splitting cable

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I've Been Around
Posts: 1

splitting cable

I have a few cable outlets throughout my house. I would like to take the cable that runs specifically to my family room and connects to my Nextbox PVR and split this to add on a modem/router. Is this possible? What type of splitter can I use? Do I need a signal amplifier? Any help would be appreciated. 

 

Thank you. 

 

 

 

 

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Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 13,354

Re: splitting cable

I would be leary doing this.. only reason is.. every time you put in a splitter, you are REDUCING singal strength usually.. which could then have bad performance wise, on both the cable box and the modem.

I would give rogers and call and tell them you want to move the modem and need to have a tech out to make sure that the signal is ok in the location.

The tech can install a boster or the RIGHT splitters if need be (there are WRONG splitters which can omit certain frequency ranges, etc).  If you have say an open ceiling basement, they may be able to run a new line right from where it splits as it comes in the house, etc.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,329

Re: splitting cable

The short answer, no, and.....a qualified maybe. What a technician will do, when he or she installs equipment in your home is ensure that each modem has adequate signal strength so that it will operate within its signal envelope. So, for example if you have two modems, say internet and cable box, you will end up with a two port splitter that drops the signal level by 3.5 dB at each port. With three services, you end up with a three port splitter which has one -3.5 dB port for internet and two -7 dB drops for cable box and phone modem for example or two cable boxes. With four services you would end up with a two port splitter with one port feeding the internet modem and the other port feeding a three port splitter that in turn feeds the other modems. The internet modem should always be on the original port that has the least power drop on it from what I remember.

 

So, if for example, despite all of the cable runs in the house, you only had two modems running with a two port splitter located downstairs, you would need to remove the splitter from its current location and install a high frequency F-81 connector in its place to provide a straight through cable. They look like this:

 

http://www.mjsales.net/itemsearch.asp?FamilyID=854

 

The blue dielectric material usually indicates a high frequency connector. You should be able to find these at a local hardware store, but you would have to ensure that it indicates that it is a high frequency connector.

 

You would then install that splitter on the line that feeds the Nextbox PVR and run one port output to the Nextbox and the other to the modem. You would also have to ensure that you are using good quality RG-6 cables, otherwise you end up with impedance mismatches in the system.

 

Here are the splitters that Rogers uses:

 

http://www.arrisistore.com/attachments/Regal-1GHz-Zinc-DS-Splitters.pdf

 

These are 5 to 1000 Mhz, bi-directional splitters.

 

Beyond that example, if you have other devices running as well it becomes more complicated due to the signal level requirements, and as Gdkitty indicated, it may be time to call tech support to have a tech move the modem and check the signal levels at the same time. You don't want to add amplifiers on your own, as the models that are on the market are Docsis II qualified. Rogers runs a Docsis III system. One of these days, when Rogers decides to flip the switch and use the extended frequency range that has been added to the Docsis III spec, anyone with a Docsis II amplifier that they have installed on their own will suddenly be out of luck. If a tech is called in, who then removes the amplifier, the customer will be charged for the visit due to customer installed equipment. The amplifier that Rogers does use has one port that is not amplified which is used for the internet and VOIP purposes.

 

So, it can be done if your current installation is simple and you understand the fact that the splitter drops the power level to the devices that are connected to it. But if you have a number of modems in use, then it’s not so simple and you would be better off calling in a tech.



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 2,306

Re: splitting cable

The short/simple answer is that any re-location of your internet modem should be done by a rogers technicain to ensure lots of things, for example to make sure the wire going to the modem has sufficient signal strength, and to ensure there is no signal leakage incoming or outgoing from the cable lines which could adversely effect your performance of your cable tv, cable internet and cable home phone systems.

 

its strongly advised to let the tech install the modem because they generally like others on here have said, the modem usually is the first device on the incoming line if you also have a home phone modem, the first split is usually an unbalanced split which gives lower loss to the internet modem, then the next 2 ports are the 6.5 leg which typically goes to the home phone modem then the third 6.5 leg goes to your tv or if u have more than one tv/outlet, this is where the splitter goes that sends the signals to teh rest of your tv's.  hope that makes sense?



Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,329

Re: splitting cable

Additional food for thought. If you have a newer home, there is a chance that it has structured wiring installed. That is set of wire bundles that runs from the structured wiring cabinet in the basement to each room in the house (one run per room normally). The bundle consists of two RG-6 cables for cable or satellite, one Cat 5e ethernet cable for data and one Cat 3 (possibly Cat 5e) for telephone. If you have that installed, you will see the cable ends sitting in the cabinet downstairs, along with the phone modem if you have home phone. If you look behind a wallplate that currently holds a cable or telephone connection, you will see the remainder of the cables in behind the wallplate, if it is installed your home that is.

 

If that wiring is installed, this becomes much easier to accomplish. The second RG-6 cable could be used to run the internet modem. You would need to install compression connectors at both ends if they are not already installed and the wallplates and keystones necessary to run multiple connectors at the same location. With the connector installed downstairs, you would simply disconnect the existing internet cable and connect the cable that you intend to use. Upstairs, with the wallplate and keystones in place to hold both RG-6 cables, install two final cables, one to the Nextbox and the other to the internet modem. You would have to ensure that the correct cable goes to the internet modem to keep the signal losses to a minimum.

 

Here are some examples of keystones and wallplates. The keystones and wallplate would have to be supplied by you, no matter if you did the work, or called in a Rogers tech to complete the install, but its up to the homeowner to take full advantage of the structured wiring, if it is installed in the home.

 

http://www.lowes.ca/multimedia-accessories/legrand-self-terminating-f-keystone-connector-insert_g221...

 

http://www.lowes.ca/multimedia-accessories/on-qlegrand-f3402-wh-v5-keystone-2-port-white-wall-plates...

 

http://www.lowes.ca/multimedia-accessories/legrand-plastic-cat-6-keystone-connector-kit_g2229453.htm...

 

Depending on what you are trying to accomplish, if you have structured wiring installed, you could use the Cat 5e ethernet runs to move data around the house. Maybe the solution is to leave the modem in place and install Cat 5e keystones into various wallplates so that you have wired ethernet capability throughout the house. It all depends on what the end objective is.



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: splitting cable

What are 2 types of Rogers used noise filter stubs (cups) attachable to the splitter port, and why 2 different types are used? The tech during a visit seems to have press-fitted the filter into one threaded splitter port, then how to remove it if needed? Can someone link a datasheet for Antronix splitters?

 

Splitter1.jpg

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,329

Re: splitting cable

@arnym21, are there any markings on that cylinder?  My guess is that its a signal attenuator.  That would drop the signal level to the modem and cause the modem to increase its transmit power on the upstream side.  It should just screw out from the splitter.  It should look like the attenuator on this page:

 

http://www.antronix.com/antronix-Products-Other-Products-Attenuators.php

 

You would be able to tell that it's actually an attenuator.  Take a screen shot of the signal levels on the STATUS .... DOCSIS WAN tab.  Then unscrew the attenuator and connect the cable directly to that port.  Refresh the DOCSIS WAN tab to update the signal levels and signal to noise ratios.  The average amount that the signal level increases should be equal to the rating of the attenuator, if in fact that is what it is.

 

Are you running Whole Home PVR by any chance, which uses MoCA for box to box communications.  I've seen comments in the U.S. DSLReports forums where modem users have connected a MoCA filter at the modem to prevent any interference from household MoCA equipment.  I've never seen that idea expressed in any of the Canadian forums.  So, if the cylinder isn't a signal attenuator, next guess is a MoCA filter, which should be frequency neutral for the modem's DOCSIS frequency range. 



I Plan to Stick Around
Posts: 77

Re: splitting cable

My guess is its a noise filter cup, since it doesn't have a cable attachment point on the open end despite threaded. The irony is, it doesn't have any marks, and neither is removable. It actually press-fitted, and there is no hope to take it out by any means I tried unless destroyed jointly with the splitter. For all I know it can be a spy - signal redirector. Smiley Happy

Resident Expert
Resident Expert
Posts: 5,329

Re: splitting cable

Very strange.  First time anyone has posted an unmarked cable attachment like that .



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