Note 3 wifi ac connection

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Note 3 wifi ac connection

Just wondering if anyone here has rogers 250u home internet and what diwnload speed you are getting on note 3 wifi ac. The max i am getting is around 100-110

 

 

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Re: Note 3 wifi ac connection

Here are some facts and figures that might help explain the data rates that you are seeing.  First here's a review of the Note 3 that contains some interesting and relevant info.  

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7376/samsung-galaxy-note-3-review/7

From that review comes the following:  "BCM4339 is still a single spatial stream part with support for 802.11a/b/g/n/ac, and on 802.11ac support for up to 80 MHz channels with 256QAM under MCS9, for a PHY rate of 433.3 Mbps, which is what we’ve seen before with 4335"

What that means is that the Broadcom DCM4339 chip only supports one data stream, using one single antenna on the phone, between the router and the phone.  Looking up the chip on the Broadcom site indicates that the chip supports dual data streams which requires two antenna, but the review indicates the presence of a single wifi antenna only.  

https://www.broadcom.com/products/wireless-connectivity/wireless-lan/bcm4339

Ok, so what does all of that techno-babble translate to?  If you look at the following chart, which lays out the gross data rates between devices, you can see the various transfer rates that are permitted under various wifi channel bandwidths.  The amber colour rates are the original 802.11n rates, and the blue rates are the result of adding the 802.11ac capabilities to the chart.

http://mcsindex.com/

If you look down the right hand side of the chart, to the Modulation and Coding Scheme numbers for 802.11ac, and follow it down to the first incidence of "9" and then go left to the 80 Mhz columns, that is the max gross transfer rates allowed for MCS 9 using 256 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) encoding.  To determine what you would see for a speedtest, multiply those numbers by 5/6 as shown further left in the chart, next to the 256 QAM.  That gives you a max rate of 325 or 361 Mb/s.  So why wouldn't you see those rates on a speedtest?

To further muddy the waters, the Hitron modem has its own limitations.  It doesn't do MCS 8 or 9, so those two lines are out of the picture, meaning that the max data rate drops, or, moves up the chart.  The modem also does not receive the short guard interval between the modem and device, so the entire vertical column indicated by (GI=400ns) is taken out as well, leaving you with the left hand 80 Mhz column, with a spatial stream index of 1 as shown on the chart.  The spatial stream limitation of 1 is due to the presence of the single wifi antenna on the phone.  

So, looking at those numbers, there is still a fairly high range.  So, why aren't those numbers achievable?  Simply put, on wifi, the Hitron does not keep up to the max data rates available through your plan.  For what ever reason, it simply isn't as capable of hitting wifi data rates that are easily achieved by third party routers.  Looking at the Wifi Alliance report for the modem, the data indicates 802.11ac certification, but doesn't indicate if in fact the modem supports 80 Mhz wide channels.  If it doesn't that would really limit the capabilities under 802.11ac operation.  

If you bring up the same display on your phone, as is shown on the review, and look at the  Link speed, you should be able to match the link speed to one of the speeds as shown in the charts left hand 80 Mhz column, if in fact the phone is actually using an 80 Mhz channel.  I suspect, from practical experience in my neighborhood that running a 80 Mhz wide channel would be very difficult, and most likely, you are using a 40 Mhz wide channel.  By matching the link speed with one of the rates shown on the chart within the "1" Spatial Stream group, you can calculate the max theoretical rates you would see on a speed test.  To further muddy the waters, throw in any interference from neighboring modems and routers and your data rate drops even more, so, seeing what you're indicating isn't a huge surprise for single antenna operation.  

To see what other modems and routers are running nearby, you can load inSSIDer on a laptop and have a look at the graphical display.  The version linked below will display both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  It doesn't show 802.11ac networks, but there is a newer pay version out now that does.  If you use 802.11ac, its worth the $20 US to purchase.  It will run on a normal 802.11n laptop, and reads the transmit headers to determine what networks are running, and their operating modes and will display both n and ac networks on the display.

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

So, can you do anything about it?  In the short term, you can change the 5 Ghz channel to 149 or higher as the allowable power output levels for those channels is higher, which can translate to better signal levels and signal to noise ratios which then translates to higher data rates.  If 802.11ac is something that you want to take advantage of, then you would have to purchase a router that will fully support 802.11ac.  For comparisons sake, running a CGN3 at the time, the best I would see from a 802.11n connection to a gaming laptop on a 5 Ghz network was 200 Mb/s.  Running a CGN3ACSMR in Bridge mode with an Asus RT-AC68U, with the same gaming laptop, I will see 328 Mb/s wired or wifi.  The laptop connects at 1300 Mb/s via 802.11ac and sees the max data rate available with the 250 Mb/s plan, running wired or wifi.  

Hope this helps to explain the data rates.  If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.




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Highlighted
Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 6,944

Re: Note 3 wifi ac connection

Here are some facts and figures that might help explain the data rates that you are seeing.  First here's a review of the Note 3 that contains some interesting and relevant info.  

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7376/samsung-galaxy-note-3-review/7

From that review comes the following:  "BCM4339 is still a single spatial stream part with support for 802.11a/b/g/n/ac, and on 802.11ac support for up to 80 MHz channels with 256QAM under MCS9, for a PHY rate of 433.3 Mbps, which is what we’ve seen before with 4335"

What that means is that the Broadcom DCM4339 chip only supports one data stream, using one single antenna on the phone, between the router and the phone.  Looking up the chip on the Broadcom site indicates that the chip supports dual data streams which requires two antenna, but the review indicates the presence of a single wifi antenna only.  

https://www.broadcom.com/products/wireless-connectivity/wireless-lan/bcm4339

Ok, so what does all of that techno-babble translate to?  If you look at the following chart, which lays out the gross data rates between devices, you can see the various transfer rates that are permitted under various wifi channel bandwidths.  The amber colour rates are the original 802.11n rates, and the blue rates are the result of adding the 802.11ac capabilities to the chart.

http://mcsindex.com/

If you look down the right hand side of the chart, to the Modulation and Coding Scheme numbers for 802.11ac, and follow it down to the first incidence of "9" and then go left to the 80 Mhz columns, that is the max gross transfer rates allowed for MCS 9 using 256 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) encoding.  To determine what you would see for a speedtest, multiply those numbers by 5/6 as shown further left in the chart, next to the 256 QAM.  That gives you a max rate of 325 or 361 Mb/s.  So why wouldn't you see those rates on a speedtest?

To further muddy the waters, the Hitron modem has its own limitations.  It doesn't do MCS 8 or 9, so those two lines are out of the picture, meaning that the max data rate drops, or, moves up the chart.  The modem also does not receive the short guard interval between the modem and device, so the entire vertical column indicated by (GI=400ns) is taken out as well, leaving you with the left hand 80 Mhz column, with a spatial stream index of 1 as shown on the chart.  The spatial stream limitation of 1 is due to the presence of the single wifi antenna on the phone.  

So, looking at those numbers, there is still a fairly high range.  So, why aren't those numbers achievable?  Simply put, on wifi, the Hitron does not keep up to the max data rates available through your plan.  For what ever reason, it simply isn't as capable of hitting wifi data rates that are easily achieved by third party routers.  Looking at the Wifi Alliance report for the modem, the data indicates 802.11ac certification, but doesn't indicate if in fact the modem supports 80 Mhz wide channels.  If it doesn't that would really limit the capabilities under 802.11ac operation.  

If you bring up the same display on your phone, as is shown on the review, and look at the  Link speed, you should be able to match the link speed to one of the speeds as shown in the charts left hand 80 Mhz column, if in fact the phone is actually using an 80 Mhz channel.  I suspect, from practical experience in my neighborhood that running a 80 Mhz wide channel would be very difficult, and most likely, you are using a 40 Mhz wide channel.  By matching the link speed with one of the rates shown on the chart within the "1" Spatial Stream group, you can calculate the max theoretical rates you would see on a speed test.  To further muddy the waters, throw in any interference from neighboring modems and routers and your data rate drops even more, so, seeing what you're indicating isn't a huge surprise for single antenna operation.  

To see what other modems and routers are running nearby, you can load inSSIDer on a laptop and have a look at the graphical display.  The version linked below will display both 2.4 and 5 Ghz networks.  It doesn't show 802.11ac networks, but there is a newer pay version out now that does.  If you use 802.11ac, its worth the $20 US to purchase.  It will run on a normal 802.11n laptop, and reads the transmit headers to determine what networks are running, and their operating modes and will display both n and ac networks on the display.

http://www.techspot.com/downloads/5936-inssider.html

So, can you do anything about it?  In the short term, you can change the 5 Ghz channel to 149 or higher as the allowable power output levels for those channels is higher, which can translate to better signal levels and signal to noise ratios which then translates to higher data rates.  If 802.11ac is something that you want to take advantage of, then you would have to purchase a router that will fully support 802.11ac.  For comparisons sake, running a CGN3 at the time, the best I would see from a 802.11n connection to a gaming laptop on a 5 Ghz network was 200 Mb/s.  Running a CGN3ACSMR in Bridge mode with an Asus RT-AC68U, with the same gaming laptop, I will see 328 Mb/s wired or wifi.  The laptop connects at 1300 Mb/s via 802.11ac and sees the max data rate available with the 250 Mb/s plan, running wired or wifi.  

Hope this helps to explain the data rates.  If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask.




View solution in original post