Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

Need Help?

That's what we're here for! The goal of the Rogers Community is to help you find answers on everything Rogers. Can't find what you're looking for? Just ask!
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Reply
Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

I updated my internet yesterday to the new 250 bundle and installed the hitron modem. 

 

The problem i have is with the modem hooked up my cable TV box (small SD one for basic cable) dies.  There is some sort of bandwith conflict i am guessing, if i disconnect the internet cable modem the cable TV start working again for the box. 

 

 

 

***Edited Labels***

Solved! Go to Solution.

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

Found the problem, its a 4 port switch and the "In" line from the street was run into one of the "out" ports on the splitter Apparently the old modem didn't have a problem with that but the new one does, now that its properly wires it appears to be working properly. thanks for all of the help, i appreciate it.

View solution in original post


All Replies
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,985

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

There would be no difference between your old modem and the new modem in terms of the signal levels if the cabling is ok.  The first thing that comes to mind is to check the RG-6 cable that connects to the modem.  Have a look at the end connector and ensure that the copper center core is straight and will not bend towards the outer connector that screws into the modem.  If it does, it will ground out the copper conductor, dropping your signal levels to nothing.  So, ensure that the center copper conductor remains straight as the cable is connected to the modem. 

 

With the cable connected, log into the modem, navigate to the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into this thread.  Those are the cable signal levels and signal to noise ratios, which will show if there is a cable signal problem. 



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

no such luck, even tried changing cables and splitters. As soon as a cable connects from the splitter to the cable modem the TV stops working. Even if the internet modem doesn't have power
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 14,246

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

My guess would be a short in the splitter then? That its shorting out when there is any draw on it.



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

Tried changing the splitter, this also worked fine until i got the new cable modem. I can't see there being a short in the modem though since the interent is working fine.
Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,985

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

Anything is possible when it comes to electronic equipment.  With that in mind, and with everything connected, can you log into the modem, navigate to the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN page, copy the downstream and upstream tables and paste them into this thread.  At this point I'm curious as to what those levels might show.  Are you using a 2 port splitter which has -3.5 indicated on both output ports?



Highlighted
I've Been Here Awhile
Posts: 4

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

Found the problem, its a 4 port switch and the "In" line from the street was run into one of the "out" ports on the splitter Apparently the old modem didn't have a problem with that but the new one does, now that its properly wires it appears to be working properly. thanks for all of the help, i appreciate it.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,985

Re: Basic Cable Box dies with Hitron Modem Hooked Up

If you have 4 modems, ie, home phone, cable TV, Internet, then a 4 port splitter might make sense.  If you look at the splitter, the output ports will be marked, most likely -7.5, as in -7.5 dB drop from the input signal level.  If you have enough signal excess above 0 dBmV to start with, that -7,5 dB drop might not be a problem, but if your signal level to start with is below 0 dBmV, then you could run into issues with the internet modem.  This is where creativity on the tech's part comes into play, either change the external cable and connectors to bring the signal levels up to where they should be, or, use a combination of splitters to drop the level to the internet modem by the least amount possible, or a combination of both.  If you only have two modems in use, then you should switch to a two port splitter as the drop on that splitter is only -3.5 dB.  In general, you usually match the number of modems to the number of ports on the splitters, with a little creativity thrown in.  You don't want to leave ports unused, as that usually means that the splitter has more ports than you need and it will drop the signal levels more than is normally desired.