cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Hey fellow forum users.  If anyone is willing to help me with this, it would be appreciated. 

I am wanting to make a 'bridged mode setup guide', pretty much one thread, which goes

"smc - how to"
"Cisco - how to"
"hitron - how to"

 

And would also put in a 4th section, of the alternative of how to set up your own router as just an access point as well.

As i have general knoledge, i havent done the setup myself on all the models, i am asking for your help/input.  Pretty much just step by step instructions, login, this page, change this, reboot... as detailed as possible.

 

This way we have an easy spot for reference for users comming in to point to - will be requesting it to be stickied at the top of the forum.

 

---

Yes i understand that this shouldnt be necessary, etc.. they should offer d3 modems, etc.  I dont want to get into that in this thread 🙂  Its more to collectively get this together to be able to help other users with setting it up.

Please feel free to reply here, or PM me with the info.

I look forward to your input.

 

 

***edited labels***

193 REPLIES 193

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Gdkitty
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

It's not just rogers, nor could they 'fix' it.

Take a look at just about any carrier which uses gateway devices. (Bell, U.S. companies, etc)

ALL gateway devices seem to have poor range/signal on the wireless :(. Seems inherent to the device.
May work for some people with smaller houses, apartments, etc... But definitely not for all/most people 😞

The above link posted should help you in setting it.
You can also call in and have a phone rep do it for you.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide


@MRC390 wrote:

I'm sure most of you know that the wifi modem that rogers supplies us with has terrible wifi signal/strength.

If you're wondering what i am talking about it is at the link here:

http://www.rogers.com/web/link/modems

 

It's the second one on the list 

(Wi-Fi Modem2)

 

I heard that you can connect or "bridge" routers together for increased strength or better signal. I was wondering if anyone could explain this to me? I have another Dlink router with antenna and I was hoping for better signal upstairs in my house ( The router is located downstairs in the basement)

 

So if someone could explain to me how to bridge my routers together i'd be greatful. Thank you.


I worry that you're confusing two different things, which I will explain.

 

1) "Bridge mode" on the Rogers gateways - what that means is that instead of providing routing (NAT), wireless, DHCP and modem functionality, the Rogers gateway ONLY serves as a modem, and your own equipment handles everything else. 

 

2) Various methods of adding another wireless access point in your house to improve your wireless signal strength in another part of the house. (Most consumer routers can be turned into access points either by using a dedicated access point mode, like in Asus' AsusWRT software, or by not plugging anything into the WAN port, assigning the LAN side an IP on the same subnet as the rest of the network and turning off DHCP)

 

 

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

wayner92
I'm a Reliable Contributor

The other issue is that the natural spot for a cable modem is in your basement where all of your home's wiring is terminated, especially if you have ethernet cabling in your house.  This is probably the WORST place in your house to have a Wifi Access Point (WAP).  I deal with this by bridging my gateway AND I have several WAPs around my house that are hardwired back to my main switch.  But you could do that without bridging your gateway as well.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

TeDD13
I'm a Trusted Contributor
There is no difference where to put your cable modem (gateway) in the house cause usually every room is wired with coax cable. It doesn't matter if you either place your modem in the basement or include extra splitter in the living room near your TV. As long as you use approved splitters (5-1000Mhz at 3.5 loss per output) your signal levels and noise ratio should remain the same.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

That there is no difference is true to a degree.  Unless you have structured wiring, meaning there are two RG6, plus Cat-5e plus Cat3 or 5e runs to every drop, you have no method of backhauling ethernet data to some point where you can distribute it to other points in the house.  It really depends on how the house is wired.  So, although the basement might be the worst place for a wireless router of any type to sit, in this case it might be the most logical in terms of Cat5e distribution throughout the house.



Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

skiboy
I've Been Around

The setting for the uPNP is on the same page as the Residental Gateway function.....

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

wayner92
I'm a Reliable Contributor

@TeDD13 wrote:
There is no difference where to put your cable modem (gateway) in the house cause usually every room is wired with coax cable. It doesn't matter if you either place your modem in the basement or include extra splitter in the living room near your TV. As long as you use approved splitters (5-1000Mhz at 3.5 loss per output) your signal levels and noise ratio should remain the same.

Yes that's true but you seem to be talking about a house without ethernet wiring - that's far too Amish for me.

 

If a house is wired with ethernet it will all terminate in one place.  That is where you want to put your networking hardware especially if you have lots of equipment.  I have my cable modem, my router and my 24 port switch.  I don't want all of that stuff sitting in my living room or dining room which is the most central spot in my house nor do I want a panel with a dozen or more RJ-45 jacks for all of my ethernet cable runs.  This stuff should go in a discreet location like the basement or a closet.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

wayner92:

 

You have a PM.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

lethalsniper
I'm an Enthusiast
Is there 2 ways to use my own router in bridge mode - and with out in bridge mode I read some othe post saying guys have used a third party router with out puting rogers modem in bridge?

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Once set to Bridge mode, the modem acts as a modem only.  You can set that mode your self, or, you can ask tech support to set it.  In that mode, you can apparently get two IP addresses, which means you could in theory run two routers (two networks) behind the modem.

 

You don't have to go to bridge mode to use a wireless router behind the modem.  You can set the router up so that it has an IP address that is outside of the IP address range of the modem.  That way once its all connected and running you can still log into the router if any changes are required.  You would also turn off the DHCP server on the router and allow the CGN3 to issue all LAN IP addresses.  This will ensure that there are not IP conflicts which would be a problem in any port forwarding situation.  Once that is set, turn off the wireless on the CGN3, connect and reboot the router and you would be set to use all of the ports on the CGN3 as well as those on the router, and connect via wireless to the router. 



Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

For your case, you will WANT to put it in bridge mode.

If the routing, NAT, etc functions on the CGN3 are all working fine for a user.. the other method may be all that is needed.

But in your case, you will want to bridge.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

lethalsniper:

 

If you decide to go with bridged mode, I highly recommend the ASUS RT-AC68U router. I bought a CGN3 back in early November because I upgraded to the Hybrid 150 plan and decided to go with bridged mode. A couple of days later, I ordered the ASUS online and it arrived within 2 days. You will not be disappointed with the ASUS. I also have a solution for logging into the CGN3, which was provided by Wayner92 (thanks again Wayne)! Without that, you won't be able to log into the CGN3. I do it every day just to look at signal strength readings and firmware versions, plus anything of interest in its log.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

lethalsniper
I'm an Enthusiast
Thanks. Jimboden

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

How would NAT be with this router on 3 Xbox consoles? 2 Xbox 360 and a Xbox one.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

When using modem in bridge mode your saying I can still use the other ports because rogers give 2 ip address so how woul that work now if I pluged my Xbox one in to the other port when it's on Bridge will my bandwith split in half I'm on the hybird 150

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Multiple Console Support

 

You need to widen your search sources to answer that question.  Have a look at the following page:

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/xboxone/comments/1u03ew/list_of_routers_supporting_2_xb1s_with_open_nat/

 

If that doesn't provide the answers you are looking for, try running a search for something like:

 

router with xbox Multiple Console Support

 

Here is Microsofts forum page for the various routers that are on the market. 

 

http://forums.xbox.com/xbox_forums/xbox_support/networking-hardware/02-routers/default.aspx

 

If you drill down to the manufacturer you are interested in and the model you want to know about, in the top Overview section of each model sub-page there is a listing of "how to do sections"  and down at bottom of that page is a section that indicates Multiple Console Support.  There might also be a separate top section titled Multiple Console Support.  So, you should simply have to browse through that forum to check out what the routers support, or don't support.

 

If you ran the modem in Bridge mode with a router on one port you could put one xbox on another port and it would basically be in its own DMZ with its own IP address, but it wouldn't have the protection of a router sitting ahead of it.  There should be enough info above for you to find a router that will meet your requirements.  I doubt that you will find someone on the forum like yourself to answer that question, running three xbox consoles and being able to do that through a router as you are trying to determine before buying one.

 



Re: Help making a "Bridged Mode Setup Guide"

small911
I've Been Around

i did bridge mode for my cisco 3285 based on Rogers instruction.

the wireless doest not work anymore, however port 1,2,3,4 are all active, not just port 1 active.

do you know why?

Re: Help making a "Bridged Mode Setup Guide"

Technically in bridged mode... ALL ports are still active.

Plugging a device into each.. will actually get you an EXTERNAL IP address on each device.

 

Technially all devices will be 'on the internet'.  But they are also open then out, without firewall possibly, etc.
They would also not be able to communicate with each other, like on a local network, etc.

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Avi99
I've Been Here Awhile

I've been on an unlimited plan for a while, and purchased my own modem.  I use an apple airport extreme so I had to bridge the modem.  This was a couple of years ago, and I remember finding the process a little unpleasant.  

 

Anyways, I'd like to keep using the airport and I just picked up a rocket modem, would like to install tonight.  Can I just call tech support and have them disable the wifi stuff so I can use the aiport as the router, and be done with it? 

 

Or is there much more to it?  I see threads with people wanting to do this themselves, and it seems like there's a lot of frustration involved - which I don't really want to do through. 

 

Any advice appreciated!  Thanks!

 

p.s. my airport extreme is not the current model, but the generation prior.  Would I be better to just abandon it and use the built in wi-fi in the modem since it does AC?  I just get the sense somehow (maybe something I heard or read) that this is less secure since it can be tapped into by the mothership.  I just dont know so happy for guidance on this as well!

 

 

 

***Edited Labels***

Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Datalink
Resident Expert
Resident Expert

Tech support can bridge the modem for you.  Its really not a problem to bridge a modem, especially the CGN3 or CGN3ACR, just a matter of disabling the Residential Gateway function.  After that, the modem will reboot into Bridge mode.  To return to Gateway mode, all you have to do is depress the reset button at the back of the modem for 30 seconds and release.   The modem will then reboot into Gateway mode after running a factory reset.  All of the functions will be reset back to factory default values, including modem password, and network names and passphrases.

 

When you set the modem into Bridge mode, you should reboot, and possibly reset your router back to factory defaults and then reset the parameters as required.  To set Bridge mode on the CGN3, and probably the CGN3ACR, log into the modem, navigate to BASIC.....GATEWAY FUNCTION, and disable the Residential Gateway Function.  Save the settings, which should be followed by an automatic reboot into Gateway mode.

 

As for abandoning your router for the 802.11ac functionality in the modem, I would suggest trying an experiment to see if you are satisfied with the wifi performance of the modem.   If it works out, keep it running in that configuration, if not, use your own router. 

 

It is possible to run the modem in Gateway mode, use the 5 Ghz 802.11ac functionality and also run the airport extreme as well for a 2.4 Ghz network.  It would require setting an IP address in the airport extreme  and turning off the DHCP server functionality in the airport extreme.  After that, the modem then handles all of the LAN IP addresses.



Re: Bridge Mode Setup Guide

Avi99
I've Been Here Awhile

Thanks a million for answering my question.  Went into the modem and changed the wireless channels to be off and disabled gateway. I think I am up and running, but my only issue now is speed. 

 

With the extreme plan I was on (not fibre) I was getting about 50mb download and 4 up.  Now I am getting 27-30 down and 10 up.  Supposed to be getting 100 down. 

 

Everything rebooted - still much slower than it should be.  I didn't really expect it to be faster than 50 down just because my extreme plan was rated for higher speed than what I was getting, so I just expected the bottlenecks that I have (older wi fi protocol is my guess) to keep the speed down at about the same level.  But this is unexpectedly worse.  😞

We Want Your Opinion
Would you be interested in becoming a Community Testing Lab member?
Topic Stats