CGN2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

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I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

CGN2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

I have the Rogers CGN2 modem/router, along with Rogers Home Monitoring, and just bought a new router (Asus) to take over Wifi duties from the CGN2.

 

I read here before (I think one of Gdkitty's posts, but I can't find it right now) that I should NOT set the CGN2 to bridge mode since that will stop my Rogers HM from working.


Should I just turn off Wifi on the CGN2, and use the new router as an AP? (I read I should use a LAN port in my new router).

 

OR, is it possible to turn off DHCP on the CGN2 so that I can use the new Asus router to handle more of the router duties, such as DHCP, etc. This would be my preferred method.

 

Thanks!

 

 

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I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: CNG2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

Let's see what Gdkitty has to say about the home monitoring, but otherwise, my view would be to bridge the CGN2 rather than go only part-way. Running something else as a wifi access point will help, but the NAT would still be done by the CGN2, and I think that's not exactly ideal. (As for DHCP and whatnot, I don't think moving those to a different device would make a difference.)

 

But if Gdkitty says that breaks home monitoring, then... ooops.

 

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,128

Re: CNG2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

Well all depends on your home monitoring setup 🙂

ORIGNALLY, the home monitoring internet, was all done via the gateway.. that it had its own separate SSID just for the monitoring, etc.

 

IF this is your setup.. then no, you cant bridge the gateway 😞

BUT more newer home monitoring setups, use a netgear wireless router, just plugged into the gateway, and works semi indipentandly, only needs to be able to communicate out via the internet period on the gateway.

 

If you have the netgear router setup.. then you are already set.  you SHOULD be able to bridge the CGN2, and install your router.. then plug in the netgear, into that one.

IF you have the old setup...

You can do the AP method.. but really the other router would only do WIRELESS access only.. the DHCP and all routing, etc via the CGN2.

Better bet, would be to call into home monitoring support.. and explain you want to set up your own router, etc.. and get a tech out to set up the netgear setup for the home monitoring.  Then you can switch it over.



I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: CNG2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

I have the newer home monitoring set up with the Netgear wireless router. So if I am getting it right, it will look like this:

 

CGN2 (Bridge mode) -> Asus Router -> Netgear HM router

 

Then I can plug the rest of my network stuff into the Asus.


Good idea re: calling Rogers, I think I will reach out to them anyway just in case they have anything to add.

I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 3

Re: CNG2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router

Another follow up question. After I've placed the CGN2 into BRIDGE mode, is there any reason why I would need to login to the modem? Is this even possible?

I'm asking because when I had DSL before, there were some tasks which required me to login to the modem directly (I forget why though).
I'm an Advisor
Posts: 931

Re: CNG2 Modem/Router with Home Monitoring, using separate router


@Duffman64 wrote:
Another follow up question. After I've placed the CGN2 into BRIDGE mode, is there any reason why I would need to login to the modem? Is this even possible?

I'm asking because when I had DSL before, there were some tasks which required me to login to the modem directly (I forget why though).

Well, regarding whether it is possible - the answer is yes with the Cisco DPC3825, maybe (but much harder) with the CGN3, and I don't know with the CGN2.

 

As for why you'd want to do it - the only reason would be to review your cable signal strength numbers... or maybe the DOCSIS log, if you know how to decipher it. If your connection is running solid, you wouldn't need to.