand=0&price=1&location=0

 

 

 

 

 

 



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

No, the 655 is toast... The LAN connections work but wifi consistently runs for for about 10 minutes and then just quits!

 

Much to my kids sadness, I returned the Dlink AC1200 / DIR 820 to Staples when I got my CGN3ACSMR (see previous comment about existing connections being kept alive) - funny the Staples guy said I would be back to purchase a new wifi router because the CGN3ACSMR isn't very good!

 

I want both 2.5 Ghz and 5Ghz but I don't need screaming speed, or huge coverage area!

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 7,005

Re: CGN3ACSMR (Rocket Wifiw) Parental Controls

Have a look at my comments and suggestions above.  Given the wifi capability of the Hitron modem, just about anything that you buy in a dual band router will probably have better wifi performance than the Hitron, which then begs the question, do you really want to buy a cheap router for the kids and keep using the Hitron, or possibly consider going above your $100 budget and buying a router that will do for yourself and your kids.  That is something to consider and possibly by experimenting with the Hitron you can come to a conclusion as to which path might be the better one to take.  When I was using the CGN3, running just the 5 Ghz network, it worked fine and I didn't have any complaints regarding its performance other than the fact that it couldn't keep up to the 250 Mb/s service.  I used a DIR-655 for a 2.4 Ghz access point at that time and eventually retired it.